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Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
nton, Army of the Potomac, p. 498. Early on the morning of the 13th, Warren, who executed his critical task with marked address, pushed forward Crawford's division on the New Market road, and compelling the few Confederate squadrons of observation to retire across White Oak Swamp, threatened direct advance on Richmond, while the activity of his powerful horse completely shrouded for the time the movement in his rear. Lee did not attack, for Early had been detached for the defence of Lynchburg, and the main body of his cavalry being absent under Hampton, he was compelled, like the Great Frederick, when Traun's Pandours enveloped Silesia in midnight, to read his position as if by flashes of lightning. On the next day, however, a small body of horse, under W. H. F. Lee, boldly charging the enemy, drove them hotly past Malvern Hill, and on the same evening Lee received accurate information as to the whereabouts of his adversary. Lee's dispatch, 9 P. M., June 14th, 1864. But not
Hatcher's Run (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
ander concentrated on his left the greater portion of three army corps, Swinton, Army of the Potomac, p. 540. and on October 27th, was fought The battle of Hatcher's Run, an action so confused by reason of the heavily wooded character of the country, that it would be impossible for you to follow the details without the aid och as will never be credited by those who shall read the story hereafter in peace and plenty. To guard the long line of entrenchments from the Chickahominy to Hatcher's Run, there was now left but a gaunt remnant of that valiant host which had cheered Lee in the Wilderness as it passed to victory — which had hurled back nearly thrmorable detail. On the evening of April 1st, the battle of Five Forks was fought, and lost to the Confederates, and at dawn next morning, from Appomattox to Hatcher's Run, the Federal assaults began. Lee was forced back from the whole line covering the Boydton Plank Road, and Gibbon's division of Ord's corps boldly essayed to b
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
l railroad and effect a junction with Hunter, on Sunday night, June 12th, The Army of the Potomac was put in motion for the James. Warren, with the Fifth corps and Wilson's division of cavalry, seizing the crossing at Long Bridge, made his dispositions to screen the movement. Hancock's corps, marching past the Fifth, was directed upon Willcox's landing; Wright's and Burnside's corps upon Douthat's, while Smith, with four divisions of the Tenth and Eighteenth corps, moved rapidly to White House and embarked for Bermuda Hundred. Swinton, Army of the Potomac, p. 498. Early on the morning of the 13th, Warren, who executed his critical task with marked address, pushed forward Crawford's division on the New Market road, and compelling the few Confederate squadrons of observation to retire across White Oak Swamp, threatened direct advance on Richmond, while the activity of his powerful horse completely shrouded for the time the movement in his rear. Lee did not attack, for Ear
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
h the historian speaks, had come to brighten the horizon, and, continuing, quickened into vigorous action the vast resources of the North. Grant, reinforced by over thirty thousand men at Spotsylvania, As the Secretary of War denies access to the archives at Washington, it is impossible to state the precise figures. Mr. Stanton in his report says: Meanwhile, in order to repair the losses of the Army of the Potomac, the chief part of the force designed to guard the Middle Department (Baltimore) and the Department of Washington (in all 47,751 men), was called forward to the front. was heavily reinforced again; and putting aside with great firmness the well known wishes of the Federal Executive, prepared to change his strategy for the fifth time, and Assail Richmond from the South. It was a determination based upon the soundest military principles, for from that direction could an assailant hope to bring to bear with greatest assurance of success that cardinal maxim of mil
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
at 5,240; Cannon (Grant's Campaign Against Richmond, p. 245) at 5,640; General Meade (Report of August 16th, 1864) puts loss at 4,400 in A. P. and 18th corps, but does not give loss in Turner's division, 10th corps. Yet many brave men perished on the Confederate side. Elliott's brigade lost severely in killed and prisoners. The Virginia brigade, too, paid the price which glory ever exacts. The Sixth carried in 98 men and lost 88, one company--the dandies, of course--Old Company F of Norfolk, losing every man killed or wounded. Company K, of Sixth Virginia, carried in sixteen men; eight were killed outright and seven wounded. The small number of men carried into the fight by the Sixth is explained by the fact that quite half the regiment was on picket on the old front (on the right), and could not be withdrawn. The 41st Virginia lost one-fourth its number; the 61st within a fraction of half its number. The loss in the 16th was nearly as great as in the 6th proportionally,
Long Bridge (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
nt pressed its execution. From the 4th to the 11th of June, by a gradual withdrawal of his right flank, he had placed his army within easy marches of the lower crossings of the Chickahominy, and Sheridan, meanwhile, having been dispatched to destroy the Virginia Central railroad and effect a junction with Hunter, on Sunday night, June 12th, The Army of the Potomac was put in motion for the James. Warren, with the Fifth corps and Wilson's division of cavalry, seizing the crossing at Long Bridge, made his dispositions to screen the movement. Hancock's corps, marching past the Fifth, was directed upon Willcox's landing; Wright's and Burnside's corps upon Douthat's, while Smith, with four divisions of the Tenth and Eighteenth corps, moved rapidly to White House and embarked for Bermuda Hundred. Swinton, Army of the Potomac, p. 498. Early on the morning of the 13th, Warren, who executed his critical task with marked address, pushed forward Crawford's division on the New Market
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
his ponton-train at a convenient point, ready to move at a moment's warning, for Meade, having assured himself that the Confederates had no second line on Cemetery Hill, as he had formerly supposed and as Duane had positively reported, Ib., pp. 43, 44. was now sanguine of success, and made these preparations to meet the contingency of the meagre Confederate force retiring beyond the Appomattox and burning the bridges; in which event, he proposed to push immediately across that river and Swift Creek and open up communication with Butler at Bermuda Hundred before Lee could send any reinforcements from his five divisions north of the James. Meade's testimony--Ib., p. 75. To cover the assault, the Chief of Artillery was to concentrate a heavy fire on the Confederate batteries commanding the salient and its approaches, and to this end, eighty-one heavy guns and mortars and over eighty light guns were placed in battery on that immediate front. Statement of General Hunt, Chief of
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
for a considerable time in Hill's corps.--remember, men and women of Richmond, that they more than once offered to share that little with the starving poor of your beautiful city: thinly clad, their bodies indeed shivered under the freezing blasts of heaven, but their dauntless spirits cowered not under the fiery blasts of war. But there was to be added a pang deeper than the pang of hunger, sharper than the rigor of the elements or hurt of shot and steel. For now from the cotton-lands of Georgia and the rice-fields of Carolina, came borne on every blast the despairing cry which wives and little ones raised to wintry skies lit by baleful glare of burning homes, and the men of the Old North State bethought them of the happy homesteads which lay straight in the path of the ruthless conqueror, who was waging war with an audacious cruelty capable of dishonoring a whole nation. A subtle enemy, till then well-nigh unknown, attacked in rear this army which still haughtily held its front,
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
. 487; Draper, vol. III, p. 387. Confidence of the Army of Northern Virginia. Such was the retrospect of this thirty days campaign to Lee, as he sat in his simple tent pitched upon the very ground, whence, but two years before, with positions reversed, he had driven McClellan in rout and disaster to the James; and though Lee the man was modest, he was but mortal, and Lee the soldier could but be conscious of his own genius, and having proved the matchless temper of the blade, which Providence, or Destiny, or call it what you will, had placed within his hands, we may be sure that his heart was stirred with high hopes of his country's deliverance, and that through these hopes his pliant genius was inspired to discern in each new difficulty but fresh device. And his veterans of confirmed hardihood, watching the gracious serenity of that noble face, conscious of the same warlike virtues whch made him dear to them, caught up and reflected this confidence, remembering that he had de
Trevilian (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.34
is shameful pillage on the part of the men to be wondered at, for in the head-quarter wagon of the commanding general was found much plunder — among other articles of stolen silver a communion-service inscribed Saint John's Church, Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg. A list of the stolen silver may be found in the Richmond Examiner, July 5th, 1864. In the same paper (June 27th) may be seen an official list, sent by General Lomax, of the silver found in Custer's head-quarter wagon captured at Trevilian's. The silver was sent to W. H. McFarland, Esq., of Richmond, to be identified and reclaimed by its owners. Fitz. Lee, in hot pursuit, captured within a few miles two more light guns, and ordered the Federal artillerymen to turn them upon their flying comrades. Whether through pride in their well-known proficiency in this arm of the service, or because they were conscious of the exclusive, if not gratifying attention, of sundry lean-faced Confederates of determined aspect, I do not
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