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York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
not be secured, and partly because such a movement was not consistent with the general plan of the campaign which had been decided upon. After the fall of Yorktown and the withdrawal of the great body of the rebel army, it was believed that the abandonment of Norfolk would speedily follow as a necessary consequence. When Gen. McClellan, therefore, on Monday after the fall of Yorktown, telegraphed to Gen. Wool asking for more troops, in order to make an effective pursuit of the rebels up York River, Gen. Wool declined to send any, on the ground that it might become necessary for him to take and hold Norfolk. On Thursday the little steam-tug J. B. White came in from Norfolk, having deserted from the rebel service. She had been sent to bring in a couple of rebel schooners from the mouth of Tanner's Creek; the officers in charge of her being Northern men, and having been long desirous of escaping from the rebel regime, considered this a favorable opportunity for effecting their obje
Old Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
's staff, that the seven prisoners, whom he had marched to the beach, were at his disposal. Their arms were taken away, and on promising to take the oath of allegiance the men were at once dismissed. One of them proved to be Moore himself, who came over to his house, where he found half a dozen of us in full possession, and just preparing to discuss a very comfortable supper which his colored cook had got ready for us. Baltimore American account. Fortress Monroe, May 9, 1862. Old Point this evening presents a very stirring spectacle. About a dozen steamers and transports are loading with troops. They will land on the shore opposite the Rip Raps, and march direct on Norfolk. At the time I commence writing--nine o'clock P. M.--the moon shines so brightly that I am sitting in the open air, in an elevated position, and writing by moonlight. The transports are gathering in the stream, and have on board artillery, cavalry, and infantry, and will soon be prepared to start
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ey found that President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton, on examining the maps, had been led to make a similar exploration and had come to a similar conclusion, though the points at which the parties had struck the shore proved to have been a mile or two apart. The result of all this was that Gen. Wool decided upon an immediate march upon Norfolk from that point, and orders were at once issued to carry it into effect. The steamer Adelaide, which was filled with freight and passengers for Baltimore, was stopped half an hour before her time of sailing, and with half a dozen others, was at once occupied by the infantry and artillery destined for the expedition. They began to embark at about four o'clock, on Friday afternoon, and by midnight several of them had started for the opposite shore. A vigorous bombardment was opened from the Rip Raps upon Sewell's Point, and kept up for two hours, to induce the belief that this was the intended point of debarkation. The steamers crossed ove
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
he general expectation is, that the troops now embarking will have possession of that city before to-morrow night. Ten o'clock P. M.--The expedition has not yet started, the delay being caused by the time required for storing the horses and cannon on the Adelaide. The batteries at the Rip Raps have stopped throwing shells, and all is quiet. The scene in the Roads of the transports steaming about is most beautiful, presenting a panoramic view that is seldom witnessed. Willoughby's point, Va., Saturday Morning, May 10. The troops left during the night, and at daylight could be seen from the wharf landing at Willoughby Point, a short distance from the Rip Raps. Through the influence of Secretary Stanton, I obtained this morning a permit to accompany Gen. Wool and Gen. Mansfield and their staffs to Willoughby's Point, on the steamer Kansas, and here I am on the sacred soil, within eight miles of Norfolk. The point at which we have landed is known as Point Pleasant, one of the
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
and by a countermarch proceeded by the old road to Norfolk, where I arrived safe at five o'clock, when the Mayor and Common Council met me and surrendered the city. The enemy, three thousand strong, with Gen. Huger, had fled but a short time before my arrival. The intrenchments through which I passed had twenty-one guns mounted, which, properly manned, might have made an effective defence. I turned the command over to Brig.-Gen. Viele, and appointed him Military Governor of the city, and then returned to the Fort and reported to the President and Secretary of War. I think it a fair inference that the occupation of Norfolk caused the blowing up of the dreaded Merrimac, and thus secured to us the free use of the James River. The army may, therefore, claim at least some share of this much-desired naval success. I have given you a hasty sketch of this movement, thinking it would be interesting to my friends in New-York. In great haste, most truly yours, John E. Wool.
Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
a large number of shot and shell, as well as many other articles of value stationed at the Navy-Yard, Craney Island, Sewell's Point, and other places. John E. Wool, Major-General Commanding New-York times account. Ocean view, opposite Fortroops was embarked upon the transports lying in the Roads, and all preparations were made with a view to a landing on Sewell's Point during Thursday night. Several of our vessels were sent to shell the Point during the preceding day, and as you have idnight several of them had started for the opposite shore. A vigorous bombardment was opened from the Rip Raps upon Sewell's Point, and kept up for two hours, to induce the belief that this was the intended point of debarkation. The steamers crossd artillery, cavalry, and infantry, and will soon be prepared to start. The Rip Raps are pouring shot and shell into Sewell's Point, and a bright light in the direction of Norfolk indicates that the work of destruction has commenced. President Li
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
etts, Col. Wyman. The remainder of the expedition consists of the Tenth New-York, Col. Bendix; the Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania, Colonel Bailey; the Ninety-ninth New-York, Coast Guards; Major Dodge's battalion of mounted rifles and Capt. Follett's company (D) of the Fourth regular artillery. Gen. Wool and staff remained to supe, and with the immense flame that it threw forth made the scene one of terrible grandeur. Letter from General Wool. In a private letter to a friend in New-York, Gen. Wool wrote: The whole affair of the capture of Norfolk was done in twenty-seven hours. My course was by water twelve miles, and by land thirty-six, on hthe dreaded Merrimac, and thus secured to us the free use of the James River. The army may, therefore, claim at least some share of this much-desired naval success. I have given you a hasty sketch of this movement, thinking it would be interesting to my friends in New-York. In great haste, most truly yours, John E. Wool.
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Doc. 11.-occupation of Norfolk, Va. Report of General Wool. Fortress Monroe, May 12, 1862. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretdry of War: on the ninth of Maytisfied themselves that a landing was perfectly feasible. On returning to Fortress Monroe, they found that President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton, on examining the slightly known shore, without a wharf, early next day. Gen. Wool slept in Fortress Monroe last night — marched with his troops some twenty miles, captured Norfolk, is colored cook had got ready for us. Baltimore American account. Fortress Monroe, May 9, 1862. Old Point this evening presents a very stirring spectaclell around the country, principally the destruction of barracks and camps. Fortress Monroe, May 10, 1862. I have just returned from Point Pleasant. Large reinforhat I could land troops without much trouble at Ocean View, six miles from Fortress Monroe. The Secretary of the Treasury, Mr. Chase, and my aid-de-camp, Col. Cram,
and commenced the march toward Norfolk, with Generals Mansfield and Weber, who proceeded on the direct route by way of Tanner's Creek bridge,able condition. At about one o'clock the leading regiment, under Max Weber, came to the bridge and found it burning, having just been set on The first regiment landed was the Twentieth New-York, known as Max Weber's regiment, who pushed on immediately, under command of Gen. WebeGen. Weber, and were at eight o'clock in the morning picketed within five miles of Norfolk. The First Delaware, Colonel Andrews, pushed forward at nuation of Norfolk is steadily progressing. I just learn that Gen. Max Weber has advanced to within three miles of Norfolk without meeting w under command of Major-Gen. Wool, with Brig.-Generals Mansfield, Max Weber, and Viele. The first division of the troops landed at the Port, (the Twentieth New-York, under Max Weber,) immediately started forward, accompanied by the Independent Lowell artillery company of Capt. Dav
William W. Lamb (search for this): chapter 11
olk at the limits of the city, when they surrendered the city, agreeably to the terms set forth in the resolutions of the Common Council presented by the Mayor, Wm. W. Lamb, which were accepted by me so far as related to the civil rights of its citizens. A copy of the resolutions has been already furnished you. I immediately took Immediately after Gen. Wool left the City Hall, a large concourse of citizens assembled around the City Hall and called loudly for a speech from the Mayor. Mayor Lamb came forward and addressed them briefly, confining himself mainly to a recital of the incidents of the day. He said he had nothing to do with deciding the resulagain taken up, the spires and prominent points of which could be occasionally seen through the thick foliage of the trees. When about a mile from the suburbs, Mayor Lamb, of Norfolk, accompanied by one of the city councilmen, approached the advancing column, bearing a flag of truce, when a halt took place, The Mayor informed
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