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Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
the part of the secretaries in their attempts to interpret this law so as to sell the loan. The first thing said about the probability that this debt would be paid in gold was in the answer of Secretary Chase to a letter sent him from abroad — Frankfort, I believe. It was said in that letter — I do not give the words, but the substance--It is not understood here in Frankfort that these bonds are payable in gold. If it should be so understood they would bring a much higher price. Why was it Frankfort that these bonds are payable in gold. If it should be so understood they would bring a much higher price. Why was it not so understood? Because a foreign lawyer reading the act would never think of such a thing for a moment. The bonds were selling — for what? For forty cents on the dollar, and that at a time when the Confederate loan was at a premium in Europe. Now, I will not think so meanly of this country as to believe it could be supposed these bonds were payable in gold, and then were at this discount even in Europe, which was against us. And I will not think so meanly of this nation as to believe <
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
party won, the preservation of the tariff was assured. I thought I would see, by a fusion of the greenback party and the Democrats in the Western States and in New Jersey and New York, if enough votes could not be procured to prevent the election of Mr. Cleveland by getting enough electoral votes for the fusion ticket. I labored assiduously throughout the campaign to this end. It was supposed that a fusion could be made in Michigan, Indiana, West Virginia, and New Jersey; the fusion was made in Michigan, and we voted a generous ticket with the understanding that the electors should represent the respective parties to the fusion in the proportion of thediana the fusion failed, those having charge of the fusion party in that State, for some reason never explained to me, having given way. In West Virginia and in New Jersey the fusion also failed. The only hope was then in my drawing enough votes from the Democratic party from the State of New York to prevent its throwing its vote
Detroit (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
s could have been done; but Mr. Kelly was taken sick almost immediately after the election and could not attend to business. With him to aid me I could have proven the case; without him I could not bring in the witnesses against the great influence of a successful administration and would fail of proof, and therefore the investigation was not instituted. But I felt certain then, as I do now, that there were votes to the number of several thousand that were wrongly counted in that election. Since that time I have taken no part in politics, save that in the campaign of 1888 I made a single speech in Boston in behalf of the tariff, and I repeated that speech at Detroit, at the request of President Harrison. Michigan was regarded as a doubtful State, as another attempt was being made to have a fusion between the Democrats and greenbackers in that campaign, such as was carried out in the previous one, and I used all the influence I could to prevent its being done. Decorative Motif.
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
was by the act of the Confederate Congress to be devoted to the purchase of Confederate governmental supplies. There is a curious fact that I desire to state in regard to blockade running and the capture of blockade runners: An examination of the captures will show a much larger number of the higher class blockade runners captured when coming out again from blockaded ports than when running in. A Scotch runner could be loaded up with supplies of various sorts and run in, we will say at Wilmington, eluding our blockaders by its swiftness. Because of the necessities of the South the cargo of supplies was sold to them at enormous prices and paid for in cotton at ten or fifteen cents a pound, with which the vessel was then loaded to its utmost capacity. That cotton if brought to Europe or a Northern port would bring a dollar a pound, so that the cargo was exceedingly valuable — very much more valuable than the cargo brought in. Every ton would be worth say $2,000, or a hundred tons $
America (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
hat blood sprinkles even the hem of my garments. Early in the administration of President Johnson, under Mr. Seward, Secretary of State, attempts were made to negotiate with England for reparation for the acts — injurious to us — committed by her during the war. These subsequently became known as the Alabama claims, after the captures by the rebel cruiser Alabama and her consorts of our vessels during the war, which drove our commerce substantially from the seas. When the war broke out, America's commerce was the second largest in the world, and not far behind that of Great Britain. When the war closed, our flag had been substantially driven from the ocean. The ports of Great Britain and its colonies had been made depots from which arms, ammunition, and every manner of supplies were shipped to the Confederates. Not to any considerable extent was this the case with the ports of other nations, save, perhaps, of Cuba. It compelled us to establish, Wendell Phillips. at an eno
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 22
e system of terminal annuities resorted to in England when the government was under pressure to borhich such estates could be held together. Great Britain still retains that system, and great estats is an excellent way to borrow money, and in England the government issues annuities when it must ially driven from the ocean. The ports of Great Britain and its colonies had been made depots frome war to a dollar a pound. It must be had in England or the laborers of her cotton manufactories warve. The steamship builders of Scotland and England supplied large numbers of blockade runners ofration of President Grant. A commission from England was sent to Washington to negotiate it. A trereaty. I said our claims as a nation against England are simply incalculable, and the only negotia of statecraft, we should say in substance to England: You have done more against our country than to the point of asking proper reparation from England. We had allowed to us by the Geneva tribunal[4 more...]
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 22
commerce substantially from the seas. When the war broke out, America's commerce was the second largest in the world, and not far behind that of Great Britain. When the war closed, our flag had been substantially driven from the ocean. The ports of Great Britain and its colonies had been made depots from which arms, ammunition, and every manner of supplies were shipped to the Confederates. Not to any considerable extent was this the case with the ports of other nations, save, perhaps, of Cuba. It compelled us to establish, Wendell Phillips. at an enormous cost, and maintain for four years, blockading fleets whose business was simply to prevent the running in and out of Confederate ports of vessels loaded with arms, ammunition, provisions, and every class of smuggled goods. As I have stated before, Southern cotton had advanced from ten cents a pound at the beginning of the war to a dollar a pound. It must be had in England or the laborers of her cotton manufactories would s
Williams (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ebt secured by mortgage of the whole property of the United States, without depreciation. Our debt now is $2,500,000,000, about $2,200,000,000 of it interest-bearing. Suppose we issue our legal-tender greenbacks, as I will call them for convenience, and buy up or redeem our interest-bearing debt that is due to the amount of $1,000,000,000. Then our debt stands, James F. Wilson, Iowa. Geo. S. Boutwell, Mass. John A. Logan, El. Benj. F. Butler, Mass. Thaddeus Stevens, Penn. Thos. Williams, Penn. Jno. A. Bingham, Ohio: managers of the House of Representatives of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson. $1,000,000,000 of non-interest-bearing debt, and $1,500,000,000 of interest-bearing debt. Now, if that $1,000,000,000 of circulation is too much, i. e., more than is needed for currency, I agree with the gentleman from Maine that it will be depreciated. But what is too much? Too much is more than will be absorbed. as currency in the business of the country. That is to sa
Charlestown, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ow pray for me. During my term of office I appointed a few executive officers and some judicial ones to which my council would not consent. I appointed some other officers to whom they were obliged to advise and consent. Massachusetts, as it may be remembered, was a strong anti-slavery State. That very humane but rather aggressive doctrine absolutely flamed over the State for years, but no governor had ever appointed a negro to any prominent office. In the judiciary district of Charlestown, a portion of Boston, the office of judge became vacant, and as we had as a member of the bar in Boston a very reputable and well-read lawyer who was a negro, a Democrat, and formerly a member of the legislature, Edwin G. Walker, Esq., I nominated him for the position, but my Republican council would not advise and consent he should have his commission. I then looked around for another reputable negro lawyer who should be a Republican in politics, and finding one, George L. Ruffin, Esq.,
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
lped themselves, not us. It is said they loaned money to the government. How did they do it? Let me state the way a national bank got itself into existence in New England during the war, when gold was 200, and five-twenties were at par, in currency, or nearly that. A company of men got together $300,000 in national bank bills, a of capital stock paid in; they have been in operation on an average of less than four years; they have divided from twelve to twenty per cent., about twelve in New England and from fifteen to twenty per cent. where money is scarcer and the rate of interest rules higher. In addition to these, dividends take their own statement: suad been conferred on me several years before by the rival of Harvard college in Massachusetts, Williams College; and I now hold that degree in colleges in three New England States, and I can read my diploma in the Latin tongue, as perhaps one half my predecessors in the executive office who got the degree could not do. The treat
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