hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 640 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 443 19 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 321 3 Browse Search
Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) 296 8 Browse Search
Doc 290 0 Browse Search
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) 278 8 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 276 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 267 3 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 256 0 Browse Search
N. B. Forrest 240 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 44 total hits in 19 results.

1 2
M. D. Graham (search for this): chapter 59
Doc. 57.-General Graham's expedition. General Butler's despatch. Fortress Monroe, Va., January 25, 1864. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: sir: Brigadier-General Graham, by my dirBrigadier-General Graham, by my direction, went with three armed transports and a competent force to the Peninsula, made a landing on the James River, seven miles below Fort Powhatan, known as the Brandon Farms, and captured twenty-twoy gunboats Gen. Jessup, Smith Briggs, and Flora Temple. The whole was under the command of General Graham. Before daylight, on the following morning, the boats had proceeded as far up the James Rivhe men in two bodies, Captain Lee assigned one of them to remain with Lieutenant Bullard, of General Graham's staff, in front of the station, while he with his squad marched around to the rear. Theptures are fully worth twenty thousand dollars. The expedition reflects great credit upon General Graham and Captain Lee, and all the officers and men engaged in it, when we take into consideration
Thomas H. Harris (search for this): chapter 59
mes River as Brandon, (which is near Harrison's Landing,) without the least opposition. From the Gen. Jessup a detachment of men were landed, under charge of Captain Lee, of the Harbor Police. Two other detachments were sent ashore, under Captain Harris, of one of the boats, and Captain Brown, of the Twenty-first connecticut regiment. Supported by the latter, the men of Captain Lee penetrated the interior of the country to the distance of three miles. Here was a signal-station of the rebelsge and provisions was captured, with two overseers. From a plantation near by, about one hundred and thirty negroes, field hands, were taken. These were not the only trophies; for, while these active and exciting operations were going on, Lieutenant Harris, the commander of the Gen. Jessup, captured a blockade-runner schooner heavily laden with tobacco, jewelry, state bonds, and specie, belonging to some Jews. In addition to this, a smaller vessel, a sloop, was taken. The captures are fully
Smith Briggs (search for this): chapter 59
ve Jews, preparing to run the blockade, and returned without the loss of a man. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. A national account. Norfolk, Va., Tuesday, January 26, 1864. One of the most brilliant exploits that has been chronicled for some time past, was accomplished yesterday by some of our troops, whose bravery is only equalled by their patriotism. Late on Sunday afternoon a gunboat expedition started from this city, composed of the army gunboats Gen. Jessup, Smith Briggs, and Flora Temple. The whole was under the command of General Graham. Before daylight, on the following morning, the boats had proceeded as far up the James River as Brandon, (which is near Harrison's Landing,) without the least opposition. From the Gen. Jessup a detachment of men were landed, under charge of Captain Lee, of the Harbor Police. Two other detachments were sent ashore, under Captain Harris, of one of the boats, and Captain Brown, of the Twenty-first connecticut regimen
William R. Brown (search for this): chapter 59
posed of the army gunboats Gen. Jessup, Smith Briggs, and Flora Temple. The whole was under the command of General Graham. Before daylight, on the following morning, the boats had proceeded as far up the James River as Brandon, (which is near Harrison's Landing,) without the least opposition. From the Gen. Jessup a detachment of men were landed, under charge of Captain Lee, of the Harbor Police. Two other detachments were sent ashore, under Captain Harris, of one of the boats, and Captain Brown, of the Twenty-first connecticut regiment. Supported by the latter, the men of Captain Lee penetrated the interior of the country to the distance of three miles. Here was a signal-station of the rebels, which it was their intention to capture. Dividing the men in two bodies, Captain Lee assigned one of them to remain with Lieutenant Bullard, of General Graham's staff, in front of the station, while he with his squad marched around to the rear. The manoeuvre was a complete success.
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 59
Doc. 57.-General Graham's expedition. General Butler's despatch. Fortress Monroe, Va., January 25, 1864. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: sir: Brigadier-General Graham, by my direction, went with three armed transports and a competent force to the Peninsula, made a landing on the James River, seven miles below Fort Powhatan, known as the Brandon Farms, and captured twenty-two of the enemy, seven of the signal corps, and brought away ninety-nine negroes. They also destroyed twenty-four thousand pounds of pork, and large quantities of oats and corn, and captured a sloop and schooner, and two hundred and forty boxes of tobacco, and five Jews, preparing to run the blockade, and returned without the loss of a man. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. A national account. Norfolk, Va., Tuesday, January 26, 1864. One of the most brilliant exploits that has been chronicled for some time past, was accomplished yesterday by some of our troops, whose brave
uary 26, 1864. One of the most brilliant exploits that has been chronicled for some time past, was accomplished yesterday by some of our troops, whose bravery is only equalled by their patriotism. Late on Sunday afternoon a gunboat expedition started from this city, composed of the army gunboats Gen. Jessup, Smith Briggs, and Flora Temple. The whole was under the command of General Graham. Before daylight, on the following morning, the boats had proceeded as far up the James River as Brandon, (which is near Harrison's Landing,) without the least opposition. From the Gen. Jessup a detachment of men were landed, under charge of Captain Lee, of the Harbor Police. Two other detachments were sent ashore, under Captain Harris, of one of the boats, and Captain Brown, of the Twenty-first connecticut regiment. Supported by the latter, the men of Captain Lee penetrated the interior of the country to the distance of three miles. Here was a signal-station of the rebels, which it was t
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 59
Doc. 57.-General Graham's expedition. General Butler's despatch. Fortress Monroe, Va., January 25, 1864. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: sir: Brigadier-General Graham, by my direction, went with three armed transports and a competent force to the Peninsula, made a landing on the James River, seven miles below Fort Powhatan, known as the Brandon Farms, and captured twenty-two of the enemy, seven of the signal corps, and brought away ninety-nine negroes. They also destroyed twenty-four thousand pounds of pork, and large quantities of oats and corn, and captured a sloop and schooner, and two hundred and forty boxes of tobacco, and five Jews, preparing to run the blockade, and returned without the loss of a man. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. A national account. Norfolk, Va., Tuesday, January 26, 1864. One of the most brilliant exploits that has been chronicled for some time past, was accomplished yesterday by some of our troops, whose brav
January 25th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 59
Doc. 57.-General Graham's expedition. General Butler's despatch. Fortress Monroe, Va., January 25, 1864. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: sir: Brigadier-General Graham, by my direction, went with three armed transports and a competent force to the Peninsula, made a landing on the James River, seven miles below Fort Powhatan, known as the Brandon Farms, and captured twenty-two of the enemy, seven of the signal corps, and brought away ninety-nine negroes. They also destroyed twenty-four thousand pounds of pork, and large quantities of oats and corn, and captured a sloop and schooner, and two hundred and forty boxes of tobacco, and five Jews, preparing to run the blockade, and returned without the loss of a man. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. A national account. Norfolk, Va., Tuesday, January 26, 1864. One of the most brilliant exploits that has been chronicled for some time past, was accomplished yesterday by some of our troops, whose brave
January 26th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 59
hatan, known as the Brandon Farms, and captured twenty-two of the enemy, seven of the signal corps, and brought away ninety-nine negroes. They also destroyed twenty-four thousand pounds of pork, and large quantities of oats and corn, and captured a sloop and schooner, and two hundred and forty boxes of tobacco, and five Jews, preparing to run the blockade, and returned without the loss of a man. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. A national account. Norfolk, Va., Tuesday, January 26, 1864. One of the most brilliant exploits that has been chronicled for some time past, was accomplished yesterday by some of our troops, whose bravery is only equalled by their patriotism. Late on Sunday afternoon a gunboat expedition started from this city, composed of the army gunboats Gen. Jessup, Smith Briggs, and Flora Temple. The whole was under the command of General Graham. Before daylight, on the following morning, the boats had proceeded as far up the James River as Bran
1 2