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Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
longing to it. The rebels made a desperate effort to recapture those batteries, but did not succeed. Our men, when subsequently compelled to fall back on the left, spiked all the guns which they could not get away. From statements made by prisoners and citizens, I think a just estimate of the rebel force will place the figures at thirty thousand. Pemberton was in the field in person. The confederate troops were from Georgia, South-Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Missouri. Bowen's command, which we whipped at Port Gibson, was there. A large portion of it was captured, among them fifty men and a captain from Gates's regiment of dismounted cavalry. The rebels concentrated three fourths of their men upon three divisions of our army, those of Logan, Hovey, and Quinby, so that they had really about seven thousand men more than we had in the engagement. The result of to-day's fight was a complete victory for General Grant's forces, and the total rout and dem
Port Gibson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
to recapture those batteries, but did not succeed. Our men, when subsequently compelled to fall back on the left, spiked all the guns which they could not get away. From statements made by prisoners and citizens, I think a just estimate of the rebel force will place the figures at thirty thousand. Pemberton was in the field in person. The confederate troops were from Georgia, South-Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Missouri. Bowen's command, which we whipped at Port Gibson, was there. A large portion of it was captured, among them fifty men and a captain from Gates's regiment of dismounted cavalry. The rebels concentrated three fourths of their men upon three divisions of our army, those of Logan, Hovey, and Quinby, so that they had really about seven thousand men more than we had in the engagement. The result of to-day's fight was a complete victory for General Grant's forces, and the total rout and demoralization of the rebel army. Our loss will rea
Bakers Creek (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
umphal success. We have defeated the rebels in four successive battles on fields of their own choosing, and before to-morrow night we will probably increase the number to five. At Thompson's Hills, at Raymond, and at Jackson, they met us, and essayed to stop our progress, but signally failed. To-day they again gave us battle, and victory. I am at a loss to know by what name to designate the battle-field of to-day. The engagement may be known, officially, hereafter as the battle of Baker's Creek, as that stream runs within a very short distance of our first line of battle ; or it may take its name from Edwards's Station, on the Vicksburgh and Jackson Railroad, within a few miles of which the scene of conflict was. The casualty list of to-day's battle shows an engagement much more severe than any one of the previous three fought since our debarkation at Bruinsburgh. As yet, I have no data from which to form a just estimate of the number of killed and wounded on our side. Fro
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
in one gallant dash took it, and every man belonging to it. The rebels made a desperate effort to recapture those batteries, but did not succeed. Our men, when subsequently compelled to fall back on the left, spiked all the guns which they could not get away. From statements made by prisoners and citizens, I think a just estimate of the rebel force will place the figures at thirty thousand. Pemberton was in the field in person. The confederate troops were from Georgia, South-Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Missouri. Bowen's command, which we whipped at Port Gibson, was there. A large portion of it was captured, among them fifty men and a captain from Gates's regiment of dismounted cavalry. The rebels concentrated three fourths of their men upon three divisions of our army, those of Logan, Hovey, and Quinby, so that they had really about seven thousand men more than we had in the engagement. The result of to-day's fight was a complete victory for Gen
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
The men, without exception, did gallant service, and stood up to the galling fire of an over-whelming force for three hours and twenty minutes, like veterans, and Indiana and the country generally may well feel proud of the gallant men engaged in the greatest battle of the war. My loss in killed and wounded was two hundred and sattle-field in the evening they held a religious meeting, at which the exercises were very impressive. As I write they are filling the woods with Old hundred. Indiana was more largely represented in the fight to-day than any other State. The troops that were exposed to the heaviest fire were from the Hoosier State. Among them course, but to fall back, which they did in excellent order. After retreating a short distance they rallied and held the enemy in check till reinforcements came up, when they in turn drove the enemy along their whole line. Indiana has just cause to feel proud of the deeds of her sons in the hard-fought battle of the sixteenth.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
capture, and in one gallant dash took it, and every man belonging to it. The rebels made a desperate effort to recapture those batteries, but did not succeed. Our men, when subsequently compelled to fall back on the left, spiked all the guns which they could not get away. From statements made by prisoners and citizens, I think a just estimate of the rebel force will place the figures at thirty thousand. Pemberton was in the field in person. The confederate troops were from Georgia, South-Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Missouri. Bowen's command, which we whipped at Port Gibson, was there. A large portion of it was captured, among them fifty men and a captain from Gates's regiment of dismounted cavalry. The rebels concentrated three fourths of their men upon three divisions of our army, those of Logan, Hovey, and Quinby, so that they had really about seven thousand men more than we had in the engagement. The result of to-day's fight was a complete vict
Big Black (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
it was thought they could gain nothing by fighting for the bridge, which is the only object of the battle commenced to-day. I say commenced to-day, because I believe it will be continued to-morrow, and may last still longer. General Hovey's division of McClernand's corps held the advance on the night of the fifteenth. The rebels were known to be awaiting our approach, in the vicinity of Edwards's Station. This morning, at about seven o'clock, General Hovey commenced moving toward Big Black River. A company of cavalry was thrown out as an advance-guard. They had proceeded but a short distance, when they were met by the enemy's cavalry, supposed to be a part of Wirt Adams's regiment. After a little skirmishing, the rebels fell back. Our cavalry did not follow them up. At about nine o'clock, the ground chosen by the rebels was reached. General Hovey's division was halted and formed into line of battle. Skirmishers were thrown out and advanced toward heavy timber, where the r
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
gallant dash took it, and every man belonging to it. The rebels made a desperate effort to recapture those batteries, but did not succeed. Our men, when subsequently compelled to fall back on the left, spiked all the guns which they could not get away. From statements made by prisoners and citizens, I think a just estimate of the rebel force will place the figures at thirty thousand. Pemberton was in the field in person. The confederate troops were from Georgia, South-Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Missouri. Bowen's command, which we whipped at Port Gibson, was there. A large portion of it was captured, among them fifty men and a captain from Gates's regiment of dismounted cavalry. The rebels concentrated three fourths of their men upon three divisions of our army, those of Logan, Hovey, and Quinby, so that they had really about seven thousand men more than we had in the engagement. The result of to-day's fight was a complete victory for General Gran
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 202
f a hill, at the foot of which his command was resting, and, while looking at the flag, was shot in the side. He staggered down the hill and expired in about half an hour. The result of Logan's fighting was the capture of two batteries of artillery, and the utter rout of the enemy's right. The three brigades of the Third division, commanded by Generals John E. Smith, M. D. Leggett, and John D. Stevenson, nobly sustained the reputation they have long held as true soldiers and brave men. The Ohio brigade was skilfully handled by General Leggett, who is one of the most efficient brigadiers in the Western army. De Golyer's Eighth Michigan battery did splendid execution, driving back the rebel column several times. Captain De Golyer is spoken of in the highest terms by his superior officers. While Logan and Hovey were busy on the right and centre, Osterhaus and Carr were doing their work finely on the left. They took a full share in the engagement. Osterhaus opened the fight ear
Donelson (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
that he had to keep his lines contracted and receive the full fire of the enemy, who was pouring in reinforcements and concentrating them upon his exposed ranks from a heavy timber cover. Hovey had not yet been reinforced, though he had seen the impossibility of holding his position, and had sent for support. The firing became terrible. Such an awful rattle of musketry as was kept up between Hovey's division and the almost concealed foe, was not heard upon the bloody fields of Shiloh or Donelson. Hovey held his ground with heroic tenacity for an hour and a half. Had he given way at first, the rebels would have turned our left, and the consequences could not have been other than disastrous. After a long and desperate struggle with an enemy of more than twice his numerical strength, and at every disadvantage of position, he was compelled to give way. He was forced back half a mile — retreating in excellent order, expecting every moment to meet reinforcements, and quickly regain
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