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West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.108
ed on the approach of winter, and his mind had become affected, though so slightly, that no apprehensions were entertained of such result. He was a graduate of West Point, of the class of 1832, and served for two years afterward in the Second United States Artillery. After his death his brigade was commanded by Colonel R. E. Witett As a Captain in the Ninth United States Infantry, General Pickett bore a prominent part in the San Juan difficulty with England in 1859. He graduated at West Point in 1846, and served in the Eighth United States Infantry in Mexico, receiving two brevets for gallantry. of Virginia was assigned to it. Hunton's regiment did ned to the command of a Georgia brigade, in General G. W. Smith's division, and General R. H. Anderson, of South Carolina, General R. H. Anderson graduated at West Point, in 1838, and served in the First United States Dragoons until the secession of South Carolina. He was brevetted for gallantry in Mexico, and was a Captain whe
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11.108
assigned to it. Hunton's regiment did not rejoin the brigade from Leesburg until March. Early in February General D. R. Jones was assigned to the command of a Georgia brigade, in General G. W. Smith's division, and General R. H. Anderson, of South Carolina, General R. H. Anderson graduated at West Point, in 1838, and served in the First United States Dragoons until the secession of South Carolina. He was brevetted for gallantry in Mexico, and was a Captain when he resigned. was transferred South Carolina. He was brevetted for gallantry in Mexico, and was a Captain when he resigned. was transferred from Pensacola, where he had previously served, to command the South Carolina brigade. General Ewell had been assigned to command General Longstreet's old brigade in December, but being shortly afterward made Major-General; the command reverted to Col. Kemper, who retained it until March, when General A. P. Hill was assigned to it. On the 9th of March, 1862, General Johnston ordered the evacuation of the lines of Centreville and Manassas, and put his army in motion for the line of the Rapi
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 11.108
d in instituting his desired campaign, an advance upon Richmond by way of the Peninsula, although under certain restrictions by Mr. Lincoln, which almost appear ridiculous. His unwilling consent was granted, provided-- First. That long-coveted Manassas, at length happily possessed, should be forever secured to the peaceable possession of the stars and stripes. Lincoln's War Order No. 3, March 8th, 1863. Second. That no more than fifty thousand men should be allowed to leave Washington city without some steps being taken to put an end to the impudent and provoking blockade of the Potomac. McClellan's Report, page 60. Third. That enough troops should be left in the fortifications around Washington to secure it against all contingencies. A comparison of the forces which were retained for the defences of the two capitals develops a wonderful contrast. The force kept at Richmond, though often charged with the safekeeping of large numbers of prisoners, varied from 3
Robert Preston (search for this): chapter 11.108
General J. E. B. Stuart, and was assigned a division composed of his own old brigade, now commanded by the senior Colonel, J. L. Kemper; the Virginia brigade commanded by General P. St. George Cocke, and the South Carolina brigade of General D. R. Jones. General Cocke's brigade was composed of the Eighth Virginia infantry, Colonel Eppa Hunton; Eighteenth Virginia infantry, Colonel R. E. Withers; Nineteenth Virginia infantry, Colonel J. B. Strange; Twenty-Eighth Virginia infantry, Colonel Robert Preston. Latham's Virginia Battery.--General D. R. Jones's brigade was composed of the Fourth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel J. B Sloan; Fifth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel M. Jenkins; Sixth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel C. S. Winder; Ninth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel Blanding; Stribling's Virginia Battery. The Eighth Virginia, Colonel Hunton, was at this time on detached service at Leesburg with General Evans's brigade, where it bore a conspicuous part in the the affair a
t, in 1838, and served in the First United States Dragoons until the secession of South Carolina. He was brevetted for gallantry in Mexico, and was a Captain when he resigned. was transferred from Pensacola, where he had previously served, to command the South Carolina brigade. General Ewell had been assigned to command General Longstreet's old brigade in December, but being shortly afterward made Major-General; the command reverted to Col. Kemper, who retained it until March, when General A. P. Hill was assigned to it. On the 9th of March, 1862, General Johnston ordered the evacuation of the lines of Centreville and Manassas, and put his army in motion for the line of the Rapidan. General Longstreet's division, with Stuart's cavalry covered the movement, which, however, was unmolested, the enemy only discovering it after it was under way. General McClellan was at that period collecting the necessary transportation for his movement to the Peninsula, but as this was not yet read
General P. St. George Cocke, and the South Carolina brigade of General D. R. Jones. General Cocke's brigade was composed of the Eighth Virginia infantry, Colonel Eppa Hunton; Eighteenth Virginia infantry, Colonel R. E. Withers; Nineteenth Virginia infantry, Colonel J. B. Strange; Twenty-Eighth Virginia infantry, Colonel Robert Ps; Sixth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel C. S. Winder; Ninth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel Blanding; Stribling's Virginia Battery. The Eighth Virginia, Colonel Hunton, was at this time on detached service at Leesburg with General Evans's brigade, where it bore a conspicuous part in the the affair at Ball's Bluff, on the 21se graduated at West Point in 1846, and served in the Eighth United States Infantry in Mexico, receiving two brevets for gallantry. of Virginia was assigned to it. Hunton's regiment did not rejoin the brigade from Leesburg until March. Early in February General D. R. Jones was assigned to the command of a Georgia brigade, in Gener
George Cocke, and the South Carolina brigade of General D. R. Jones. General Cocke's brigade was composed of the Eighth Virginia infantry, Colonel Eppa Hunton; Eighteenth Virginia infantry, Colonel R. E. Withers; Nineteenth Virginia infantry, Colonel J. B. Strange; Twenty-Eighth Virginia infantry, Colonel Robert Preston. Latham's Virginia Battery.--General D. R. Jones's brigade was composed of the Fourth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel J. B Sloan; Fifth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel M. Jenkins; Sixth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel C. S. Winder; Ninth South Carolina Infantry, Colonel Blanding; Stribling's Virginia Battery. The Eighth Virginia, Colonel Hunton, was at this time on detached service at Leesburg with General Evans's brigade, where it bore a conspicuous part in the the affair at Ball's Bluff, on the 21st of October. The remaining brigades of the army were about the same time thrown into three other divisions of three brigades each and commanded by Major-Gen
do not justify this assertion. On the contrary, they show that the discipline of the Army of Northern Virginia was never equal to that of the Army of the Potomac, though in fire and elan it was superior. I could always rely on my army, said General Lee at the time he surrendered its remnant at Appomattox Courthouse, I could always rely on my army for fighting, but its discipline was poor. At the time of the Maryland invasion Lee lost above twenty-five thousand men by straggling, and he exclLee lost above twenty-five thousand men by straggling, and he exclaimed, with tears, My army is ruined by straggling. Nothing could better illustrate the high state of discipline of the Army of the Potomac than its conduct in such retreats as that on the Peninsula, and in Pope's campaign, and in such incessant fighting as the Rapidan campaign of 1864. This comparison is not suggested as any reflection upon the fame of the Federal army, for such reflections upon its adversary are unbecoming to either, and the list of casualties of the Federals (not their l
Persifer Smith (search for this): chapter 11.108
visions, stores and baggage had to be burned at Manassas at the last moment, although two days more time had been allowed for their removal than the superintendent of the road had requested. The total value of these stores was, however, not great, and when all things are considered, the movement was as eminently successful as it was judicious. The Washington artillery battalion This celebrated battalion was originally founded in 1838. In the Mexican war it was Company A, of Colonel Persifer Smith's regiment, of which Colonel J. B. Walton, who commanded the battalion from 1861 to 1864, was Lieutenant-Colonel. It was composed of five batteries, of which the first four served in Virginia, and the fifth with the Army of Tennessee. Its battery commanders in March, 1862, were: Captains C. W. Squires, T. L. Rosser, (afterwards Major-General of calvary), M. B. Miller, and B. F. Eshleman. Its material was superb; the cannooneers being almost exclusively young men of the best famili
February General D. R. Jones was assigned to the command of a Georgia brigade, in General G. W. Smith's division, and General R. H. Anderson, of South Carolina, General R. H. Anderson graduated at West Point, in 1838, and served in the First United States Dragoons until the secession of South Carolina. He was brevetted for gallantry in Mexico, and was a Captain when he resigned. was transferred from Pensacola, where he had previously served, to command the South Carolina brigade. General Ewell had been assigned to command General Longstreet's old brigade in December, but being shortly afterward made Major-General; the command reverted to Col. Kemper, who retained it until March, when General A. P. Hill was assigned to it. On the 9th of March, 1862, General Johnston ordered the evacuation of the lines of Centreville and Manassas, and put his army in motion for the line of the Rapidan. General Longstreet's division, with Stuart's cavalry covered the movement, which, however,
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