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Muscle Shoals (Alabama, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 21
Nashville, and that a good deal of further delay might reasonably be counted on. I also rested with much confidence on the fact that the Tennessee River below Muscle Shoals was strongly patrolled by gunboats, and that the reach of the river above Muscle Shoals, from Decatur as high up as our railroad at Bridgeport, was also guardeMuscle Shoals, from Decatur as high up as our railroad at Bridgeport, was also guarded by gunboats, so that Hood, to cross over, would be compelled to select a point inaccessible to these gunboats. He actually did choose such a place, at the old railroad-piers, four miles above Florence, Alabama, which is below Muscle Shoals and above Colbert Shoals. On the 31st of October Forrest made his appearance on the TenMuscle Shoals and above Colbert Shoals. On the 31st of October Forrest made his appearance on the Tennessee River opposite Johnsonville (whence a new railroad led to Nashville), and with his cavalry and field-pieces actually crippled and captured two gunboats with five of our transports, a feat of arms which, I confess, excited my admiration. There is no doubt that the month of October closed to us looking decidedly squally; bu
Allatoona (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 21
of the railroad, over-looking the village of Allatoona, and the warehouses, in which were stored ov could plainly see the smoke of battle about Allatoona, and hear the faint reverberation of the can at Dallas and the detachment then assailing Allatoona. The rest of the army was directed straight for Allatoona, northwest, distant eighteen miles. The signal-officer on Kenesaw reported that sinc failed to obtain any answer to his call for Allatoona; but, while I was with him, he caught a fainlinois Infantry; started at 8 P. M., reached Allatoona (distant thirty-five miles) at 1 A. M. of th4. Commanding Officer, United States Forces, Allatoona: I have placed the forces under my commanarters Fourth division, Fifteenth Corps, Allatoona, Georgia, 8.30 A. M., October 5, 1864. Major-Gene for their determined and gallant defense of Allatoona, and it is made an example to illustrate theould venture to attack fortified places like Allatoona, Resaca, Decatur, and Nashville; but he did [18 more...]
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 21
Thomas has, and the reserves soon to come to Nashville, and for me to destroy Atlanta and march acran attended the defense of the railroad from Nashville to Atlanta during the year 1864. In persothe 16th I telegraphed to General Thomas, at Nashville: Send me Morgan's and Newton's old divispany General Hood on his disastrous march to Nashville, but took post at Corinth, Mississippi, to cing the excellent forts that already covered Nashville. At Chattanooga, he had General Steedman's m eight to ten thousand, had been ordered to Nashville. To these I proposed at first to add only te Johnsonville (whence a new railroad led to Nashville), and with his cavalry and field-pieces actussary preparations. General Thomas was at Nashville, with Wilson's dismounted cavalry and a massrk at Lexington for the Cumberland River and Nashville. Of course, General. Thomas saw that on hivisions at Paducah, which would surely reach Nashville much sooner than General Hood could possibly[13 more...]
Cassville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 21
eneral Wheeler had been driven out of Middle Tennessee, escaping south across the Tennessee River at Bainbridge; and things looked as though we were to have a period of repose. One day, two citizens, Messrs. Hill and Foster, came into our lines at Decatur, and were sent to my headquarters. They represented themselves as former members of Congress, and particular friends of my brother John Sherman; that Mr. Hill had a son killed in the rebel army as it fell back before us somewhere near Cassville, and they wanted to obtain the body, having learned from a comrade where it was buried. I gave them permission to go by rail to the rear, with a note to the commanding officer, General John E. Smith, at Cartersville, requiring him to furnish them an escort and an ambulance for the purpose. I invited them to take dinner with our mess, and we naturally ran into a general conversation about politics and the devastation and ruin caused by the war. They had seen a part of the country over whi
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 21
nother division to Rome. If I were sure that Savannah would soon be in our possession, I should be ke the movement on Milledgeville, Millen, and Savannah. Hood now rests twenty-four miles south, on o destroy Atlanta and march across Georgia to Savannah or Charleston, breaking roads and doing irrepith our wagons for Milledgeville, Millen, and Savannah. Until we can repopulate Georgia, it is uselneral Thomas, and to march across Georgia for Savannah or Charleston, that I again telegraphed to Geuld be fully twenty-five per cent. I can make Savannah, Charleston, or the mouth of the Chattahooche I construed it to mean, Ossabaw Sound, below Savannah, which was correct. On the 16th I telegrapush into the heart of Georgia and come out at Savannah, destroying all the railroads of the State. f President Lincoln, which I received at Savannah, Georgia, and have at this instant before me, eve and I deliberately prepared for the march to Savannah, distant three hundred miles from Atlanta. A
Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 21
ld strike our railroad nearer us, viz., about Kingston or Marietta. Orders were at once made for ry heavy. A force moving from Stilesboroa to Kingston gives me some anxiety. Tell me where Sherman Allatoona on the 4th, when he telegraphed to Kingston for cars, and a train of thirty empty cars was, from McGuire's; and General Howard's, from Kingston. We all reached Resaca during that night, anof cars, and I transferred my headquarters to Kingston as more central; and from that place, on the gain telegraphed to General Grant. Kingston, Georgia, November 2, 1864. Lieutenant-General U.ectly. On the 2d of November I was at Kingston, Georgia, and my four corps--the Fifteenth, Sevencorps (Seventeenth), and we were receiving at Kingston recruits and returned furlough-men, distributilroad; and General Steedman had come down to Kingston, to take charge of the final evacuation and wnight of the 10th, and next day Corse reached Kingston. On the 11th General Thomas and I interchang[8 more...]
Cartersville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 21
d. I gave them permission to go by rail to the rear, with a note to the commanding officer, General John E. Smith, at Cartersville, requiring him to furnish them an escort and an ambulance for the purpose. I invited them to take dinner with our mese enemy appeared south of the Etowah River at Rome, when I ordered all the armies to march to Kingston, rode myself to Cartersville with the Twenty-third Corps (General Cox), and telegraphed from there to General Thomas at Nashville: It looks to te? He will have an ample force when the reenforcements ordered reach Nashville. I found General John E. Smith at Cartersville, and on the 11th rode on to Kingston, where I had telegraphic communications in all directions. From General Corse,he army. On the 12th, with a full staff, I started from Kingston for Atlanta; and about noon of that day we reached Cartersville, and sat on the edge of a porch to rest, when the telegraph operator, Mr. Van Valkenburg, or Eddy, got the wire down f
Talladega (Alabama, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 21
to get on our road, this side of the Etowah, I shall attack him; but if he goes to the Selma & Talladega road, why will it not do to leave Tennessee to the forces which Thomas has, and the reserves soon to come to Nashville, and for me to destroy Atlanta and march across Georgia to Savannah or Charleston, breaking roads and doing irreparable damage? We cannot remain on the defensive. The Selma & Talladega road herein referred to was an unfinished railroad from Selma, Alabama, through Talladega, to Blue Mountain, a terminus sixty-five miles southwest of Rome and about fifteen miles southeast of Gadsden, where the rebel army could be supplied from the direction of Montgomery and Mobile, and from which point Hood could easily threaten Middle Tennessee. My first impression was, that Hood would make for that point; but by the 3d of October the indications were that he would strike our railroad nearer us, viz., about Kingston or Marietta. Orders were at once made for the Twentie
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 21
s the chief of cavalry to the Army of the Cumberland, and was the senior officer of that arm of service present for duty with me. We had strong railroad guards at Marietta and Kenesaw, Allatoona, Etowah Bridge, Kingston, Rome, Resaca, Dalton, Ringgold, and Chattanooga. All the important bridges were likewise protected by good block-houses, admirably constructed, and capable of a strong defense against cavalry or infantry; and at nearly all the regular railroad-stations we had smaller detachm must eat; we preferred Illinois beef, but mutton would have to answer. Poor fellow! I don't believe he was convinced of the wisdom or wit of my explanation. Very soon after reaching Lafayette we organized a line of supply from Chattanooga to Ringgold by rail, and thence by wagons to our camps about Gaylesville. Meantime, also, Hood had reached the neighborhood of Gadsden, and drew his supplies from the railroad at Blue Mountain. On the 19th of October I telegraphed to General Halleck, at
Blue Mountain (Alabama, United States) (search for this): volume 2, chapter 21
oad herein referred to was an unfinished railroad from Selma, Alabama, through Talladega, to Blue Mountain, a terminus sixty-five miles southwest of Rome and about fifteen miles southeast of Gadsde I think Hood's movements indicate a diversion to the end of the Selma & Talladega road, at Blue Mountain, about sixty miles southwest of Rome, from which he will threaten Kingston, Bridgeport, ands. Reestablish the road, and I will follow Hood wherever he may go. I think he will move to Blue Mountain. We can maintain our men and animals on the country. General Thomas's reply was: so, Hood had reached the neighborhood of Gadsden, and drew his supplies from the railroad at Blue Mountain. On the 19th of October I telegraphed to General Halleck, at Washington: Hood has retll dispositions accordingly. I will go down the Coosa until I am sure that Hood has gone to Blue Mountain. On the 21st of October I reached Gaylesville, had my bivouac in an open field back of t
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