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Hickman (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
t New Madrid to-morrow to arrange for the future; and on the 3d of September, De Russey, Polk's aid-de-camp, telegraphed to the same officer, that the general-commanding determines, with troops now at Union City, to fall at once upon Columbus ; and directed Pillow to take his whole command immediately to Island No.10. This was done, and on the 4th Sept., 1861. Polk seized Hickman and Columbus, and commenced the erection of batteries on the bluff near the latter place. Columbus is in Hickman County, about twenty miles below the mouth of the Ohio River. He immediately telegraphed the fact to Davis, at Richmond, and to The Bluff, and Polk's Headquarters, near Columbus. Governor Harris, at Nashville. On the same day General Polk issued a proclamation, in which he gave as a reason for his violation of the neutrality of Kentucky, that the National Government had done so by establishing camp depots for its armies, by organizing military companies within its territory, and by ma
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ness in duty, Kentucky, five months after the war was begun in Charleston harbor, took a positive stand for the Union. Encouraged by the new attitude of Kentucky, the National Government determined to take vigorous measures for securing its loyalty against the wiles of dangerous men. Ex-Governor Morehead, who was reported to be an active traitor to his country, was arrested at his residence, near Louisville, and sent as a State prisoner to Fort Lafayette, at the entrance to the harbor of New York. Others of like sympathies took the alarm and fled, some to the Confederate armies or the more southern States, and others to Canada. Among them was John C. Breckinridge, late Vice-President of the Republic, and member of the National Senate; also William Preston, late American Minister to Spain; James B. Clay, a son of Henry Clay; Humphrey Marshall, lately a member Humphrey Marshall. of Congress, and a life-long politician; Captain John Morgan, Judge Thomas Monroe, and others of less
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
mands there, is re-enforced sufficiently for him to spread his forces, he will have to take and hold Mayfield and Lovelaceville, to be in the rear and flank of Columbus, and to occupy Smithland, controlling in its way both the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. At the same time Colonel Rousseau should bring his force, increased, if possible, by two Ohio regiments, in boats, to Henderson, and taking the Henderson and Nashville Railroad, occupy Hopkinsville, while General Nelson should go, with a ucted of coal-barges, strongly braced together, and otherwise connected by trestle-work planked over. It was capable of bearing the heaviest ordnance and thousands of men. He also seized and occupied Smithland, not far from the mouth of the Cumberland River, and thus closed two important gateways of supply for the Confederates in the interior of Kentucky and Tennessee, from the Ohio. When Fremont's order for co-operation reached Grant, and was followed the next day by a dispatch, Nov. 2. sa
Belmont, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
In this situation of affairs, he determined to threaten Columbus by attacking Belmont, a little village and landing-place on the Missouri shore opposite, and break Oglesbys force was deflected toward New Madrid, Field of operations against Belmont. and ColonelW. H. L. Wallace, of Illinois, was sent from Cairo to re-enforce him. The movement on Belmont would keep Polk from interfering with Grant's troops in pursuit of Thompson. General Charles F. Smith, a soldier of rare qualities, ight. There Grant received information that Polk was sending troops across to Belmont, to cut off Colonel Oglesby. At dawn the next morning, he pressed forward and landed his forces at Hunter's Point, on the Missouri shore, three miles above Belmont, where a battalion was left to guard the transports from an attack by land, whs of Russell and Tappen (the former acting as brigade commander), then holding Belmont. Grant moved forward, with Dollins' cavalry scouring the woods to the right
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
n its soil, that large National armies were required to oppose them, and war in its most horrid aspects filled all its borders with misery. But for that neutrality, Tennessee, whose disloyal authorities had espoused the Confederate cause, would probably have been the frontier battle-ground, and the blood and treasure of Kentucky, so largely spent in the war, would have been spared. Too late to avoid the penalties of remissness in duty, Kentucky, five months after the war was begun in Charleston harbor, took a positive stand for the Union. Encouraged by the new attitude of Kentucky, the National Government determined to take vigorous measures for securing its loyalty against the wiles of dangerous men. Ex-Governor Morehead, who was reported to be an active traitor to his country, was arrested at his residence, near Louisville, and sent as a State prisoner to Fort Lafayette, at the entrance to the harbor of New York. Others of like sympathies took the alarm and fled, some to the C
Potosi, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
month later the National troops gained a signal victory over the guerrilla chief, Thompson (who was called the Swamp Fox, and his command, the Swamp Fox brigade ), at Frederickton, the capital of Madison County, in Southeastern Missouri. General Grant was in command at Cape Girardeau at that time. General Thompson and Colonel Lowe had been roaming at will over the region between New Madrid and Pilot Knob. Thompson, with six hundred men, had captured the guard at the Big River Bridge, near Potosi, and destroyed that structure on the 15th of October, and on the following day he and Lowe were at the head of a thousand men near Ironton, threatening that place, where they were defeated by Major Gavitt's Indiana cavalry, and a part of Colonel Alexander's Twenty-first Illinois cavalry, with a loss of thirty-six killed and wounded. Grant determined to put an end to the career of these marauders, if possible. Informed that they were near Frederickton, he sent out a considerable force under
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
e Army, in a letter to Governor Harris, from Louisville, said: Many gentlemen, impatient of the posi, as well as those already encamped opposite Louisville, under Colonel Rousseau. I have re-enforcedld go, with a force of 5,000, by railroad to Louisville, and from there to Bowling Green. As the pocountry, was arrested at his residence, near Louisville, and sent as a State prisoner to Fort Lafayee, with the intention of moving quickly upon Louisville, by the rail-way, seizing that city, and estas given of his approach. The trains due at Louisville did not arrive, and the managers sent out an and, procuring a hand-car, soon returned to Louisville with the startling news. General Andersone at Camp Joe Holt, See page 72. and some Louisville Home Guards. These were his only available er, who was in delicate health, remaining in Louisville to forward re-enforcements. Fortunately, Buk. But for this, Buckner might have reached Louisville before Anderson could have put any forces in[2 more...]
Pollard (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
g. General Pillow, whose performances on this occasion were the least creditable, with his usual bombast and exaggerations, spoke in his report of his small Spartan army withstanding the constant fire of three times their number for four hours.--Pollard's First Year of the War, 203. and Polk six hundred and thirty-two. Official reports of Grant and Polk, and their subordinate officers; private letter of General Grant to his father, Nov. 8th, 1861; Grant's Revised Report, June 26th, 1865; PolPollard's First Year of the War. The latter gives the Confederate loss as it is above recorded. Ms. Reports of Acting Brigadier-General R. M. Russell, Nov. 9, and of Colonels E. Ricketts, Jr., and T. H. Bell, Nov. 11, 1861. Cotemporaries and eye-witnesses on both sides related many deeds of special daring by individuals. The repulse of Grant did not relieve the Confederates of a sense of impending great danger. for intelligence was continually reaching Columbus of the increase of National for
Garrard (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ernor Harris. and recruiting for the latter went on openly. The Unionists soon followed the example, and Camp Joe Holt was established near Louisville, at an early day, as a military rendezvous for loyal citizens. This was chiefly the work of Lovell H. Rousseau, a loyal State Senator who, when he left the hall of legislation, prepared for the inevitable conflict for the National life. At about the same time, William Nelson, another loyal Kentuckian, established a similar rendezvous in Garrard County, in Eastern Kentucky, called Camp Dick Robinson. Both of these men were afterward major-generals in the National Volunteer service. The Government encouraged these Union movements. All Kentucky, within a hundred miles south of the Ohio River, had been made a military department, at the head of which was placed Robert Anderson, the hero of Fort Sumter, who, on the 14th of May, had been commissioned a brigadier-general of Volunteers. Headquarters at camp Dick Robinson. When Uni
Blue Mills, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ceived from Pope Sept. 22. the sad news of Mulligan's surrender. The active and vigilant Price, with a force of more than twenty-five thousand men, had been enabled to beat back re-enforcements for the garrison and to keep the way open for recruits for his own army. Martin Green, already mentioned (see page 55), was at about that time operating successfully in Northeastern Missouri with 8,000 men. They were effectually broken up by General Pope. In this work a severe fight occurred at Blue Mills, on the Missouri, thirty miles above Lexington, on the 17th, Sept., 1861. in which the insurgents, commanded by General David R. Atchinson, Atchinson was at one time a member of the United States Senate, and was conspicuous as a leader of the Missourians called Border Ruffians, who played a prominent part in the politics of Kansas a <*> years before. were victorious; and on the 19th, General Sturgis, with a large body of cavalry, appeared opposite Lexington, but finding no boats for tr
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