hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 702 0 Browse Search
Doc 416 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburgh (New York, United States) 318 4 Browse Search
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) 263 15 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 238 14 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 229 7 Browse Search
James G. Blunt 163 1 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 150 2 Browse Search
Robert L. McCook 149 1 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 149 7 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 240 total hits in 59 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Barnsville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ee's despatches and orders. Winchester, Va., October 14. Hon. G. W. Randolph: The cavalry expedition to Pennsylvania has returned safe. They passed through Mercersburgh, Chambersburgh, Emmitsburgh, Liberty, New-Market, Hyattstown, and Barnesville. The expedition crossed the Potomac above Williamsport, and recrossed at White's Ford, making the entire circuit, cutting the enemy's communication, destroying arms, etc., and obtaining many recruits. R. E. Lee, General. headquarters Departmore and Ohio Railroad, where we cut the telegraph-wires and obstructed the railroad. We reached at daylight Hyattstown, on McClellan's line of wagon communication with Washington, but we found only a few wagons to capture, and we pushed on to Barnsville, which we found just vacated by a company of the enemy's cavalry. We had here corroborated what we had heard before, that Stoneman had between four and five thousand troops about Poolesville and guarding the river fords. I started directly fo
Hyattstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ives General Lee's despatches and orders. Winchester, Va., October 14. Hon. G. W. Randolph: The cavalry expedition to Pennsylvania has returned safe. They passed through Mercersburgh, Chambersburgh, Emmitsburgh, Liberty, New-Market, Hyattstown, and Barnesville. The expedition crossed the Potomac above Williamsport, and recrossed at White's Ford, making the entire circuit, cutting the enemy's communication, destroying arms, etc., and obtaining many recruits. R. E. Lee, General. heaefore reaching Frederick I crossed the Monocacy, continued the march through the night, via Liberty, New-Market, Monrovia, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, where we cut the telegraph-wires and obstructed the railroad. We reached at daylight Hyattstown, on McClellan's line of wagon communication with Washington, but we found only a few wagons to capture, and we pushed on to Barnsville, which we found just vacated by a company of the enemy's cavalry. We had here corroborated what we had heard
New Market (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
s and Narratives General Lee's despatches and orders. Winchester, Va., October 14. Hon. G. W. Randolph: The cavalry expedition to Pennsylvania has returned safe. They passed through Mercersburgh, Chambersburgh, Emmitsburgh, Liberty, New-Market, Hyattstown, and Barnesville. The expedition crossed the Potomac above Williamsport, and recrossed at White's Ford, making the entire circuit, cutting the enemy's communication, destroying arms, etc., and obtaining many recruits. R. E. Lee, Gespatches from Col. Rush (Lancers) to the commander of the scout, which satisfied me that our whereabouts was still a problem to the enemy. Before reaching Frederick I crossed the Monocacy, continued the march through the night, via Liberty, New-Market, Monrovia, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, where we cut the telegraph-wires and obstructed the railroad. We reached at daylight Hyattstown, on McClellan's line of wagon communication with Washington, but we found only a few wagons to captu
Monrovia (Liberia) (search for this): chapter 2
ns of joy. A scouting-party of one hundred and fifty lancers had just passed toward Gettysburgh, and I regret exceedingly that my march did not admit of the delay necessary to catch them. Taking the road toward Frederick, we intercepted despatches from Col. Rush (Lancers) to the commander of the scout, which satisfied me that our whereabouts was still a problem to the enemy. Before reaching Frederick I crossed the Monocacy, continued the march through the night, via Liberty, New-Market, Monrovia, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, where we cut the telegraph-wires and obstructed the railroad. We reached at daylight Hyattstown, on McClellan's line of wagon communication with Washington, but we found only a few wagons to capture, and we pushed on to Barnsville, which we found just vacated by a company of the enemy's cavalry. We had here corroborated what we had heard before, that Stoneman had between four and five thousand troops about Poolesville and guarding the river fords. I s
Clearspring (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
, under command of Brig.-Gen. Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at twelve M., and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, where it camped for the night. At daylight next morning (October tenth) I crossed the Potomac at McCoy's (between Williamsport and Hancock) with some little opposition, capturing some two or three horses of the enemy's pickets. We were told here by citizens that a large force had been camped the night before at Clearspring, and were supposed to be en route to Cumberland. We proceeded northward until we had reached the turnpike leading from Hagerstown to Hancock, (known as the National Road.) Here a signal station on the mountain, and most of the party, with their flags and apparatus, were surprised and captured, and also eight or ten prisoners of war, from whom, as well as from citizens, I found that the large force alluded to had crossed but an hour ahead of me toward Cumberland, and consisted of six regi
Chambersburgh (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
orders. Winchester, Va., October 14. Hon. G. W. Randolph: The cavalry expedition to Pennsylvania has returned safe. They passed through Mercersburgh, Chambersburgh, Emmitsburgh, Liberty, New-Market, Hyattstown, and Barnesville. The expedition crossed the Potomac above Williamsport, and recrossed at White's Ford, making twould be able to resist it, you are desired to cross the Potomac above Williamsport, leave Hagerstown and Greencastle on your right, and proceed to the rear of Chambersburgh, and endeavor to destroy the railroad bridge over the branch of the Concoheague. Any other damage that you can inflict upon the enemy or his means of transpnformation that the notice the enemy had of my approach and the proximity of his forces, would enable him to prevent my capturing it. I therefore turned toward Chambersburgh. I did not reach this point till after dark, in a rain. I did not deem it safe to defer the attack till morning, nor was it proper to attack a place full of
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
to the enemy's country, on which this command is about to engage, brigade commanders will make arrangements for seizing horses, the property of citizens of the United States, and all other property subject to legal capture, provided that in no case will any species of property be taken except by authority given in person or in writa company in the absence of his superior officers. In all cases, a simple receipt will be given to the effect that the article is seized for the use of the confederate States, giving place, date, and name of owners, in order to enable the individual to have recourse upon his Government for damages. Individual plunder for privaand the inhabitants were generous in proffers of provisions on the march. We seized and brought over a large number of horses, the property of citizens of the United States. The valuable information obtained in this reconnoissance as to the distribution of the enemy's force was communicated orally to the Commanding General, and
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
The cavalry expedition to Pennsylvania has returned safe. They passed through Mercersburgh, Chambersburgh, Emmitsburgh, Liberty, New-Market, Hyattstown, and Barnesville. The expedition crossed the Potomac above Williamsport, and recrossed at White's Ford, making the entire circuit, cutting the enemy's communication, destroying arms, etc., and obtaining many recruits. R. E. Lee, General. headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, October 18, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector ween which and our solitary gun quite a spirited fire continued for some time. This answered, in connection with the high crest occupied by our piece, to screen entirely my real movement quickly to the left, making a bold and rapid strike for White's Ford, to make my way across before the enemy at Poolesville and Monocacy could be aware of my design. Although delayed somewhat by about two hundred infantry, strongly posted in the cliffs over the ford, yet they yielded to the moral effect of a f
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
nce may dictate. Col. Imboden has been desired to attract the attention of the enemy toward Cumberland, so that the river between that point and where you may recross may be less guarded. You willrge force had been camped the night before at Clearspring, and were supposed to be en route to Cumberland. We proceeded northward until we had reached the turnpike leading from Hagerstown to Hancock,m citizens, I found that the large force alluded to had crossed but an hour ahead of me toward Cumberland, and consisted of six regiments of Ohio troops and two batteries, under Gen. Cox, and were en route via Cumberland for the Kanawha. I sent back this intelligence at once to the Commanding General. Striking directly across the National road, I proceeded in the direction of Mercersburgh, Pennss the best route of return, particularly as Cox's command would have rendered the direction of Cumberland, full of mountain gorges, particularly hazardous. The route selected was through an open coun
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
rom bodies of the enemy that would be able to resist it, you are desired to cross the Potomac above Williamsport, leave Hagerstown and Greencastle on your right, and proceed to the rear of Chambersburgh, and endeavor to destroy the railroad bridge ov and were supposed to be en route to Cumberland. We proceeded northward until we had reached the turnpike leading from Hagerstown to Hancock, (known as the National Road.) Here a signal station on the mountain, and most of the party, with their flagn the direction of Mercersburgh, Pennsylvania, which point was reached about twelve M. I was extremely anxious to reach Hagerstown, where large supplies were stored; but was satisfied from reliable information that the notice the enemy had of my appry real route and object. I started directly towards Gettysburgh, but having passed the Blue Ridge, turned back towards Hagerstown for six or eight miles, and then crossed to Maryland by Emmettsburgh, when, as we passed, we were hailed by the inhabit
1 2 3 4 5 6