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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 61
since. I also have the gratification to name the members of my staff who served with me on this occasion, viz.: Lieutenant L. D. Sandidge, corps artillery Confederate States army, A. A. A. and Inspector-General; Captain George Whitfield, Chief Quartermaster; Major E. S. Ruggles, acting Ordnance Officer, and Acting Chief Commissand Major-General Butler, respectfully demand, in advance of the approaching fleet, the surrender of Vicksburg and its defences to the lawful authorities of the United States, under which private property and personal right will be respected. Very respectfully, yours, J. Phillips Lee, U. S. N., commanding Advance Naval Division. I only saw them there for the first time. At this time a second Federal battery entered the field, and was opportunely met by a section of Captain Semmes' Confederate States battery. It affords me pleasure to bear testimony to the cool and effective response made by Captain Semmes and Lieutenant West, whom the Fourth and Thirti
Benton's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
red and fifty yards distant, our commander, after calling for three cheers for the Confederacy, ordered us to charge. Alarmed at our shouts and dash, the enemy broke, taking off their battery, but leaving heaps of slain and wounded. It was here that Captain Chinn fell, from a wound in the leg, while gallantly responding, at the head of his company, to Colonel Allen's orders. Resuming our course, we soon found ourselves upon the edge of an old field, on the opposite side of which is the Benton Ferry road, and the enclosure of the race track. Square in our front was posted, along the roadside, a number of the enemy's skirmishers or sharpshooters, and to their left a battery was planted at the mouth of a street in front of the outskirts of the corporation of Baton Rouge. A regiment (the Sixth Michigan) supported the battery, and its men were placed behind the fences and houses in the neighborhood of Hockney's. Colonel Allen, taking the colors of his command in his hand, rapidly drew
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
rgy which successfully executed that resolution, was local in its character, nor was it a spirit bounded by State lines, or circumscribed by State pride. It was a broad, catholic spirit, wide as our country, and unlimited as the independence we struggle to establish. The power which baffled the enemy resided in the breasts of the soldiers of seven States, marshaled behind the ramparts of Vicksburg. Mississippians were there, but there too, also, were the men of Kentucky, of Tennessee, of Alabama, of Arkansas, of Louisiana, and of Missouri, as ready to defend the emporium of Mississippi as to strike down the foe at their own hearthstones. I incorporate with my report a schedule of the forces under my command at Vicksburg, as a proper contribution to the archives of the Confederacy. General Helm.--Fourth Kentucky volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Hynes; Fifth Kentucky volunteers, Colonel Hunt; Thirty-first Alabama volunteers, Colonel Edwards; Fourth Alabama battalion, Lieutenant-Col
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
as the independence we struggle to establish. The power which baffled the enemy resided in the breasts of the soldiers of seven States, marshaled behind the ramparts of Vicksburg. Mississippians were there, but there too, also, were the men of Kentucky, of Tennessee, of Alabama, of Arkansas, of Louisiana, and of Missouri, as ready to defend the emporium of Mississippi as to strike down the foe at their own hearthstones. I incorporate with my report a schedule of the forces under my command attherly, on temporary service. A number of gentlemen from Louisiana and elsewhere, rendered efficient service as volunteers, among whom were Lieutenant-Colonel Pinckney, Mr. Addison, and Captain Bird, of. Louisiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Brewer, of Kentucky, and Mr. William B. Hamilton, of Mississippi. The thanks of the army are due to the Hon. Thomas J. Davidson, for his attention to the hospitals, and to all the inhabitants of that part of Louisiana for their devotion to our sick and wounded. C
Greenwell Springs (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
lion, commanded by Colonel Smith, of the Twentieth Tennessee, together with the Hudson battery, and one piece of Cobb's battery, advanced to the right of the Greenwell Springs road. On the right, as on the left, the enemy was constantly pressed back, until after several hours of fighting he was driven to his last encampment in a lton, on our extreme right. The head of the division column, preceded by a company of mounted rangers and advanced guard, reached Ward's Creek bridge, on the Greenwell Springs and Baton Rouge road, about three o'clock A. M., where a temporary halt was called preparatory to the formation of the division line of battle. During this vice was promptly and gallantly performed. He drove in the enemy's pickets, followed them up, and opened fire on a regimental encampment to the right of the Greenwell Springs road, driving the enemy from it. He was here met by two regiments of the enemy, but succeeded in holding them at bay till he was fired upon by our own artill
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
and Captain W. P. Wallace and Lieutenant Charles Temple, Aids, and Acting Adjutant R. B. L. Soney, of the Third Kentucky, be specially expressed in this report. To the deportment of the Thirty-fifth Alabama regiment he desires attention to be called. This regiment, although for the first time under fire, on the fifth instant, proved itself a worthy comrade for the Third, Sixth, and Seventh Kentucky regiments, who in this action sustained the enviable reputation won by them on the field of Shiloh. Colonel Robertson would call special attention to the gallant conduct of Colonel E. Crossland and Lieutenant-Colonel E. Goodwin, who, the first with his regimental colors in hand, and the second with his hat on his sword, led the brigade in the final charge. To the reports of regimental commanders you are referred for notices of gallant conduct in other members of the command. The medical staff deserve the highest praise for their prompt and unceasing attention to the wounded. By orde
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
, after arriving within a short distance of Baton Rouge, in ample time for joint action at the appotelegram every hour of her progress towards Baton Rouge, and counting on her co-operation, attacked-General Breckinridge, of his operations at Baton Rouge and Port Hudson, herewith forwarded. It ging reached the Comite river, ten miles from Baton Rouge, and learning by an express messenger that o'clock P. M., and reached the vicinity of Baton Rouge a little before daybreak on the morning of h of August. The line was advanced towards Baton Rouge steadily. In obedience to an order of my bnd discharged their duties in the action at Baton Rouge in a manner creditable alike to themselves,ach of the enemy, then known to have passed Baton Rouge with a formidable fleet, having in view to uring the battle of the fifth of August, at Baton Rouge, I beg to refer you to the report circumsta a mile to the rear of a central portion of Baton Rouge. As soon as the line was formed, it was pu[32 more...]
East Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
ental colors in hand, and the second with his hat on his sword, led the brigade in the final charge. To the reports of regimental commanders you are referred for notices of gallant conduct in other members of the command. The medical staff deserve the highest praise for their prompt and unceasing attention to the wounded. By order of G. C. Hubbard, Lieutenant, and A. A. G. J. W. Robertson, Colonel, commanding First Brigade, Second Division. Report of Colonel H. W. Allen. East Baton Rouge, August 18, 1862. Captain Buckner, Assistant Adjutant-General: Sir: On the morning of the fifth instant, in pursuance to orders of Brigadier-General Ruggles, I formed the Second brigade, Second division, in line of battle; the left of the brigade resting upon Bernard's fence, in the rear of Magruder's Institute, and the right resting upon the First brigade. On the right was placed Colonel Breaux, of the Thirteenth Louisiana; on the left, Lieutenant-Colonel Hunter, of the Fourth Loui
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
Doc. 61.-Vicksburg and Baton Rouge. Report of Major-General Van Dorn. headquarters District of the Mississippi, Jackson, Miss., September 9, 1862. General: I have the honor to submit, for the information of the War Department, the following report of the defence of Vicksburg, and of operations in this district, up to the present time: Pursuant to orders I assumed command of this district, and of the defences of Vicksburg, on the twenty-seventh day of June, 1862. Prior to my arissippi, which Baton Rouge is not, and batteries there will command the river more completely than at Vicksburg. On the nineteenth day of August, in obedience to orders from the headquarters of the department, I moved from Port Hudson for Jackson, Mississippi, with a portion of the force, leaving Brigadier-General Ruggles in command with------troops. In concluding this report, I have to express my obligations for the prompt and cordial support which I received at all times from the Major-Gener
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
ult. The enemy held Baton Rouge, the capital of Louisiana, forty miles below the mouth of Red River, with a arance from the Mississippi between the capital of Louisiana and Vicksburg. The results sought by the movemententucky, of Tennessee, of Alabama, of Arkansas, of Louisiana, and of Missouri, as ready to defend the emporium ing cheers inspired all our little command. The Louisiana troops charged a battery and captured two pieces. fully justified the confidence of his troops. The Louisiana battery, Captain Semmes,was admirably handled thro on temporary service. A number of gentlemen from Louisiana and elsewhere, rendered efficient service as volunlonel Pinckney, Mr. Addison, and Captain Bird, of. Louisiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Brewer, of Kentucky, and Mr. Wpitals, and to all the inhabitants of that part of Louisiana for their devotion to our sick and wounded. Colonre manned by three companies of the First regiment Louisiana artillery, two companies of the Twenty-second, two
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