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Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
e enemy, who was evidently glad to be let alone. Among the prisoners taken was a surgeon living in St. Charles County. He was immediately released, and Dr. Melcher accompanied him to the rebel Generals, arranging for the return of our wagons to bring in our wounded and dead. Lieutenant-Colonel Horace H. Brand, of the First regiment, Sixth Division, who commanded the rebel force at Booneville, and who said he was now acting as aid to General Price, was taken prisoner early in the day. The Illinois Twentieth made themselves useful by guarding the prisoners. One of them had a horse shot under him. When General Siegel, who commanded the eastern division, heard the roar of Totten's artillery, he at once attacked the enemy in his quarter, driving him half a mile, and taking possession of his camp extending westward to the Fayetteville road. Here a terrible fire was poured into his ranks by a regiment which he had permitted to advance within a few paces of him, supposing it to be the Iow
St. Charles County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
efforts crowned with success, and again drove them with great loss down the slope on the south side of the hill. Captain Totten's ammunition was now nearly exhausted, and placing Dubois' battery upon the hill at the north end of the valley, Major Sturgis ordered the ambulances to move toward town. The infantry and Totten's full battery followed in good order and were not pursued by the enemy, who was evidently glad to be let alone. Among the prisoners taken was a surgeon living in St. Charles County. He was immediately released, and Dr. Melcher accompanied him to the rebel Generals, arranging for the return of our wagons to bring in our wounded and dead. Lieutenant-Colonel Horace H. Brand, of the First regiment, Sixth Division, who commanded the rebel force at Booneville, and who said he was now acting as aid to General Price, was taken prisoner early in the day. The Illinois Twentieth made themselves useful by guarding the prisoners. One of them had a horse shot under him. Whe
Rock Creek, Menard County, Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
d brave man. Others will report the losses sustained by the Confederate forces; I shall willingly confine myself to the losses within my own army. Among those who fell mortally wounded upon the battle-field, none deserve a dearer place in the memory of Missourians than Richard Hanson Weightman, Colonel commanding the First brigade of the second division of the army. Taking up arms at the very beginning of this unhappy contest, he had already done distinguished services at the battle of Rock Creek, where he commanded the State forces after the death of the lamented Holloway, and at Carthage, where he won unfading laurels by the display of extraordinary coolness, courage, and skill. He fell at the head of his brigade, wounded in three places, and died just as the victorious shout of our army began to rise upon the air. Here, too, died in the discharge of his duty, Col. Ben. Brown, of Ray County, President of the Senate, a good man and true. Brig.-Gen. Slack's division suffered
Woods (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
County Squadron. Report of the National loss. The official reports of the fight at Wilson's Creek make up the following result:  Killed.Wounded.Miss'g. Capt. Plummer's Battery,19529 Capt. Elliot's Co. D, 1st Cav'y,013 Capt. Dubois' Battery,021 First Missouri Volunteers,7620811 Capt. Steele's Battery,15442 Capt. Carr's Co. I, 1st Cav'y,004 First Kansas Volunteers,7718720 Second Kansas Volunteers,5596 Capt. Totten's Co. F, 2d Art'y,470 Col. Siegel's Brigade,1520231 Capt. Wood's Co. Ks. Rangers,010 Capt. Clark Wright's Co. Dade County Home Guard,020 First Iowa Volunteers121384   Total,223721292 Secession official reports. General Price's report. Headquarters Missouri State Guard, Springfield, August 12, 1861. To His Excellency, Claiborne F. Jackson, Governor of the State of Missouri: I have the honor to submit to your Excellency the following report of the operations of the army under my command, at and immediately preceding the battle of Springfi
Oakhill (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
ndered valuable service under many disadvantages. I desire, especially, to bring to your notice J. P. Orr, of Paris, Mo., who bore our standard through the heat of the conflict, though badly wounded, and having his colors torn into shreds by the bullets of the enemy. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, John B. Clark, Brigadier-General, Third District M. S. G. Ben. McCulloch's despatch. Springfield, Mo., via little Rock, Ark., Aug. 12. Hon. L. P. Walker: The battle of Oakhill has been fought, and we have gained a great victory over the enemy, commanded by Gen. N. Lyon. The battle was fought ten miles from Springfield. The enemy were nine or ten thousand strong; our force was about the same. The battle lasted six and a half hours. The enemy were repulsed and driven from the field, with the loss of six pieces of artillery, several hundred stands of small-arms, eight hundred killed, one thousand wounded, and three hundred prisoners. Gen. Lyon was killed, and man
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
left one gun on the field and retreated to Springfield, where, at three o'clock in the morning of t on the prairie, we continued our march to Springfield. It should be here remembered that, justBates being sick, united with the forces at Springfield, under command of Gen. Lyon, and commenced manded the rear guard on the retreat toward Springfield, but saw nothing of the enemy. It was evidld go out and circle round the enemy toward Springfield. We then had my company, (fifty-six men,) rt. Headquarters Missouri State Guard, Springfield, August 12, 1861. To His Excellency, Claiboed in the withdrawal of the entire force to Springfield. The General had intended moving his forcebut he must do so again. Before we reached Springfield it was daylight. An ambush was prepared a ht, even against such great odds, than that Springfield should fall without a struggle. After red in this battle, will be permitted to have Springfield emblazoned on their colors, as a distinguis[47 more...]
Cassville (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
egan to move my command from its encampment on Cowskin Prairie, in McDonald County, on the 25th of July, toward Cassville, in Barry County, at which place it had been agreed between Gens. McCulloch, Pearce, and myself, that our respective forces, together with those of Brig.-Gen. McBride, should be concentrated, preparatory to a forward movement. We reached Cassville on Sunday, the 28th of July, and on the next day effected a junction with the armies of Gens. McCulloch and Pearce. The combined armies were then put under marching orders, and the First Division, Gen. McCulloch commanding, left Cassville on the 1st of August, upon the road to this city. The Second Division, under Gen. Pearce, of Arkansas, left on the 1st day of August; cond Division, which embraced the greater portion of my infantry, and encamped with it some twelve miles north-west of Cassville. The next morning, a messenger from Gen. McCulloch informed me that he had reason to believe that the enemy were in fo
Fayetteville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
nfantry advanced toward the point where the Fayetteville road crosses Wilson's Creek, and the two caire against us--one in front, placed on the Fayetteville road, and the other upon the hill upon whic to be the Iowa regiment, advanced from the Fayetteville road and attacked our right. It is imposp toward the west and going south along the Fayetteville road, the point where we struck the camp beuntered a concealed battery, on or near the Fayetteville road, into which ours had forked. The acti. It was then decided to move south on the Fayetteville road till we could go out and circle round thousand were five miles from town, on the Fayetteville road, under command of Major Sturgis, of th make a junction with Siegel on or near the Fayetteville road. Before he had time to give the necesbut found it unsafe to attempt to cross the Fayetteville road, and seeing the army retreating, we joeastern camp, chasing them up as far as the Fayetteville road. Here he was met by a regiment unifor[4 more...]
Wilson's Creek (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
f Springfield, fought on the 10th inst. on Wilson's Creek, some ten miles south of the city, between the Home Guard on his left, were to cross Wilson's Creek, and move toward the front, keeping pace w submit to you the report of the battle at Wilson's Creek, so far as the troops under my command wertention to attack the enemy in his camp at Wilson's Creek, on the morning of the 10th; that the attad of Gen. Lyon, and commenced the march to Wilson's Creek, twelve miles distant. Arriving within thr the field of battle, toward their camp on Wilson's Creek. After this we were left unmolested, and enemy would try to cut us off in crossing Wilson's Creek, and that the infantry and artillery shouls. The official reports of the fight at Wilson's Creek make up the following result:  Killed.WEarly the next morning we moved forward to Wilson's Creek, ten miles southwest of Springfield, wherom view by a hill jutting into an angle of Wilson's Creek, were before us, presenting as animated ap[10 more...]
Dade (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
he official reports of the fight at Wilson's Creek make up the following result:  Killed.Wounded.Miss'g. Capt. Plummer's Battery,19529 Capt. Elliot's Co. D, 1st Cav'y,013 Capt. Dubois' Battery,021 First Missouri Volunteers,7620811 Capt. Steele's Battery,15442 Capt. Carr's Co. I, 1st Cav'y,004 First Kansas Volunteers,7718720 Second Kansas Volunteers,5596 Capt. Totten's Co. F, 2d Art'y,470 Col. Siegel's Brigade,1520231 Capt. Wood's Co. Ks. Rangers,010 Capt. Clark Wright's Co. Dade County Home Guard,020 First Iowa Volunteers121384   Total,223721292 Secession official reports. General Price's report. Headquarters Missouri State Guard, Springfield, August 12, 1861. To His Excellency, Claiborne F. Jackson, Governor of the State of Missouri: I have the honor to submit to your Excellency the following report of the operations of the army under my command, at and immediately preceding the battle of Springfield. I began to move my command from its encampmen
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