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Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
fty miles in width, from which the enemy's forces had recently been expelled, were rapidly decreasing in strength from the large numbers of soldiers sent home on account of real or pretended disability. On the other hand, the enemy's armies were greatly increased by an arbitrary and rigidly enforced conscription. With their superiority in numbers and discipline they boldly determined to reoccupy Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, and Kentucky, and, if possible, to invade the States of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, while our attention was distracted by the invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, and an extended Indian insurrection on the Western frontiers. This plan had very many chances of success; but the timely order of the President of August fourth, calling for additional forces, and the patriotic response of the people of the North-West, thwarted the enemy's well-formed calculations. Gen. Bragg suddenly transferred a large part of his army from Tupelo, Mississippi, through the
Holly Springs (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
M., when the enemy retreated south, crossing the Hatchie at Corum's Mills, about six miles further up the river. Our loss was fifty killed, four hundred and ninety-three wounded, and seventeen missing. Gen. Hurlbut did not attempt any pursuit, and Gen. Rosecrans did not leave Corinth till the morning of the fifth. The enemy therefore effected his escape, but was followed for a distance of about sixty miles without being overtaken. Gen. Grant afterward led his forces south as far as Holly Springs, and drove the enemy across the Tallahatchie. This operation was attended with several brisk skirmishes, in all of which our troops were victorious. These operations have restored peace in Western Tennessee. The official reports of the operations of General Grant's army are submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 6. The unfortunate withdrawal to Missouri, by General Curtis, of a large part of the army in Arkansas, prevented the execution of the military operations which had been ord
Richmond, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ack upon Nashville, without giving the enemy battle — then followed, or rather moved parallel with Bragg, who, after capturing our garrison at Munfordsville, turned off from the main road to Louisville, along which Gen. Buell passed — the latter reaching Louisville without any engagement. Another column of the enemy had moved from East-Tennessee, after blockading Cumberland Gap, upon Lexington, and threatened Cincinnati. A small force of our raw troops, which had been pushed forward to Richmond, Ky., under Major-General Nelson, were met by the enemy and completely routed. In the mean time, every effort had been made to collect new troops at Cincinnati and Louisville, and to fortify these places against a coup de main. To give confidence to the new levies, a portion of Gen. Grant's army was withdrawn from Mississippi and sent to Kentucky and Cincinnati. No attack was attempted by the enemy. Major-Gen. Buell left Louisville on the first of October, with an army of about one hu
Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
twenty-fourth of October, Gen. Butler sent a force, under Brig.-Gen. Weitzel, to operate on the west bank of the Mississippi, in the La Fourche district. He engaged a considerable body of the enemy on the twenty-fifth, about nine miles from Donaldsonville, and defeated them, with the loss of their commander, a large number killed and wounded, and two hundred and sixty-eight prisoners. Our loss was eighteen killed and sixty-eight wounded. This victory opened the whole of that part of the country. General Butler's reports of the military operations in his department are submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 7. (See Donaldsonville.) In the department of the South the only military operations which have been undertaken were the reconnoissances of the Pocotaligo and Coosahatchie Rivers. These expeditions under Brig.-Gen. Brannan and Col. Barton, encountered a considerable force of the enemy on the twenty-second of October, and engagements ensued, in which we lost thirty-two killed
Farmington (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
killed, one thousand eight hundred and twelve wounded, and two hundred and thirty-two prisoners and missing. This great disparity of numbers in killed and wounded resulted in part from the fact that a portion of our men fought behind the intrenched batteries. Major-General Grant had ordered a brigade of four regiments, under Brig.-General McPherson, from Jackson to Corinth. Finding the railroad interrupted at Bethel, the latter turned to the left and reached Corinth on the fourth by the Farmington road, thus marching nearly around the enemy, and forming a timely junction with General Rosecrans. Other forces from Jackson and Bolivar, under Brig.-Gen. Hurlbut, were directed to march on Corinth by way of Middleton and Pocahontas, to cut off the enemy's retreat in that direction. They encountered the enemy on the Hatchie River, on the morning of the fifth, and as Brig.-Gen. Hurlbut was making dispositions for an attack, Major-Gen. Ord arrived upon the field and assumed command, but
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ty thousand, but immediately on my return to Washington he telegraphed that he would require thirty-t was impossible to send him without leaving Washington and Baltimore almost defenceless. The only ould unite with that of Gen. Pope, and cover Washington at the same time that it operated against the to drive back Gen. Pope, and attack either Washington or Baltimore. The information was so directn Pope's rear, and cut off his supplies from Washington. Anticipating this danger, I had telegrapwith elsewhere — here is the true defence of Washington. It is here on the bank of the James River eral. official copy. Headquarters, army, Washington, D. C., November 23, 1862. Exhibit no. 2. Washington, August 6, 1862. Major-General George B. McClellan, Commanding, etc., Berkeley, Va.: m the South. Gen. Pope's army, now covering Washington, is only forty thousand. Your effective for between Richmond and Washington, and covers Washington from any attack by the enemy. The politic[11 more...]
Newmarket, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
un, and to be protected by a regiment of infantry, and a section of artillery. For some unexplained reasons Porter did not comply with this order, and his corps was not in the battles of the twenty-eighth and twenty-ninth. Heintzelman's corps pressed forward to Manassas on the morning of the twenty-eighth, and forced Jackson to retreat across Bull Run by the Centreville turnpike. McDowell had succeeded in checking Lee at Thoroughfare Gap, but the latter took the road from Hopeville to Newmarket and hastened to the relief of Jackson, who was already in rapid retreat. A portion of McDowell's corps encountered the retreating column on the afternoon of the twenty-eighth, near Warrenton turnpike, and a severe but successful engagement ensued. Jackson was again attacked on the twenty-ninth, near the old battle-ground of July, 1861. Knowing that Longstreet was not distant, he made a most desperate stand. The fight continued nearly all day, and was terminated only by darkness. We ha
Meadow Station (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
, induced the enemy to renew operations in Northern Mississippi and Western Tennessee. A force of some five thousand or six thousand men was sent to attack Bolivar and Jackson, Tennessee, and by destroying the railroad to cut off all connection between Memphis and Corinth. The head of the enemy's column was met about four miles south of Bolivar on the thirtieth of August, and a brisk skirmish ensued. On the thirty-first, a portion of the enemy's forces was engaged and repulsed near Meadow Station. On the first of September the fight was renewed at Britton's Lane, on the Denmark road, and continued till night, when the enemy retreated south, across the Hatchie, leaving one hundred and seventy-nine dead and wounded on the field. Our loss was five killed, seventy-eight wounded, and ninety-two prisoners and missing. In the early part of October, General Price advanced with a large force and took possession of Iuka, a small town on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, twenty-one
Washington county (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
received and are receiving large reenforcements from the South. Gen. Pope's army, now covering Washington, is only forty thousand. Your effective force is only about ninety thousand. You are thirty miles from Richmond, and General Pope eighty or ninety. With the enemy directly between you, ready to fall with his superior numbers upon one or the other, as he may elect, neither can reenforce the other in case of such an attack. If Gen. Pope's army be diminished to reenforce you, Washington, Maryland, and Pennsylvania would be left uncovered and exposed. If your forces be reduced to strengthen Pope, you would be too weak to even hold the position you occupy, should the enemy turn round and attack you in full force. In other words, the old army of the Potomac is split into two parts, with the entire force of the enemy directly between them. They cannot be united by land without exposing both to destruction, and yet they must be united. To send Pope's forces by water to the Peni
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
d and perhaps destroyed. Seeing that an attack upon Washington would now be futile, Lee pushed his main army across the Potomac for a raid into Maryland and Pennsylvania. Gen. McClellan was directed to pursue him with all troops which were not required for the defence of Washington. Several corps were immediately thrown out innessee, and Kentucky, and, if possible, to invade the States of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, while our attention was distracted by the invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, and an extended Indian insurrection on the Western frontiers. This plan had very many chances of success; but the timely order of the President of August four, as he may elect, neither can reenforce the other in case of such an attack. If Gen. Pope's army be diminished to reenforce you, Washington, Maryland, and Pennsylvania would be left uncovered and exposed. If your forces be reduced to strengthen Pope, you would be too weak to even hold the position you occupy, should the enem
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