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Southampton (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 7
Thomas, in one of the regular passenger lines of the British Royal Mail Steamship Company, running from Vera Cruz, via Havana, to St. Thomas, and thence to Southampton, England. We paid our passage money for the whole route from Havana to Southampton to the British consul at Havana, who acts as the agent or representative of the Southampton to the British consul at Havana, who acts as the agent or representative of the said company; Mr. Slidell being accompanied by his family, consisting of his wife, four children and a servant, and Mr. Eustis by his wife and servants. The Trent left Havana about 8 o'clock, a. m., on the morning of the 7th inst., and pursued her voyage uninterruptedly until intercepted by the United States steamer San Jacinto,The Commissioners and their suite were conveyed in this steamer to the island of St. Thomas, and thence by the colonial steam line which took passengers to Southampton, England, where they arrived safely. But notwithstanding the excitement in England. they were received with no official distinction. The exultation of the Conf
France (France) (search for this): chapter 7
om the Confederate Government to the Courts of England and France; the other two were Messrs. Eustis and McFarland, attachesextend to us the courtesy that would have been extended to France or Russia under like circumstances. It all looked very er deck two insurgents, who were proceeding to England and France on an errand of treason against their own country. He say, on the 10th December, the Minister of Foreign Affairs in France wrote to the representative of that court at Washington: The arrest had produced in France, if not the same emotion as in England, at least extreme astonishmient and sensation. ught to bear upon the government and the attitude taken by France, wise counsels finally prevailed; and it was determined by could turn them out. It is not improbable that neither France nor England would have taken so fierce a stand if the Tren it was uncertain whether they would be received or not by France or by England It was necessary that the administration
Provincetown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the determination to be taken. In view of the pressure brought to bear upon the government and the attitude taken by France, wise counsels finally prevailed; and it was determined by the Federal Government to give up Messrs. Mason and Slidell to the representatives of the British Government authorized to receive them, and instructions were sent to the commanding officer at Fort Warren to place them on a small steamer and have them delivered on board a British war steamer then lying at Provincetown. The Commissioners and their suite were conveyed in this steamer to the island of St. Thomas, and thence by the colonial steam line which took passengers to Southampton, England, where they arrived safely. But notwithstanding the excitement in England. they were received with no official distinction. The exultation of the Confederates at what they chose to call the humiliation of the United States was excessive, though it would have pleased them better if the Federal government ha
Havana (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 7
between England and the West Indies. The Trent left the port of Havana on the morning of the 7th of November, under the command of Captain and our transfer to this ship. We, the undersigned, embarked at Havana on the 7th inst. as passengers on board the Trent, Captain Moir, boe British Royal Mail Steamship Company, running from Vera Cruz, via Havana, to St. Thomas, and thence to Southampton, England. We paid our passage money for the whole route from Havana to Southampton to the British consul at Havana, who acts as the agent or representative of the saiHavana, who acts as the agent or representative of the said company; Mr. Slidell being accompanied by his family, consisting of his wife, four children and a servant, and Mr. Eustis by his wife and servants. The Trent left Havana about 8 o'clock, a. m., on the morning of the 7th inst., and pursued her voyage uninterruptedly until interce along the Old Bahama or Nicholas channel, was about 240 miles from Havana, and in sight of the light-house Panador Grande; the San Jacinto be
Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ountry, who never stopped to think what the consequences might be; nor did they reflect that we were not in a condition to go to war with Great Britain on a point of this kind, where we could find no exact precedents by which to justify ourselves; and when in like cases on the part of England we had placed her in the wrong in the war of 1812, and retaliated on her so severely that she was glad to invoke peace. In the mean time Messrs. Mason and Slidell were confined in Fort Warren (in Boston harbor), as close prisoners. The excitement in England was intense, and all those who entertained ill feelings against the United States and her institutions were not slow in manifesting them. The British Government took the matter in hand at once, and preparations for war were commenced on a large scale. Troops were sent to Canada without the English Government making inquiries into the matter, or waiting to see if the United States had not some explanation to make in relation to the ac
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 7
pitating the United States into a war with Great Britain, at a time when it was most desirable to h particular in the care of its commerce as Great Britain. She keeps large fleets in all parts of td on with anxiety, anticipating a war between England and the Northern States of the Union. Thisance of the Commissioners on their landing in England, where they expected to be received (when relwires under the sea were flashing the news to England about the outrage to the British flag. Theat with the most friendly feelings towards Great Britain. It was hard to make our people believe t were not in a condition to go to war with Great Britain on a point of this kind, where we could fiselves; and when in like cases on the part of England we had placed her in the wrong in the war of or), as close prisoners. The excitement in England was intense, and all those who entertained il last haughty and unreasonable demand that Great Britain will ever make upon the United States. Sh[28 more...]
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
est excitement throughout all parts of the United States and Great Britain; in fact, all Europe loor announced himself as a lieutenant of the United States Steamer San Jacinto. The four gentlemenopy of this paper to the Government of the United States, together with your report of the transact amity, and which at that time (before the United States had fairly collected her armies), was strung subsisted between Great Britain and the United States, are willing to believe that the United Sth was somewhat remarkable, inasmuch as the United States of the North had proclaimed themselves as mages. This course would have saved the United States the humiliation of making a forced apologymediate redress or else demanding war. The United States was too weak at that moment to enter into uestion that had arisen between it and the United States, and the evident desire of Lord John Russeo meddle with. Notwithstanding that the United States came near being mortified before the whole[26 more...]
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 7
ty, to make certain demands of the Government of the United States. Should Mr. Seward ask for delay in order that this grave and public matter should be deliberately considered, you will consent to a delay not exceeding seven days. If at the end of that time no answer is given, or any answer is given except that of a compliance with the demands of her Majesty's Government, your lordship is instructed to leave Washington with all the members of the legation, and to repair immediately to London. If, however, you should be of the opinion that the requirements of her Majesty's Government are substantially complied with, you may report the facts to her Majesty's Government and remain at your post till you receive further orders. A copy of the first dispatch from Lord John Russell was handed to the Secretary of State, Mr. Seward, by Lord Lyons. Our wily diplomatist and statesman was not in the least flurried or taken aback by the implied threat of the British Government. He
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
es frigate San Jacinto, and taking from her four male passengers who claimed the protection of the British flag. Two of these gentlemen were Messrs. Mason and Slidell, formerly members of the U. S. Senate, who were now bound to Europe as commissioners from the Confederate Government to the Courts of England and France; the other two were Messrs. Eustis and McFarland, attaches to the commissioners. The Trent was one of a line of British steamers which ran regularly between Vera Cruz and Havana, thence to St. Thomas, and from there to England. The company had a contract with the British Government to carry the mails, and its steamers had ample accommodations for the passenger travel between England and the West Indies. The Trent left the port of Havana on the morning of the 7th of November, under the command of Captain Moir. Nothing of interest occurred until about noon of the 8th, when, in the narrow passage of the Old Bahama Channel, opposite the Panador Grande light, fr
Saint Thomas (search for this): chapter 7
erate Government to the Courts of England and France; the other two were Messrs. Eustis and McFarland, attaches to the commissioners. The Trent was one of a line of British steamers which ran regularly between Vera Cruz and Havana, thence to St. Thomas, and from there to England. The company had a contract with the British Government to carry the mails, and its steamers had ample accommodations for the passenger travel between England and the West Indies. The Trent left the port of Havaed, embarked at Havana on the 7th inst. as passengers on board the Trent, Captain Moir, bound to the Island of St. Thomas, in one of the regular passenger lines of the British Royal Mail Steamship Company, running from Vera Cruz, via Havana, to St. Thomas, and thence to Southampton, England. We paid our passage money for the whole route from Havana to Southampton to the British consul at Havana, who acts as the agent or representative of the said company; Mr. Slidell being accompanied by his fa
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