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Jefferson Barracks (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
as appointed to an infantry regiment, and, before joining, went home on leave with a desperate cough and a stature which had run up too fast for his strength. In September, 1843, he joined his regiment, the 4th United States infantry, at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis. No doubt his training at West Point, an establishment with a public and high standing, and with serious studies, had been invaluable to him. But still he had no desire to remain in the army. At St. Louis he met and became attached to a young lady whom he afterwards married, Miss Dent, and his hope was to become an assistant professor of mathematics at West Point. With this hope he reread at Jefferson Barracks his West Point mathematics, and pursued a course of historical study also. But the Mexican war came on and kept him in the army. With the annexation of Texas in prospect, Grant's regiment was moved to Fort Jessup, on the western border of Louisiana. Ostensibly the American troops were to prevent filibuster
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
l. Grant himself had a horse shot under him. Very important posts to the Confederates were Fort Henry on the Tennessee and Fort Donelson on the Cumberland River. Grant thought he could capture FoFort Henry. He went to St. Louis to see General Halleck, whose subordinate he was, and to state his plan. I was received with so little cordiality that I perhaps stated the object of my visit with les at Cairo, he renewed, by telegraph, the suggestion that, if permitted, he could take and hold Fort Henry on the Tennessee. This time he was backed by the officer in command of the gunboats. Next daully to explain his plan. In two days he received instructions from headquarters to move upon Fort Henry, and on the 2nd of February, 1862, the expedition started. He took Fort Henry on the 6th ofFort Henry on the 6th of February, and announcing his success to General Halleck, informed him that he would now take Fort Donelson. On the 16th, Fort Donelson surrendered, and. Grant made nearly 15,000 prisoners. There was
Puebla (Puebla, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1
if Mexico should attack our troops, the Executive could announce: Whereas war exists by the acts of, etc., and prosecute the contest with vigour. Once initiated, there were few public men who would have the courage to oppose it. Incensed at the Americans fortifying themselves on the Rio Grande, opposite Matamoras, the Mexicans at last fired the necessary shot, and the war was commenced. This was in March 1846. In September 1847 the American army entered the city of Mexico. Vera Cruz, Puebla, and other principal cities of the country, were already in their possession. In February 1848 was signed the treaty which gave to the United States Texas with the Rio Grande for its boundary, and the whole territory then included in New Mexico and Upper California. For New Mexico and California, however, the Americans paid a sum of fifteen millions of dollars. Grant marks with sagacity and justness the causes and effects of the Mexican war. As the North grew in numbers and population,
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
. I took the captain with me, but did not use his gun. When the evacuation of Mexico was completed, Grant married, in August 1848, Miss Julia Dent, to whom he had been engaged more than four years. For two years the young couple lived at Detroit in Michigan, where Grant was now stationed; he was then ordered to the Pacific coast. It was settled that Mrs. Grant should, during his absence, live with her own family in St. Louis. The regiment went first to Aspinwall, then to California and Oregon. In 1853 Grant became captain, but he had now two children, and saw no chance of supporting his family on his pay as an army officer. He determined to resign, and in the following year he did so. He left the Pacific coast, he tells us, very much attached to it, and with the full intention of one day making his home there, an intention which he did not abandon until, in the winter of 1863-4, Congress passed the Act appointing him Lieutenant-General of the armies of the United States. His
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e movements of the Army of the Potomac to Meade for execution, and to avoid the necessity of having to give direct orders himself, he established his headquarters close to Meade's whenever he could. Meade's position, however, was undoubtedly a somewhat embarrassing one; but its embarrassment was not increased by soreness on his part, or by want of delicacy on Grant's. In the West, the great objects to be attained by Sherman were the defeat of Johnston and his army, and the occupation of Atlanta. These objects he accomplished, proceeding afterwards to execute his brilliant and famous march to Savannah and the sea, sweeping the whole State of Georgia. In the East, the opposing forces stood between the Federal and Confederate capitals, and substantially in the same relations to each other as when the war began three years before. President Lincoln told Grant, when he first saw him in private, that although he had never professed to know how campaigns should be conducted, and never
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
848 was signed the treaty which gave to the United States Texas with the Rio Grande for its boundary, and the whole territory then included in New Mexico and Upper California. For New Mexico and California, however, the Americans paid a sum of fifteen millions of dollars. Grant marks with sagacity and justness the causes and eCalifornia, however, the Americans paid a sum of fifteen millions of dollars. Grant marks with sagacity and justness the causes and effects of the Mexican war. As the North grew in numbers and population, the South required more territory to counterbalance it; to maintain through this wide territory the institution of slavery, it required to have control of the national Government. With great energy and ability, it obtained this control; it acquired Texas and Pacific coast. It was settled that Mrs. Grant should, during his absence, live with her own family in St. Louis. The regiment went first to Aspinwall, then to California and Oregon. In 1853 Grant became captain, but he had now two children, and saw no chance of supporting his family on his pay as an army officer. He determined
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
of the Confederate army, who claimed to own a horse or mule, take the animal to his home. Again Lee remarked that this would have a happy effect. At half-past 4 Grant could telegraph to the Secretary of War at Washington: General Lee surrendered the army of Northern Virginia this afternoon. As soon as the news of the surrender became known, Grant's army began to fire a salute of a hundred guns. Grant instantly stopped it. The war was at an end. Johnston surrendered to Sherman in North Carolina. President Lincoln visited Richmond, which had been occupied by the Army of the Potomac the day after the Confederate Government abandoned it. The President on his return to Washington invited Grant, who also had now gone thither, to accompany him to the theatre on the evening of the 14th of April. Grant declined, because he was to go off that evening to visit his children who were at school in New Jersey; when he reached Philadelphia, he heard that the President and Mr. Seward had bee
Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
was not more than one person could do, and not enough to support two families. So he withdrew from the co-partnership with Boggs, and in May 1860 removed to Galena, Illinois, and took a clerkship in a leather shop there belonging to his father. Politics now began to interest him, and his reflexions on them at the moment when tave furnished the entire number faster than arms could have been supplied to them, if it had been necessary. As soon as news of the call for volunteers reached Galena, where Grant lived, the citizens were summoned to meet at the Court House in the evening. The Court House was crammed. Grant, though a comparative stranger, was embarrassment and some prompting, I made out to announce the object of the meeting. Speeches followed; then volunteers were called for to form the company which Galena had to furnish. The company was raised, and the officers and non-commissioned officers were elected, before the meeting adjourned. Grant declined the captaincy
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
wn part, to the main field of the war. At first, however, he was appointed to the command of the Military division of the Mississippi, and after fighting a severe and successful battle at Chattanooga in November (1863), relieved that place and Knoxville, which the Confederates were threatening. President Lincoln, who had daily, almost hourly, been telegraphing to him to remember Burnside, to do something for Burnside, besieged in Knoxville, was overjoyed. I wish, he wrote to Grant, to tenderKnoxville, was overjoyed. I wish, he wrote to Grant, to tender you, and all under your command, my more than thanks, my profoundest gratitude, for the skill, courage and perseverance with which you and they, over so great difficulties, have effected this important object. God bless you all! Congress voted him thanks and a gold medal for his achievements at Vicksburg and Chattanooga. In the dead of the winter, with the thermometer below zero, he made an excursion into Kentucky, and had the pleasure of finding the people along his route, both in Tennes
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
If some one else had been colonel, and I had been lieutenant-colonel, I do not think I would have felt any trepidation. Before we were prepared to cross the Mississippi River at Quincy, my anxiety was relieved; for the men of the besieged regiment came straggling into the town. I am inclined to think both sides got frightened andom Cairo. By the 1st of November he had 20,000 well-drilled men under his command. In November-he fought a smart action at Belmont, on the western bank of the Mississippi, with the object of preventing the Confederates who were in strong force at Columbus in Kentucky, on the eastern bank, from detaching troops to the West. He sumy had been pressed, and at his success in saving his entire army. But Corinth was evacuated; the naval forces of the North took Memphis, and now held the Mississippi River from its source to that point; New Orleans and Baton Rouge had fallen into their possession. The Confederates at the West were now narrowed down, for als co
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