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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 41 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 37 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 33 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 29 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 27 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 21 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for David D. Porter or search for David D. Porter in all documents.

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Engagement at Gaines's Landing. Report of rear-admiral D. D. Porter. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, Mound City, June 3, 1864. sir: I have the honor to inclose herewith a report of Acting Ensign H. B. O'Neill, commanding United States steamer Curlew, giving an account of an attack made upon that vessel, oneir stations, and behaved well during the engagement, which lasted about twenty minutes. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Wells, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Report of Acting Ensign H. B. O'Neill. United States steamer Curlew, May omeo, to return and convoy her below where the battery was, which we did, without meeting any further difficulty. This caused a delay in our arrival at Cairo of at least twelve hours. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. B. O'Neill, Acting Ensign, Commanding. Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi Squadron.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Passage of the falls by the fleet. (search)
Passage of the falls by the fleet. Report of rear-admiral D. D. Porter. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, mouth of Red River, May 16, 1864. sirweek. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Additional report of rear-admiral D. D. Porter. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, off mouth of Red River, La., May 19, 1864. sir: In my reportired. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral, Commanding Mississippi Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Congratulatory letter to Pear-Admiral D. D. Porter. Navy Department, May 31, 1864. sir: The Department acknowledges thehole duty nobly and faithfully. Very respectfully, Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding Mississippi Squadron, Cairo, III.
port, will advance again as soon as he is reinforced and adequate supplies are received. The loss of artillery is a trivial matter, as nearly the whole fighting, owing to the nature of the heavily wooded country, must be done by infantry. Admiral Porter's fleet will cooperate as far as possible. The extent of its cooperation depends on the depth of water in Red River. Other battles must soon follow, and glorious victories will be won over the trans-Mississippi rebels. The enemy appearit was remote from the river, and where we could not receive the cooperation of the gunboats. The latest advices from General Steele were that he was within either sixty miles or one day's march of Shreveport, with fifteen thousand men. Admiral Porter, with two monitors and his flag-ship, went up the river from Grand Ecore a week since, it is presumed to operate against the rebel seat of government in Louisiana. Rebel Addresses and orders. The following is General Taylor's address t
d, when the time employed and the numerical force engaged is considered, one of the most daring raids of the war. In my despatch of Monday I mentioned the fact that the expedition, which consisted of detachments from the First, Second, and Fifth United States, Sixth Ohio, Sixth Pennsylvania, First New-York, and First New-Jersey cavalry, in all, one thousand five hundred men, passed through Madison Court-House early that morning. One section of Captain French's battery, commanded by Lieutenant Porter, accompanied the cavalry. The troops were in light marching order, and moved rapidly toward Stannardsville, distant south-west from Madison twelve miles, crossing the Rapidan at Banks's Mills Ford. At Stannardsville the enemy's pickets were discovered, who retired precipitately before our advance. Meeting with no opposition, General Custer pushed forward to the Rivanna River, crossing at Berner's Bridge, a long wooden structure spanning the river at a point distant three or four m
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