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ght of the 13th instant, consisting of the first launch, and first, second, and third cutters, under the commands of Lieutenant Russell, Sproston, Blake, and Midshipman Steece, respectively, assisted by Captain Reynolds, of the marines, Assistant-Surgeon Kennedy, Assistant-Engineer White, Gunner Horton, and Midshipmen Forrest and Hhave to be encountered. Lieutenant Russell had charge of the expedition, and, with Lieutenant Blake, was to attack the vessel, while Lieutenant Sproston and Midshipman Steece spiked the guns. The attack was made on the morning of the 14th instant, at half-past 3 o'clock. The schooner, named the Judah, was found moored to the whn and gunner Horton were able, after considerable search, to find it, the party becoming separated in the darkness. No opposition was made to their landing; Midshipman Steece, with his command, had gone to the aid of those on the schooner, where he performed valuable service. Very fortunately, only one man was found in charge of
John H. Russell (search for this): chapter 50
first launch, and first, second, and third cutters, under the commands of Lieutenant Russell, Sproston, Blake, and Midshipman Steece, respectively, assisted by Captaier, even in face of the fearful odds which would have to be encountered. Lieutenant Russell had charge of the expedition, and, with Lieutenant Blake, was to attack tis shoulder, and midshipman Higginson had the end of his thumb shot off. Lieutenants Russell and Blake had narrow escapes, the flesh of each being grazed by one or m Colorado on the night of the 13th of September, under the command of Lieutenant John H. Russell, of the navy, to destroy the rebel privateer Judah, moored at the whaicer Wm. W. Mckean, Commanding Gulf Blockading Squadron. Promotion of Lieutenant Russell. Navy Department, October 4, 1861. Lieutenant John H. Russell, U. S.Lieutenant John H. Russell, U. S. frigate Colorado, Gulf Blockading Squadron: sir: Transmitted herewith is a copy of a communication from the department, of this date, to Flag-officer McKean, comm
Doc. 49. destruction of the privateer Judah, September 13, 1861. Flag officer Mervine's report. United States flagship Colorado, off Fort Pickens, September 15, 1861. sir: I have the honor to inform you that a boat expedition was fitted out from this ship on the night of the 13th instant, consisting of the first launch, and first, second, and third cutters, under the commands of Lieutenant Russell, Sproston, Blake, and Midshipman Steece, respectively, assisted by Captain Reynolds, of the marines, Assistant-Surgeon Kennedy, Assistant-Engineer White, Gunner Horton, and Midshipmen Forrest and Higginson. The whole force detailed consisted of about one hundred men, officers, sailors, and marines. The object of the expedition was the destruction of a schooner which lay off the Pensacola Navy Yard, supposed to be fitting out as a privateer, and the spiking of a gun, in battery, at the southeast end of the yard. The movements of the schooner had been assiduously watched for
instant, consisting of the first launch, and first, second, and third cutters, under the commands of Lieutenant Russell, Sproston, Blake, and Midshipman Steece, respectively, assisted by Captain Reynolds, of the marines, Assistant-Surgeon Kennedy, Asred. Lieutenant Russell had charge of the expedition, and, with Lieutenant Blake, was to attack the vessel, while Lieutenant Sproston and Midshipman Steece spiked the guns. The attack was made on the morning of the 14th instant, at half-past 3 ohas drifted down opposite Fort Barrancas, where she sunk. Of the party assigned to the spiking of the gun, only Lieutenant Sproston and gunner Horton were able, after considerable search, to find it, the party becoming separated in the darkness. service. Very fortunately, only one man was found in charge of the gun, and he immediately levelled his piece at Lieutenant Sproston, but was shot down by gunner Horton before he could obtain certain aim. Both pieces exploded simultaneously. The
E. K. Osborne (search for this): chapter 50
oss on our side. I have to report as killed by shots from the cross-trees of the schooner, while the boats were approaching, boatswain's mate Charles H. Lamphere and John R. Herring, seaman and captain of the howitzer, two of the best men in our ship; and marine John Smith — the first man to board the schooner, and who behaved most gallantly — was, by a sad mistake, having lost his distinguishing mark, killed by one of our own men. We have wounded, probably mortally, seaman R. Clark and E. K. Osborne; severely, nine other seamen. Captain Reynolds received a severe contusion on his shoulder, and midshipman Higginson had the end of his thumb shot off. Lieutenants Russell and Blake had narrow escapes, the flesh of each being grazed by one or more musket balls. It is not an easy task to select individual instances of bravery or daring where all behaved so gallantly. The officers unite in giving great credit to the coolness and bravery with which they were supported by the men, and t
Henry B. McKean (search for this): chapter 50
on is a painful feature of it; but the memory of those brave men should not be lost in the hearts of all true patriots, but be ever cherished therein. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. Flag-officer Wm. W. Mckean, Commanding Gulf Blockading Squadron. Promotion of Lieutenant Russell. Navy Department, October 4, 1861. Lieutenant John H. Russell, U. S. frigate Colorado, Gulf Blockading Squadron: sir: Transmitted herewith is a copy of a communication from the department, of this date, to Flag-officer McKean, commanding Gulf blockading squadron, in relation to the successful boat expedition despatched under your command to destroy the rebel privateer Judah. For your gallantry on this occasion the department designs to assign you to the command of one of the new gunboats, and you are therefore detached from the Colorado, and you will proceed to Washington, D. C., and report yourself in person to the department. I am, respectfully, Gideon Welles.
utters, under the commands of Lieutenant Russell, Sproston, Blake, and Midshipman Steece, respectively, assisted by Captain Reynolds, of the marines, Assistant-Surgeon Kennedy, Assistant-Engineer White, Gunner Horton, and Midshipmen Forrest and Higginson. The whole force detailed consisted of about one hundred men, officers, sailors, and marines. The object of the expedition was the destruction of a schooner which lay off the Pensacola Navy Yard, supposed to be fitting out as a privateer, andtake, having lost his distinguishing mark, killed by one of our own men. We have wounded, probably mortally, seaman R. Clark and E. K. Osborne; severely, nine other seamen. Captain Reynolds received a severe contusion on his shoulder, and midshipman Higginson had the end of his thumb shot off. Lieutenants Russell and Blake had narrow escapes, the flesh of each being grazed by one or more musket balls. It is not an easy task to select individual instances of bravery or daring where all behave
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 50
ing charge of fitting out the expedition to the minutest detail. It is to his thoughtfulness that a great portion of its success must be ascribed. W. M. To Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. The Secretary of the Navy issued the following acknowledgment of the gallantry of the Federal forces: Navy De memory of those brave men should not be lost in the hearts of all true patriots, but be ever cherished therein. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. Flag-officer Wm. W. Mckean, Commanding Gulf Blockading Squadron. Promotion of Lieutenant Russell. Navy Department, October 4, 1861. Lieutenant John stroy the rebel privateer Judah. For your gallantry on this occasion the department designs to assign you to the command of one of the new gunboats, and you are therefore detached from the Colorado, and you will proceed to Washington, D. C., and report yourself in person to the department. I am, respectfully, Gideon Welles.
Charles H. Lamphere (search for this): chapter 50
canister from their howitzers into the yard, with what result it is impossible to say. Three of the enemy are known to have been killed, and our officers are confident the number is much larger. The boats then returned to the ship, arriving there about daylight. But, sir, I am grieved to report that this brilliant affair was not unattended by loss on our side. I have to report as killed by shots from the cross-trees of the schooner, while the boats were approaching, boatswain's mate Charles H. Lamphere and John R. Herring, seaman and captain of the howitzer, two of the best men in our ship; and marine John Smith — the first man to board the schooner, and who behaved most gallantly — was, by a sad mistake, having lost his distinguishing mark, killed by one of our own men. We have wounded, probably mortally, seaman R. Clark and E. K. Osborne; severely, nine other seamen. Captain Reynolds received a severe contusion on his shoulder, and midshipman Higginson had the end of his thumb
William W. McKean (search for this): chapter 50
ent will cherish the recollection of the exploit, and desires you to express to the officers, seamen, and marines who participated in it, its highest admiration of their conduct. The loss to the service and to their relatives and friends of those who fell in the expedition is a painful feature of it; but the memory of those brave men should not be lost in the hearts of all true patriots, but be ever cherished therein. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. Flag-officer Wm. W. Mckean, Commanding Gulf Blockading Squadron. Promotion of Lieutenant Russell. Navy Department, October 4, 1861. Lieutenant John H. Russell, U. S. frigate Colorado, Gulf Blockading Squadron: sir: Transmitted herewith is a copy of a communication from the department, of this date, to Flag-officer McKean, commanding Gulf blockading squadron, in relation to the successful boat expedition despatched under your command to destroy the rebel privateer Judah. For your gallantry on thi
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