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Mossy Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
n's Station, on account of the snow and cold, a large number of his men being barefooted, now fell back toward Bull's Gap, at the junction of the Rogersville branch with the main railway. General Burnside had now retired from the command of the Army of the Ohio, which was assumed Dec. 11. by General John G. Foster, his successor in North Carolina. The first event of much importance that occurred after Foster's accession and the affair at Bean's Station, was a fight, Dec. 29. between Mossy Creek and New Market, by the National advance at Knoxville, under General S. D. Sturgis, with an estimated force of nearly six thousand Confederates, under the notorious guerrilla chief, J. H. Morgan, and Martin Armstrong. The Confederates were vanquished, with a loss never reported, but estimated at full three hundred men. Sturgis's loss was about one hundred. At the same time, Wheeler, with about twelve hundred mounted men, had come up from Georgia, and was boldly operating between Knoxvill
Pine Bluff (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
with about two thousand men, struck August 23. the line of the railway between Duvall's Bluff and Little Rock, and captured nearly the whole of the Fifty-fourth Illinois, who were guarding it at three points. Guerrillas hovered in large numbers around Little Rock and other places, making communications between the military posts dangerous, and requiring heavy escort duty, which wore down men and horses. Gradually several of these posts were abandoned, and at the close of 1864 only Helena, Pine, and Duvall's Bluffs, Little Rock, Van Buren, Fort Smith, and one or two other posts in that region, were held by the National troops. These being insufficient to protect the Unionists of the Commonwealth, they became disheartened, silent, and inactive, for the guerrillas, who roamed over the State, dealt vengeance upon these traitors and renegades, as they called them. General Steele, like other old officers of the regular army, was opposed to the emancipation policy of the Government, a
Fayetteville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ck, plundering and overawing the Unionists. Nor did they confine themselves to that region. Late in June 1864. Shelby, with a considerable body of Confederate cavalry, dashed across the Arkansas eastward of Little Rock, and pushed on to the White River, on the eastern border of Arkansas County, where they were attacked and thrown back, in the vicinity of St. Charles, by four regiments under General Carr, with a loss of about four hundred men, of whom two hundred were made prisoners. Carr's Sandborn, who had marched one hundred and two miles in thirty-six hours, came up and assisted in defeating him. Price again fled, and made his way into Western Arkansas, followed by Curtis, who found Nov. 14. Colonel La Rue, who was occupying Fayetteville, with the First Arkansas (Union) Cavalry, closely besieged by an overwhelming force. Colonel Brooks had surrounded the post with two thousand Confederates, whom La Rue easily kept at bay until Fagan's division of Price's flying army came to h
Van Buren, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
t 23. the line of the railway between Duvall's Bluff and Little Rock, and captured nearly the whole of the Fifty-fourth Illinois, who were guarding it at three points. Guerrillas hovered in large numbers around Little Rock and other places, making communications between the military posts dangerous, and requiring heavy escort duty, which wore down men and horses. Gradually several of these posts were abandoned, and at the close of 1864 only Helena, Pine, and Duvall's Bluffs, Little Rock, Van Buren, Fort Smith, and one or two other posts in that region, were held by the National troops. These being insufficient to protect the Unionists of the Commonwealth, they became disheartened, silent, and inactive, for the guerrillas, who roamed over the State, dealt vengeance upon these traitors and renegades, as they called them. General Steele, like other old officers of the regular army, was opposed to the emancipation policy of the Government, and his alleged sympathy with the slave-hol
Kelly's Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rland Gap road, he turned Dec. 14, 1863. sharply upon his pursuers. A brisk conflict was kept up until night, when the Nationals had been pushed back nearly a mile. The contest was indecisive, but somewhat sanguinary, Shackleford, who was in chief command of the pursuers, losing about two hundred men. Longstreet's loss, it was computed, was much greater. He sought, during the struggle, to strike Shackleford in the rear, by sending a force down the left bank of the Holston, to cross at Kelly's Ford, and come up from the west. The vigilant General Ferrero prevented this movement, by sending General Humphrey to hold that ford. Longstreet, being unable to follow up his advantage acquired at Bean's Station, on account of the snow and cold, a large number of his men being barefooted, now fell back toward Bull's Gap, at the junction of the Rogersville branch with the main railway. General Burnside had now retired from the command of the Army of the Ohio, which was assumed Dec. 11. b
Bean's Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
See page 175. and his withdrawal toward Virginia, he was pursued by cavalry under Shackleford, Wolford, Graham, and Foster, into Jefferson County, where, near Bean's Station, on the Morristown and Cumberland Gap road, he turned Dec. 14, 1863. sharply upon his pursuers. A brisk conflict was kept up until night, when the Nationalsilant General Ferrero prevented this movement, by sending General Humphrey to hold that ford. Longstreet, being unable to follow up his advantage acquired at Bean's Station, on account of the snow and cold, a large number of his men being barefooted, now fell back toward Bull's Gap, at the junction of the Rogersville branch with . 11. by General John G. Foster, his successor in North Carolina. The first event of much importance that occurred after Foster's accession and the affair at Bean's Station, was a fight, Dec. 29. between Mossy Creek and New Market, by the National advance at Knoxville, under General S. D. Sturgis, with an estimated force of near
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s practically surrendered to the Confederates. The disloyal Governor called a session of the Legislature, which met at Washington, Sept. 22. and chose a Senator (A. P. Garland) to represent the State in the Congress at Richmond. The condition ofhis Headquarters to be with the Army of the Potomac until further orders. A week afterward he arrived March 23. in Washington City from the West, with a portion of his domestic and military families, and went immediately to the Headquarters of Genhasing Price out of that State. Generals Sykes, Newton, French, Kenly, Spinola, and Meredith, were relieved and sent to Washington for orders. General Burnside, who, since his retirement from the command of the Army of the Ohio, at Knoxville, in Decant-Colonels W. R. Rowley and Adam Badeau, secretaries; Captain George K. Leet, assistant adjutantgeneral, in office at Washington; Captain H. W. Janes, assistant quartermaster, on duty at Headquarters, and First-Lieutenant William Dunn, acting aid-d
Williamstown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
om friends or foes, and by that means his followers were soon so well mounted that they were enabled to sweep rapidly through the eastern counties of Kentucky, from Johnson to Harrison, by way of Paintville on the west fork of the Big Sandy, through Hazel Green, Owensville, and Mount Sterling, to Paris and Cynthiana, in the richest part of the commonwealth, and to give to that region a new claim to the title of the dark and bloody ground. He captured Mount Sterling, Paris, Cynthiana, and Williamstown, almost without resistance; and burnt railway trains, stations, and bridges, tore up tracks, and plundered without fear, for the troops in the path of his desolation were too few or feeble to check him. His men were divided into raiding parties, and one of these, three hundred strong, led by Colonel Giltner, actually pushed General Hobson, with twelve hundred well-armed men, into a bend of the Licking River, in Nicholas County, and captured him and his troops. When General Burbridge wa
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ust invasion of Missouri, 280. affairs in East Tennessee stirring operations there, 281. Longstrew, 283. the author in the great Valley of East Tennessee Governor Brownlow and his family, 284. G lines. Morgan and his men lingered in East Tennessee about four months after Longstreet withdreonal forces from Southwestern Virginia and East Tennessee. As this was the last important raid in wginia, and made his way into the valley of East Tennessee. There, with a small band, he did what heonspicuous in the annals of the Civil War in Tennessee. His house was the abode of intellectual cuwnlow's library. When Buckner was holding East Tennessee, at the time Burnside entered it from Kente of the most noted of the Union scouts in East Tennessee, we journeyed by railway to Greenville, ne The whole region of the great Valley of East Tennessee, eastward as well as westward of Knoxvillee Longstreet's corps, lately returned from East Tennessee, was in the vicinity of Gordonsville, with[8 more...]
Blue Springs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
. Williams, in Greenfield, while endeavoring to escape. He was struck in the center of his breast, the ball passing through his heart. It is stated that Morgan, when killed, was dressed in the National uniform. See Knoxville Whig, September 14, 1864. The whole region of the great Valley of East Tennessee, eastward as well as westward of Knoxville, is clustered with the most stirring associations of the Civil War. We passed on our journey from Knoxville, Strawberry Plain, Bull's Gap, Blue Springs, and other places already mentioned as scenes of conflict; and from Greenville to Bristol, on the borders of Virginia, such notable places were many. Over that region and beyond we passed on the night of the 24th and 25th, May, 1866. and at six o'clock in the morning were at Mount Airy, twenty-eight hundred feet above the Richmond basin, and said to be the most lofty point of railway travel in the United States. We descended into the rugged valleys eastward of this Appalachian range, a
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