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Trinity, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
s. This estimate of the strength of the enemy was given in my dispatch of February 2, but was thought, upon information received by the Government, to be exaggerated. The defences of the enemy consisted of a series of works covering the approaches to Galveston and Houston from the south, the defences of Galveston Bay, Sabine Pass, and Sabine River; Fort De Russy, a formidable work, located three miles from Marksville, for the defence of the Red River, and extensive and formidable works at Trinity, the junction of the Tensas and Washita at Camden, commanding approaches from the north. To meet these forces of the enemy it was proposed to concentrate, in some general plan of operations, 15,000 of the troops under command of General Steele, a detachment of 10,000 from the command of General Sherman, and a force of from 15,000 to 17,000 men from the army of the Gulf, making an army of 40,000 to 42,000 men of all arms, with such gun-boats as the Navy Department should order. Orders we
Mound City (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
Second-Assistant, Thompson Guernsey. Steam-tug Dahlia. Acting-Ensign, W. H. Strope; Acting-Master's Mate, Thomas Roach; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, J. H. Everhart; Acting-Second-Assistant, John Cook. Steam-tug Hyacinth. Acting-Ensign, J. B. Hiserman; Acting-Master's Mate, James Nelis; Engineer: Acting-Second-Assistant, Thomas Bell. Steam-tug Ivy. Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Eugene Callahan; Acting-Third-Assistant, T. H. Neely. Naval stations at Cairo and Mound City. Captain Alex. M. Pennock, Fleet-Captain and Commandant of Station; Commander Fabius Stanley, Ordnance Officer; Fleet-Paymaster, E. W. Dunn; Paymasters, W. B. Boggs and A. H. Gilman; Assistant-Fleet-Paymaster, John Reed; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Harvey; Surgeon, J. W. Shively; Acting-Chief-Engineer, Wm. D. Faulkner; Acting-Masters, P. O. Kell and J. W. Atkinson; Acting-Ensigns, C. F. Nellis and J. M. Bailey; Acting Master's Mate, Rivers Drake; Gunner, J. C. Ritter; Acting-Boats
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 44
tton and assume a hostile attitude, because it seized some of the staple, is absurd. If the cotton was to be taken out of the country for the benefit of the United States, it did not matter who took it, as long as the Government received it, which it was sure to do if captured by the Navy. All the cotton seized by the Navy waeceipts were given, in every instance, by which those persons who established a claim to any of the cotton received the value of it, after the war, through the United States courts. Any one who will take the trouble to read the report of the Committee on the Conduct of the War, will see that in the vast amount of evidence given,d have had more success as a general. He had not much force of character, and lacked nerve in time of danger. As Governor of Massachusetts and Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, no one has ever questioned his ability; yet, strange to say, Banks always preferred to be considered a soldier rather than a statesma
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
rned to their owners in Cairo, Illinois, without any expense for transportation. These facts were proved in evidence by Lieutenant-Commander K. R. Breese, of the Navy, and others, and many instances could be cited from the books kept at Cairo. Illinois, by Captain A. M. Pennock, Chief-of-Staff. If this expedition was intended as a commercial one, the Army and Navy commanders should have received such instructions that there would have been no clashing of interests; but while Banks was sent as conducted from Washington. Here was Grant, just successful in one of the most difficult sieges of modern times, with a great prestige, and supposed to command all the troops in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois and Ohio, yet it does not appear that his opinion in regard to the Red River expedition was ever asked. Grant had about that time gone to Chattanooga on a tour of inspection, and thought the Red River expedition of so little importance that he
Cowleech Fork Sabine River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
ble army of from 25,000 to 30,000 men, equal to any forces that could be brought against them, even with the most perfect unity and co-operation of commands. This estimate of the strength of the enemy was given in my dispatch of February 2, but was thought, upon information received by the Government, to be exaggerated. The defences of the enemy consisted of a series of works covering the approaches to Galveston and Houston from the south, the defences of Galveston Bay, Sabine Pass, and Sabine River; Fort De Russy, a formidable work, located three miles from Marksville, for the defence of the Red River, and extensive and formidable works at Trinity, the junction of the Tensas and Washita at Camden, commanding approaches from the north. To meet these forces of the enemy it was proposed to concentrate, in some general plan of operations, 15,000 of the troops under command of General Steele, a detachment of 10,000 from the command of General Sherman, and a force of from 15,000 to 17,
Fort Taylor (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
rleans, the organization of the troops of my command assigned to the expedition was intrusted to Major-General W. B. Franklin. The main body of his command, consisting of the 19th corps--except Grover's division at Madisonville, which was to join him — and one division of the 13th corps, under General Ransom, were at this time on Berwick's Bay, between Berwick City and Franklin, on the Bayou Teche, directly on the line of march for Alexandria and Shreveport. Small garrisons were left at Brownsville and Matagorda Bay, in Texas--positions which, under instructions from the President and subsequently from Lieutenant-General Grant, were not to be abandoned — at New Orleans and at Port Hudson, which was threatened by a vigorous and active enemy. Smaller garrisons at Baton Rouge and Donaldson ville on the river, and at Pensacola and Key West on the coast, constituted the balance of forces under my command, It had been arranged that the troops concentrated at Franklin should move for t
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
ant objective point of the operations of a campaign of troops about to take a position where they could command Texas, and establish a better line of defence for Arkansas and Missouri than now occupied by General Steele, yet the Administration does not desire in any manner to control your actions as to the time and manner of perfo Here was Grant, just successful in one of the most difficult sieges of modern times, with a great prestige, and supposed to command all the troops in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois and Ohio, yet it does not appear that his opinion in regard to the Red River expedition was ever asked. Grsippi, and such other force as should be assigned to this duty from General Sherman's command, in such a manner as to expel the enemy from northern Louisiana and Arkansas; 4th, such preparation and concert of action among the different corps employed as to prevent the enemy, by keeping him constantly engaged, from operating agains
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
tant one from Mobile to Montgomery, which, with a Union Army at Mobile, would have insured the pacification of Alabama and Mississippi, and would have prevented any attempt on the part of the Confederates to pursue Sherman's rear; and in case of necessity the Federals could have thrown a large part of Bank's Army by rail upon Montgomery and Atlanta, if Sherman had got into difficulty, and there would have been a line of communication open to Sherman from the time he started until he reached Savannah. General Banks made a report to Mr. Wade, President of the Senate, of his operations from the time he took command at New Orleans until his return from the Red River expedition. The report is interesting, and shows that a great deal of work was projected and a great deal performed. We know nothing of General Banks' performances prior to the advance on Alexandria; but, judging from his statements in regard to matters that came under our cognizance, we should pronounce the report partial
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
h corps, under General Ransom, were at this time on Berwick's Bay, between Berwick City and Franklin, on the Bayou Teche, directly on the line of march for Alexandria and Shreveport. Small garrisons were left at Brownsville and Matagorda Bay, in Texas--positions which, under instructions from the President and subsequently from Lieutenant-General Grant, were not to be abandoned — at New Orleans and at Port Hudson, which was threatened by a vigorous and active enemy. Smaller garrisons at Baton Rouge and Donaldson ville on the river, and at Pensacola and Key West on the coast, constituted the balance of forces under my command, It had been arranged that the troops concentrated at Franklin should move for the Red River on the 7th of March, to meet the forces of General Sherman at Alexandria on the 17th. But, for causes stated by General Franklin, their march was delayed until the 13th, at which time the advance, under General A. L Lee, left Franklin, the whole column following soon
Pleasant Hill Landing (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
s arrived, and there was no departure from the plan of campaign in making such arrangement. It was a very necessary arrangement, for the campaign could not have been conducted without using Alexandria as a base of supplies. The number, etc., of the enemy's forces is greatly overstated by General Banks. They did not, all told, number more than 20,000 men, among them were 6,000 or 7,000 raw troops from Texas, commanded by General Green. These were badly cut up by the gun-boats at Pleasant Hill Landing. Another mistake of Banks is to be found in the recapitulation of his report. He says eight days may be set down to General Franklin for his tardy movements, and the rest of the time to delay in getting the fleet over the Falls. The General reflects on the Admiral for undertaking to get twenty ironclads of heavy draft over the Falls and up the river on a falling water. There were but six iron-clads in the fleet, and of these the Eastport and Ozark were the only two from which t
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