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Simon B. Buckner (search for this): chapter 45
urn to drag us in chains at the feet of a relentless despotism, which is already pressing heavily upon themselves. When in the hour of our country's peril the extreme North slunk away from the raging contest, thousands of Kentuckians poured into the frozen North to fight on British soil the battles of New England. In return she sends us her hosts of fanatics to despoil us of our homes and of our liberties, and through William H. Seward she invites the outcasts of all nations to join in the carnival of blood. Let us once more fling to the breeze the proud standard of Kentucky. In every valley and on every hill-top let its folds be kissed by the breezes of Heaven. Let our lone star shine, an emblem of hope, from the deep sky-blue of our banner, over the brothers who join in the grasp of friendship; and let the soldier's motto of our State bespeak, under the Providence of God, the strength of the cause which He commits to our hands. S. B. Buckner. Russellville, Ky., Sept. 12, 1861.
from which it was hoped we would not awake. We have been told that the armies of despotism which are to encamp upon our soil will not crush a petal of the most delicate flower, or bruise a blade of grass that decorates our fields; yet wherever they have gone, though in some instances commanded by soldiers unsurpassed in the best qualities of men, their course is marked by desolation, and lighted by the flames of burning fields and houses. It might rather be said of them, as of the hosts of Attila, that where they once pass the grass never grows. The President promised peace to our mother, Virginia; he promised peace to our daughter, Missouri; he now sings in our ears the delusive sound. It is the peace which reigns in his water-girt Bastiles; it is the peace which is found in the graves of his victims. Freemen of Kentucky! we have been slow to oppose the usurpations of Abraham Lincoln. We have heard his promises that he would observe the neutrality of Kentucky, and we have hea
William H. Seward (search for this): chapter 45
s were rescued by ours from the tomahawk and the scalping knife return to drag us in chains at the feet of a relentless despotism, which is already pressing heavily upon themselves. When in the hour of our country's peril the extreme North slunk away from the raging contest, thousands of Kentuckians poured into the frozen North to fight on British soil the battles of New England. In return she sends us her hosts of fanatics to despoil us of our homes and of our liberties, and through William H. Seward she invites the outcasts of all nations to join in the carnival of blood. Let us once more fling to the breeze the proud standard of Kentucky. In every valley and on every hill-top let its folds be kissed by the breezes of Heaven. Let our lone star shine, an emblem of hope, from the deep sky-blue of our banner, over the brothers who join in the grasp of friendship; and let the soldier's motto of our State bespeak, under the Providence of God, the strength of the cause which He commi
S. B. Buckner (search for this): chapter 45
Doc. 44. General Buckner's address September 12, 1861. The following address to the freemen of Kentucky was picked up by a Union soldier on the late battle field near Mill Spring: To the Freemen of Kentucky: The condition of the country renders it unnecessary that I should offer any apology for addressing you. An issue has been forced upon every citizen of Kentucky by the edict of Abraham Lincoln. We are told that we must be for or against him. We must give our active support to his arbitrary acts, or we must oppose them. We must aid him in overthrowing the Constitution of the United States, or we must oppose his usurpations. We must aid him in building upon the ruins of the fair fabric of constitutional liberty a despotic authority as arbitrary as that of an Oriental despot, or we must battle like men for the preservation of the principles of liberty guaranteed by the Constitution. We must be his instruments to drag from their homes, and immure in his numerous dungeons,
September 12th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 45
Doc. 44. General Buckner's address September 12, 1861. The following address to the freemen of Kentucky was picked up by a Union soldier on the late battle field near Mill Spring: To the Freemen of Kentucky: The condition of the country renders it unnecessary that I should offer any apology for addressing you. An issue has been forced upon every citizen of Kentucky by the edict of Abraham Lincoln. We are told that we must be for or against him. We must give our active support to his anival of blood. Let us once more fling to the breeze the proud standard of Kentucky. In every valley and on every hill-top let its folds be kissed by the breezes of Heaven. Let our lone star shine, an emblem of hope, from the deep sky-blue of our banner, over the brothers who join in the grasp of friendship; and let the soldier's motto of our State bespeak, under the Providence of God, the strength of the cause which He commits to our hands. S. B. Buckner. Russellville, Ky., Sept. 12, 1861.
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