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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

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Pulaski, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
we have a long delay to deplore, the second course still remains open to us; and I strongly advise the close blockade of Pulaski, and its bombardment as soon as the 13-inch mortars and heavy guns reach you. I am confident you can thus reduce it. Wit body of your force disposable for other operations. I do not consider the possession of Savannah worth a siege after Pulaski is in our hands. But the possession of Pulaski is of the first importance. The expedition to Fernandina is well, and IPulaski is of the first importance. The expedition to Fernandina is well, and I shall be glad to learn that it is ours. But, after all, the greatest moral effect would be produced by the reduction of Charleston and its defences. There the rebellion had its birth; there the unnatural hatred of our government is most intenseavannah, unless it can be carried with certainty by a coup de main. Please concentrate your attention and forces upon Pulaski and Fernandina. St. Augustine might as well be taken by way of an interlude while awaiting the preparations for Charles
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Any success gained at that time in front of Washington could not have been followed up, and a victo the line of operations leading by land from Washington to Richmond, but to conduct a sufficient foreadily pushing forward the fortifications of Washington and the instruction and organization of the o Gen. Halleck.headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., Nov. 11, 1861. general: In assigning. To Gen. Buell.headquarters of the Army, Washington, Nov. 7, 1861. general: In giving you ins. To Gen. Buell.headquarters of the Army, Washington, Nov. 12, 1861. general: Upon assuming coGen. T. W. Sherman.headquarters of the Army, Washington, Feb. 14, 1862. general: Your despatches them to the adjutant-general of the army in Washington, I think at the same time with my report. M an office--first in New York, afterwards in Washington — entirely distinct from that of the adjutanent inclined to think that a close search in Washington will be productive of much better results th[9 more...]
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
, Stevens, and some officers of experience to Kentucky, stating that the importance of his departmenell found no difficulty in holding his own in Kentucky, and drove the enemy out of Kentucky and out Kentucky and out of the capital of Tennessee as soon as he had received and organized the reinforcements, which were conduct of operations there. That portion of Kentucky west of the Cumberland river is by its posititment of Missouri. Your operations there, in Kentucky, will be confined to that portion of the Stately necessary that we shall hold all the State of Kentucky; not only that, but that the majority of that the conduct of our political affairs in Kentucky is more important than that of our military othe general government. The inhabitants of Kentucky may rely upon it that their domestic institute main avenues by which the rebels may invade Kentucky. Our conversations on the subject of militarings I did when in command was sending him to Kentucky. About the time he went there, and for som[1 more...]
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
pared to make that movement. In the meantime it is my advice and wish that no attempt be made upon Savannah, unless it can be carried with certainty by a coup de main. Please concentrate your attention and forces upon Pulaski and Fernandina. St. Augustine might as well be taken by way of an interlude while awaiting the preparations for Charleston. Success attends us everywhere at present. Very truly yours, Geo. B. McClellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Gen. T. W. Sherman, Commanding at Port Royal, etc. To Gen. Butler.headquarters of the Army, Washington, Feb. 23, 1862. general: You are assigned to the command of the land forces destined to co-operate with the navy in the attacks upon New Orleans. You will use every means to keep your destination a profound secret, even from your staff officers, with the exception of your chief of staff and Lieut. Weitzell, of the engineers. The force at your disposal will consist of the first thirteen regiments named in your memorandum hand
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
to follow the line of operations leading by land from Washington to Richmond, but to conduct a sufficient force by mater to Urbana, and thence by a rapid march to West Point, hoping thus to cut off the garrison of Yorktown and all the Confederates in the Peninsula; then, using the James river as a line of supply, to move the entire Army of the Potomac across that river to the rear of Richmond. In pursuance of this plan I did not propose disturbing the Confederate forces at Manassas and Centreville, but, while steadily pushing forward the fortifications of Washington and the instruction and organization of the Army of the Potomac, I desired to hold them there to the last moment, and especially until the Urbana movement was well in process of execution. There was no possible military reason for disturbing them, and it best answered my purposes to keep them where they were I was not apprehensive of any attack by them after the first few weeks. Their presence served to keep my men
Berwick Bay (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
with the mass of your troops, also the eastern bank of the river above the city. It may be necessary to place some troops in the city to preserve order ; but if there appears to be sufficient Union sentiment to control the city, it may be best for purposes of discipline to keep your men out of the city. After obtaining possession of New Orleans it will be necessary to reduce all the works guarding its approaches from the east, and particularly to gain the Manchac pass. Baton Rouge, Berwick bay, and Fort Livingston will next claim your attention. A feint on Galveston may facilitate the objects we have in view. I need not call your attention to the necessity of gaining possession of all the rolling stock you can on the different railways, and of obtaining control of the roads themselves. The occupation of Baton Rouge by a combined naval and land force should be accomplished as soon as possible after you have gained New Orleans. Then endeavor to open your communication with
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
jects we have in view. I need not call your attention to the necessity of gaining possession of all the rolling stock you can on the different railways, and of obtaining control of the roads themselves. The occupation of Baton Rouge by a combined naval and land force should be accomplished as soon as possible after you have gained New Orleans. Then endeavor to open your communication with the northern column by the Mississippi, always bearing in mind the necessity of occupying Jackson, Mississippi as soon as you can safely do so, either after or before you have effected the junction. Allow nothing to divert you from obtaining full possession of all the approaches to New Orleans. When that object is accomplished to its fullest extent it will be necessary to make a combined attack on Mobile, in order to gain possession of the harbor and works, as well as to control the railway terminus at the city. In regard to this I will send more detailed instructions as the operations of the n
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
avalry, 580 artillery; total, 15,255 men. The commanding general of the Department of Key West is authorized to loan you, temporarily, two regiments, Fort Pickens can probably give you another, which will bring your force to nearly 18,000. The object of your expedition is one of vital importance — the capture of New Orleans. The route selected is up the Mississippi river, and the first obstacle to be encountered (perhaps the only one) is in the resistance offered by Forts St. Philip and Jackson. It is expected that the navy can reduce these works; in that case you will, after their capture, leave a sufficient garrison in them to render them perfectly secure; and it is recommended that, on the upward passage, a fern heavy guns and some troops be left at the pilot station (at the forks of the river) to cover a retreat in the event of a disaster. These troops and guns will, of course, be removed as soon as the forts are captured. Should the navy fail to reduce the works you will
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ng by land from Washington to Richmond, but to conduct a sufficient force by mater to Urbana, and thence by a rapid march to West Point, hoping thus to cut off the garrison of Yorktown and all the Confederates in the Peninsula; then, using the James river as a line of supply, to move the entire Army of the Potomac across that river to the rear of Richmond. In pursuance of this plan I did not propose disturbing the Confederate forces at Manassas and Centreville, but, while steadily pushing foxpedition were to control the navigation of the sounds on the North Carolina coast, thus cutting off the supplies of Norfolk by water, and at the same time covering the left flank of the main army when operating against Richmond by the line of James river, the reduction of New Berne, Beaufort, and Wilmington, which would give us the double advantage of preventing blockade-running at those points and of enabling us to threaten or attack the railways near the coast, upon which Richmond largely de
Chesapeake Bay (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
with waterproof cartridges; the other companies to have such arms as I may hereafter designate; to be uniformed and equipped as the Rhode Island regiments are. Launches and floating batteries with timber parapets of sufficient capacity to land or bring into action the entire force. The entire management and organization of the force to be under my control, and to form an integral part of the Army of the Potomac. The immediate object of this force is for operations in the inlets of Chesapeake bay and the Potomac. By enabling me thus to land troops at points where they are needed, this force can also be used in conjunction with a naval force operating against points on the sea-coast. This coast division to be commanded by a general officer of my selection; the regiments to be organized as other land forces; the disbursements for vessels, etc., to be made by the proper department of the army upon the requisitions of the general commanding the division, with my approval. I thin
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