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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
edford261.44 105 ShipHenry TukeT. Magoun'sT. MagounD. P. ParkerBoston371 106 BrigTarrierT. Magoun'sT. MagounThomas H. PerkinsBoston157 107 ShipSapphireS. Lapham's------RogersStephen GloverBoston362 108 BrigJohn GilpinS. Lapham's------RogersStephen GloverBoston270 109 ShipEleanorSprague & James'sSprague & JamesR. D. ShepherdBoston301 110 BrigVirginiaSprague & James'sSprague & JamesParker & StevensBoston166 111 BrigGriffinSprague & James'sSprague & JamesJoshua BlakeBoston177 112 BrigS. Carolina Repaired, at an expense equal to the value of one hundred tons.Sprague & James'sSprague & JamesR. D. ShepherdBoston100 113 BrigAmericaGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerParker & StevensBoston170 114 BrigCongressGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerWilliam GoddardBoston270 1151825ShipMagnoliaT. Magoun'sT. MagounGeo. G. Jones & T. MagounBoston & Medford395 116 BrigAgnesT. Magoun'sT. MagounJohn A. BaconBoston206 117 ShipTrescottT. Magoun'sT. MagounNathaniel GoddardBoston335 118 BrigElizaS. La
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
e whole of Medford seems to have a deep stratum of pure clay under it. The facility of procuring pine, chestnut, and hemlock-wood by the Middlesex Canal made this branch of business profitable; but when steam navigation could bring bricks from Maine, where wood was half the price it bore here, the Medford trade was fatally curtailed. The bricks were carted to Boston at great cost, which gave the yards in Charlestown an advantage over ours. If they were taken in lighters, by the river, this lightering was very hard; for, at times, it became necessary for men to walk on the banks, and thus tow the sloop by means of long ropes. This toil was often undertaken in the night, and during stormy weather. Wood and bark were freighted from Maine, and rockweed from Boston Harbor. A business that was suspended during two or three months of each year, on account of ice, was not attractive to those who wished steady employment, and was not likely therefore to secure the best laborers. Mi
Denmark, Madison co., Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
SonMedford492 203 ShipRubiconSprague & James'sSprague & JamesWilliam EagerBoston489 204 ShipElizabeth BruceSprague & James'sSprague & JamesWilliam EagerBoston586 205 SloopNoddleGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerA. C. LombardBoston75 206 Sch.FawnGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerR. B. ForbesBoston35 207 BarkGulnareJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonJ. P. WheelerBoston287 208 ShipWilliam GoddardJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonWm. Goddard and othersBoston556 209 ShipMercuryJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonB. BangsBoston368 210 ShipDenmarkT. Magoun'sCurtis & Co.George PrattBoston550 2111836ShipDeucalionT. Magoun'sT. MagounT. Magoun & SonMedford509 212 ShipColchisS. Lapham'sS. LaphamS. Lapham 449 213 ShipBombaySprague & James'sSprague & JamesR. HooperBoston482 214 BrigTheodoreSprague & James'sSprague & JamesAugustus NealSalem156 215 ShipAdrianSprague & James'sSprague & JamesWilliam EagerBoston588 216 ShipCarolinaGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerA. C. LombardBoston396 217 ShipClaudiusT. Magoun'sP. & J. O. CurtisJohn B
Fort Vancouver (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
urtisFrench & CoffinNantucket367 350 Sch.Charles AlstonSamuel Teel'sPeter LewisJohn AdamsProvincetown98 351 Sch.TonquinT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellMinot & HooperBoston524 352 BarkDouglassT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellBates & Co.Boston491 353 ShipSantiagoT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellW. H. GoddardBoston433 354 BarkWm. H. ShailerT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellSeecomb, Bartlett, & Co.Boston243 355 BarkPalmettoT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellLombard & HallBoston280 356 ShipVancouverT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellD. C. BaconBoston548 357 ShipThomas W. SearsT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellJoshua SearsBoston536 358 BarkMariaT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellJ. T. Bacon & SonBoston333 359 BrigPrairieT. Magoun'sH. EwellT. Magoun & SonMedford189 3601846ShipDolphinS. Lapham'sS. LaphamMackey & CoolidgeMedford500 361 ShipGeorge H. HopleyJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonBelm and othersCharleston, S. C.590 362 BarkClementP. Curtis'sP. CurtisSeth RyderChatham203 363 BarkMaryP
Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
g business. The result was much as our citizens had foretold: bricks soon began to be carried by oxen in carts; thus saving both the loading and unloading in the sloop, where many were necessarily broken. The labor of lightering was very hard; for, at times, it became necessary for men to walk on the banks, and thus tow the sloop by means of long ropes. This toil was often undertaken in the night, and during stormy weather. Wood and bark were freighted from Maine, and rockweed from Boston Harbor. A business that was suspended during two or three months of each year, on account of ice, was not attractive to those who wished steady employment, and was not likely therefore to secure the best laborers. Mills. The building of a mill required more iron and stone work than our fathers in Medford were at first prepared to carry through: they therefore adopted the Indian's mill; which was a rock hollowed out in the shape of a half-globe, and a stone, pestle. The mortar held half
Berlin (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
oun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellGeorge PrattBoston650 269 ShipOswegoT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellJ. Macy & SonNew York663 270 ShipTaglioniT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellWilliam H. BoardmanBoston800 2711841ShipSoldanSprague & James'sSprague & JamesGeorge PrattBoston661 272 Sch.ArielSprague & James'sSprague & JamesR. B. ForbesBoston92 273 Stmr.East BostonSprague & James'sSprague & JamesAugustus NealSalem269 274 ShipMiddlesexSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorJ. H. PearsonBoston500 275 ShipBerlinS. Lapham'sS. LaphamWm. H. & J. E. BoardmanBoston600 276 ShipProbusJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonD. P. ParkerBoston656 277 ShipCairoJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonB. C. WhiteBoston256 278 ShipCoquimboP. Curtis'sP. CurtisB. BangsBoston684 279 BarkJ. W. PaigeJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisC. TaylorChatham200 280 ShipNavigatorJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisCrosby & SwiftNantucket346 281 ShipUnited StatesJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisBarrett & UptonNantucket357 282 ShipGov. DavisT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellE
Winter Brook (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
obtained the local name. After these gentlemen came Seth Tufts, who, with his son Seth, carried on the business till recently. These yards were situated near Middlesex Canal and the river, about south-south-east from Rock Hill. The next in order of age were the yards opened in 1810 by Nathan Adams, Esq. They were situated each side of the old county road, leading from Medford over Winter Hill, and were about half a mile south of the Great Bridge, in the small valley on the borders of Winter Brook. From the first kiln, Captain Adams built the house now standing on the right side of the road, twenty rods north of the kiln, as an advertisement; and the bricks show the goodness of the clay and the skill of the workmen. These yards were next occupied by Mr. Babbitt, but have been discontinued for ten or fifteen years. We presume that bricks have been made in many places now unknown to us; for nearly the whole of Medford seems to have a deep stratum of pure clay under it. The fa
Mount Etna (Nevada, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ons for his predilection. From Salem, he went to Mr. Barker's yard, in Charlestown (the present Navy Yard), where he worked and studied two years, and assisted in modelling. There he made the model of the first vessel he built, which was the Mount Aetna, of Medford. In 1802, he began to look about him for a place in which he might safely begin, on his own account, the business which was the darling choice of his life. An accident, so called in the world's language, led him, one pleasant daystic benefactions and these foreign bounties, we are moved to a devout acknowledgment of the wisdom and care of God. Register of vessels built in Medford. No.Date.Descrip.Name.Yard.Builders.Owners.Their Residence.Ton'age. 11803BrigMount Aetna First vessel built in this town after the Revolution. There were some built before the Revolution, as one named Mayflower, for that which brought over the Plymouth Puritans, by Mr. Rhodes, of Boston, on land now owned by Mr. Hastings.T. Ma
Cowes (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11
lf the price it bore here, the Medford trade was fatally curtailed. The bricks were carted to Boston at great cost, which gave the yards in Charlestown an advantage over ours. If they were taken in lighters, by the river, this did not much lessen the expenses of transportation, but increased the risks of fracture. The high price of labor, of wood, and of cartage, rendered competition unwise; and the manufacture of bricks has ceased. Ship-building. Governor Winthrop sailed from Cowes, in England, on Thursday, April 8, 1630. On Saturday, June 12, he reached Boston Bay; and, on the 17th of that month, he makes the following record: Went up Mistick River about six miles. To this heroic and Christian adventurer belongs the honor of building the first vessel whose keel was laid in this part of the Western World; and that vessel was built on the bank of Mystic River, and probably not far from the governor's house at Ten Hills. There is a tradition that it was built on the north
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
lT. Magoun & SonMedford189 3601846ShipDolphinS. Lapham'sS. LaphamMackey & CoolidgeMedford500 361 ShipGeorge H. HopleyJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonBelm and othersCharleston, S. C.590 362 BarkClementP. Curtis'sP. CurtisSeth RyderChatham203 363 BarkMaryP. Curtis'sP. CurtisZimsy Whelden 205 364 ShipBostonP. Curtis'sP. CurtisWilliam Perkins & Co.Boston663 1/2 365 ShipAbby PrattP. Curtis'sP. CurtisGeorge PrattBoston687 366 BarkCeresJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisJ. A. McGaw & LincolnBoston387 367 ShipAlabamaJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisJ. H. ShawNantucket347 368 ShipMontereyJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisWilliam LincolnBoston400 369 BarkEdwinJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisWales & Co.Boston350 370 BarkHollanderT. Magoun'sH. EwellBates & Co.Boston304 371 BrigAlertT. Magoun'sH. EwellW. F. Wild & Co.Boston172 372 Sch.EugeneT. Magoun'sH. EwellParker, Cook, and othersProvincetown100 373 BrigPaulinaT. Magoun'sH. EwellE. Flinn and othersChatham190 374 BrigLaurettaT. Magoun'sH. EwellR. A. Cook and oth
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