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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller).

Found 17,402 total hits in 6,834 results.

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r-time portraits of typical soldiers who turned to public life and education. Notable as lawyers, writers and statesmen are General Carl Schurz who became Minister to Spain, Secretary of the Interior, and editor of the New York Evening Post; and General Lewis Wallace, Governor of New Mexico, Minister to Turkey, and author of Ben Hur and other historical novels. Brevet Brigadier-General Stewart L. Woodford, Lieut.-Gov. Of New York, 1866-68; President electoral College, 1872; M. C., 1873-75; U. S. Dist. Atty., 1877-83; U. S. Minister to Spain, 1879-98. Brevet Brigadier-General James Grant Wilson, author of Addresses on Lincoln, Grant, Hull, Farragut, etc.; President, New York Genealogical and biographical Society and of American Ethnological Society. Brevet Major-General William B. Hazen, chief signal officer, raised 41st Ohio volunteers; marched with Sherman to the sea; commanded 15th Army Corps; U. S Military Attache to France. Major-General Carl Schurz. Major-General
Simmons, Drillard, Ducat, Barnett, Goddard, Rosecrans, Garfield, Porter, Bond, Thompson, Sheridan. War-time portraits of six soldiers whose military records assisted them to the Presidential Chair. Brig.-Gen. Andrew Johnson President, 1865-69. General Ulysses S. Grant, President, 1869-77. Bvt. Maj.-Gen. Rutherford B. Hayes President, 1877-81. Maj.-Gen. James A. Garfield President, March to September, 1881. Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Benjamin Harrison President, 1889-93. Brevet Major Wil1869-77. Bvt. Maj.-Gen. Rutherford B. Hayes President, 1877-81. Maj.-Gen. James A. Garfield President, March to September, 1881. Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Benjamin Harrison President, 1889-93. Brevet Major William McKinley, President, 1897-1901. many cases between fighters and non-combatants. This is true, even when the latter are represented in full army overcoats, with swords and the like, as was customary to some extent with postmasters, quartermasters, commissariat and hospital attendants. The features are distinctive of the men who have stood up under fire, and undergone the even severer ordeal of submission to a will working for the common good, involving the sacrifice of personal independ
litary records assisted them to the Presidential Chair. Brig.-Gen. Andrew Johnson President, 1865-69. General Ulysses S. Grant, President, 1869-77. Bvt. Maj.-Gen. Rutherford B. Hayes Presidenet Major George Haven Putnam, 176th New York, prisoner at Libby and Danville in the winter of 1864-65. Chief of Scouts Henry Watterson, C. S. A., aide-de-camp to General Forrest, chief of Scouts undolumes consist of portraits alone, to represent adequately the soldiers whose fame has come since 1865. Merely to suggest the function of the Civil War as a school of citizenship, portraits are pref G. A. R. 1910-11 (Grand Army of the Republic). Bvt. Brig.-Gen. T. F. Rodenbough, U. S. A., in 1865; wounded at Trevilian and Winchester; later Secretary, U. S. Military service institution (Cavalrwould have fallen far short of fulfilment. But those same youths who survived to the summer of 1865—how differently they stood!—erect, with arms well hung, with quiet dignity, with the self-assuran
arnett, Goddard, Rosecrans, Garfield, Porter, Bond, Thompson, Sheridan. War-time portraits of six soldiers whose military records assisted them to the Presidential Chair. Brig.-Gen. Andrew Johnson President, 1865-69. General Ulysses S. Grant, President, 1869-77. Bvt. Maj.-Gen. Rutherford B. Hayes President, 1877-81. Maj.-Gen. James A. Garfield President, March to September, 1881. Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Benjamin Harrison President, 1889-93. Brevet Major William McKinley, President, 1897-1901. many cases between fighters and non-combatants. This is true, even when the latter are represented in full army overcoats, with swords and the like, as was customary to some extent with postmasters, quartermasters, commissariat and hospital attendants. The features are distinctive of the men who have stood up under fire, and undergone the even severer ordeal of submission to a will working for the common good, involving the sacrifice of personal independence. Their dignity and qui
the author's personal acquaintance with the Union War-time photographs of Confederate soldiers contributors to the photographic history Col. Hilary A. Herbert; later member of Congress and Secretary of the Navy (The Meaning of losses in battle). Lieut.-Col. J. W. Mallet; later professor of Chemistry, University of Virginia (Confederate ordnance). Private John A. Wyeth in 1861, at 16; later organizer of the New York Polyclinic (Confederate raids). Lieut. R. H. McKim in 1862; later Rector Church of the Epiphany, Washington, and Military and religious writer (The Confederate Army). Captain F. M. Colston, artillery officer with Alexander (Memoirs of Gettysburg and many rare photographs). Allen C. Redwood, of the 55th Virginia, with Stonewall Jackson; later Artist and author (Confederate Reminiscences; Jackson). Brig.-Gen.M. J.Wright; later U. S. War Dept. Agent (Records of the War and statistics). Col. D. G. McIntosh; later Attorney-at-law (Artillery of t
nd author of Ben Hur and other historical novels. Brevet Brigadier-General Stewart L. Woodford, Lieut.-Gov. Of New York, 1866-68; President electoral College, 1872; M. C., 1873-75; U. S. Dist. Atty., 1877-83; U. S. Minister to Spain, 1879-98. Brevet Brigadier-General James Grant Wilson, author of Addresses on Lincoln, Granzed Street Cleaning system of New York City; died in Havana, Cuba, fighting Yellow fever. Brevet Brigadier-General Francis W. Palfrey, register in Bankruptcy in 1872; author of Antietam and Fredericksburg in 1882; author of many Scholarly and important papers. Lieutenant E. Benjamin Andrews: wounded at Petersburg, 1864; profesity, 1882-88; President thereof, 1889-98. Brevet Brigadier-General Francis A. Walker, superintendent Ninth and Tenth Censuses; commissioner of Indian affairs in 1872; President, Mass. Institute of Technology, 1881. well as the general, the captain as well as the colonel, and the private as well as the captain. On the whole,
rd Bates Attorney-General. Other members were: War, Simon Cameron (1861); Treasury, W. P. Fessenden, July 1, 1864, and Hugh McCulloch, Marchie superintended Military railways and Government Telegraph lines in 1861. Lieut.-General Nathan B. Forrest, C. S. A., entered as private; Lieut.-Col., 1861, Maj.-Gen., 1864. Brevet Brig.-General Thomas T. Eckert, superintendent of Military Telegraph; Asst. Sec. Of War, 1864-66. of eighteen or nineteen, who rushed to the defense of their flag in 1861, lacked, as most boys do, some notable phenomenon, blow, catastrophein resolution and resourcefulness, most of the men who were young in 1861 could possibly have become village constables—no more. The leadinrsity of Virginia (Confederate ordnance). Private John A. Wyeth in 1861, at 16; later organizer of the New York Polyclinic (Confederate raid life, health, and activity of pen throughout the half-century since 1861; and who have contributed largely the materials of the Photographic
ble to the right, rising head and shoulders above the distinguished bystanders, grasping his manuscript in both hands, stands Abraham Lincoln. Of all the occasions on which he talked to his countrymen, this was most significant. The time and place marked the final and lasting approval of his political and military policies. Despite the bitter opposition of a majority of the Northern political and social leaders, the people of the Northern States had renominated Lincoln in June, 1864. In November, encouraged by the victories of Farragut at Mobile, Sherman in Georgia, and Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, they had reflected him President of the United States by an electoral vote of 212 to 21. Since the election, continued Northern victories had made certain the speedy termination of the war. Not long since, his opponents had been so numerous and so powerful that they fully expected to prevent his renomination. Lincoln himself, shortly after his renomination, had come to believe t
William H. Seward (search for this): chapter 1
een soldiers hardly a year—the boy on the right, so slight and young, might almost be masquerading in an officer's uniform. Of such were the soldiers who early in the war fought the South in the flush of her strength and enthusiasm Members of President Lincoln's official family Edwin M. Stanton Secretary of War. Montgomery Blair Postmaster-General. Gideon Welles Secretary of the Navy. Salmon P. Chase Secretary of the Treasury. Hannibal Hamlin vice-president. William H. Seward Secretary of State. Caleb B. Smith Secretary of the Interior. Edward Bates Attorney-General. Other members were: War, Simon Cameron (1861); Treasury, W. P. Fessenden, July 1, 1864, and Hugh McCulloch, March 4, 1865; Interior, John P. Usher, January 8, 1863; Attorney-General, James Speed, December 2, 1864; Postmaster-General, William Dennison, September 24, 1864. Men who helped president Davis guide the ship of state: vice-president Stephens and members of the Confederate
Montgomery Blair (search for this): chapter 1
veterans—men of McClernand's corps in their quarters at Memphis, Tennessee, after the costly attempt on Vicksburg by way of Chickasaw Bluffs. Yet they have been soldiers hardly a year—the boy on the right, so slight and young, might almost be masquerading in an officer's uniform. Of such were the soldiers who early in the war fought the South in the flush of her strength and enthusiasm Members of President Lincoln's official family Edwin M. Stanton Secretary of War. Montgomery Blair Postmaster-General. Gideon Welles Secretary of the Navy. Salmon P. Chase Secretary of the Treasury. Hannibal Hamlin vice-president. William H. Seward Secretary of State. Caleb B. Smith Secretary of the Interior. Edward Bates Attorney-General. Other members were: War, Simon Cameron (1861); Treasury, W. P. Fessenden, July 1, 1864, and Hugh McCulloch, March 4, 1865; Interior, John P. Usher, January 8, 1863; Attorney-General, James Speed, December 2, 1864; Postmaster-Genera
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