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Harrison's Landing (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
f a gun to explode a percussion cap. by which twenty of its officers and crew were killed, and forty-eight were wounded. In the mean time Colonel West, with his cavalry, had made his way across the Chickahominy to the shore of the James at Harrison's Landing, and been taken thence, on transports, to Bermuda Hundred. A quick and vigorous movement upon Petersburg and Richmond at that time might have resulted in the capture of both cities, for very few Confederate troops appear to have then beey at Long Bridge with very little trouble, and made demonstrations in the direction of Richmond, to mask the real movements of the army. Hancock followed Warren across the stream, and marched directly to Wilcox's Wharf, on the James, below Harrison's Landing, between Charles City Court-House and Westover, See page 455, volume II. where he was ferried across. Wright and Burnside crossed the Chickahominy at Jones's. bridge, lower down; while the trains, for greater safety, took a route still
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Carolina, led by General Gillmore, who arrived at Fortress Monroe on the 3d of May. Butler's first care was to mislead the Confederates concerning his intentions. For that purpose he first sent May 1. Henry's brigade of New York troops to West Point, at the head of York River, to begin the construction of wharves, Confederate defenses between Hampton and Williamsburg. while cavalry made a demonstration in the direction of Richmond. He also sent the bulk of his army in that direction as the space of twenty-four hours, Butler gained a commanding and important foothold within fifteen miles of Richmond, in a straight line, and only about eight from Petersburg. At sunset on the 4th, you were threatening the enemy's capital from West Point and White House, within thirty miles on its eastern side. Within twenty-four hours, at sunset on the 5th of May, by a march of 130 miles, you transported 35,000 men-their luggage, supplies, horses, wagons and artillery-within fifteen miles of
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
o Bermuda Hundred. A quick and vigorous movement upon Petersburg and Richmond at that time might have resulted in the capture of both cities, for very few Confederate troops appear to have then been in either place. That fact was unknown by the Nationals, and a wise caution, rightfully exercised, caused a delay fatal to the speedy achievement of such victories, for strength was quickly imparted to both posts. When the movement of Butler and the arrival of Gillmore with troops from Charleston harbor was first known to the Confederates at Richmond, Beauregard was ordered to hasten from Charleston to the latter place, with all possible dispatch, with the troops under his command there, others drawn from Georgia and Florida, and such as he might gather in his passage through North Carolina. He instantly obeyed, and when General Kautz struck the Weldon road, as we have seen, he found these re-enforcements for Lee passing over it. A large portion of them were left south of that cuttin
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ts, and destroyed it without molestation, and then, with Weitzel in the advance, they moved on Petersburg. They were confronted by a heavy Confederate force at Swift Creek, within three miles of that city, where a sharp action ensued. The Confederates were driven across the stream; and that evening Butler sent a dispatch to the S was in full retreat on Richmond. If so, he might quickly and heavily fall, with crushing force, on the Army of the James, so Butler recalled his troops from. Swift Creek, strengthened his lines, and prepared for active co-operation in an attack on Richmond. The story was not true. On the 12th, Butler pushed a heavy column noopposition, and opened the way for the army, which reached the North Anna on the morning of the 23d, at three fords, known respectively as Island, Jericho, and Chesterfield, or Taylor's Bridge — the latter near where the Richmond and Fredericksburg railway crosses that river. Lee, marching by the shorter route, had outstripped
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
e page, omitted by accident when that record was printed, will not only give the reader an idea of the entire region of stirring operations in Southeastern Virginia at that time, but may be usefully consulted when studying the great and decisive campaign we are now considering. and they made preparations accordingly. They were quickly undeceived, but not until it was too late to prevent the mischief wrought by the deception. On the night of the 4th, May, 1864. transports, sent up from Hampton Roads, conveyed Butler's army around to the James River, and by dawn the next morning, artillery and infantry, to the number of thirty-five thousand men, accompanied by a squadron of war vessels, under Admiral Lee, were rapidly ascending that stream for the purpose of seizing City Point. The transports were preceded by three army gun-boats, under the command of General Charles R. Graham, formerly of the navy. The remainder of the naval force consisted of four monitors, the iron-clad Atlant
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
nding that stream for the purpose of seizing City Point. The transports were preceded by three armond or Petersburg immediately after seizing City Point and Bermuda Hundred, he was forced to be govthe Appomattox River, between Petersburg and City Point, and at. the head of navigation for the largirmished sharply at many places, and took to City Point one hundred and fifty prisoners, of whom thi, upon the beautiful Grant's Headquarters, City Point. this was the appearance of Grant's Headquarters when the writer visited City Point, at the close of 1864. the building seen in the center wtox River, about ten miles from its mouth at City Point. That river is navigable to Petersburg for a short one also connected Petersburg with. City Point. the possession of which would be of vast impomattox at Point of Rocks, four miles above City Point. Gillmore marched up the turnpike, while Kaining the state of affairs, was returning to City Point, when he met General Meade on the road, and [7 more...]
Dutch Gap (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
nd destroy and hold, if possible, the railway in that vicinity. Terry easily passed through those lines, and reached the road without much opposition, and was proceeding to destroy the track, when he was attacked by Pickett's division of Longstreet's Corps, then on its way from the Virginia capital to the beleaguered City. in co-operation with Pickett's movement was a naval demonstration by the Confederates, who sent three iron-clad steamers down the James River from Drewry's Bluff, to Dutch Gap, hoping to divert the attention of Admiral Lee from the attack that might be made upon Butler if he should attempt to interfere with the passage of the troops to Petersburg; also with a hope of damaging the National squadron. But they effected nothing, and were easily driven back. Smith's Corps (Eighteenth) having been relieved by the Sixth, was sent by Grant to aid Butler, in the event of an exigency such as had now occurred; but it arrived too late to assist Terry, and the latter, after
Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
between Hampton and Williamsburg. while cavalry made a demonstration in the direction of Richmond. He also sent the bulk of his army in that direction as far as the old lines of McClellan For an account of the operations of McClellan between Fortress Monroe and Williamsburg, see Chapters. XIV. and XV., volume II. The route from Hampton; the fortifications at Big Bethel, and in the vicinity of Yorktown and Williamsburg, are indicated in the little map on this page. at Yorktown and Gloucester Point; and so successful was the stratagem, that the Confederates were satisfied that Butler was about to move on Richmond in the pathway trodden by McClellan two years before, See chapters XIV., XV., and XVI., volume II. The map on the opposite page, omitted by accident when that record was printed, will not only give the reader an idea of the entire region of stirring operations in Southeastern Virginia at that time, but may be usefully consulted when studying the great and decisive cam
Bermuda Hundred (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ng between it and the James River, called Bermuda Hundred, and proceeded to cast up a line of intre immediately after seizing City Point and Bermuda Hundred, he was forced to be governed by circumstty from the South and Southwest. He left Bermuda Hundred on the 12th of May, with two brigades, ad of the York, and sent back by water to Bermuda Hundred. Then the Army of the Potomac moved. Wased, in completeness Line of defense at Bermuda hundred. this shows a portion of the line of won that Smith was so quickly sent back to Bermuda hundred, as we have observed. see page 333. n its passage of the James, Grant went to Bermuda hundred, and finding the van of Lee's Army, underement, was driven back to the defenses of Bermuda hundred, when the Confederate works in front of tas immediately connected with the Army at Bermuda hundred by a pontoon bridge, represented in the eh's (Eighteenth) corps was transferred to Bermuda hundred, and thenceforth served with the Army of [10 more...]
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
the Army of the Potomac an admirable water base of supplies, at White House. The chief base of the army, while it was at Spottsylvania Cosouth of the Pamunkey, and in communication with its new base at White House. Grant's movement summoned Lee to another compulsory abandonmee note 2, page 886, volume II. where roads leading to Richmond, White House, and other points diverged. That important point was seized by thousand in number, which had been taken in transports around to White House. The two armies were now upon the old battle-field of Lee and Ms the firm occupation of Cool Arbor, which commanded the road to White House, and was the chosen place from which to force a passage of the Ce lower crossings of the Chickahominy, and covering the roads to White House. Orders had been given for a general assault along the whole lievery thing was in readiness for the army to move to the James. White House was abandoned as a base of supplies; the rails and ties of the Y
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