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Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 9: Kenesaw ungenerous treatment of Thomas inaccurate statements. There waate on the flank, and force the evacuation of Kenesaw without a battle, exactly as was done a few ded on a line parallel with the enemy south of Kenesaw. I think that Allatoona and the line of the movement, and promptly abandoned Marietta and Kenesaw. I expected as much, for by the earliest dawc close by our camp. I directed the glass on Kenesaw, and saw some of our pickets crawling up the the bloody cost of assaulting the position at Kenesaw, General Sherman concluded to flank it by exte promptly, and as a matter of course, let go Kenesaw and Marietta without a fight. In answer to the enemy to withdraw part of his force from Kenesaw to strengthen the flank in front of Schofieldre army from the extreme left, at the base of Kenesaw to the right, below Olley's Creek, and stretc Chattahoochee. Of course he chose to let go Kenesaw and Marietta, and fall back on an intrenched [8 more...]
Marietta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
oad at a point (Fulton) about ten miles below Marietta, or to the Chattahoochee River itself, a movedetected the movement, and promptly abandoned Marietta and Kenesaw. I expected as much, for by the e. Of course, he chose to let go Kenesaw and Marietta, and fall back on an intrenched camp, prepareand as a matter of course, let go Kenesaw and Marietta without a fight. In answer to the contradin hand on roads converging to my then object, Marietta. And the following: Sherman to Grat us to make a lodgment on his railroad below Marietta, or even to cross the Chattahoochee. Of course he chose to let go Kenesaw and Marietta, and fall back on an intrenched camp prepared by his ordeon the morning of the 3d of July, I rode into Marietta, just quitted by the rebel rear guard, and was from the direction of Powder Springs toward Marietta, producing delay and confusion. By night Thoenched at Smyrna camp ground, six miles below Marietta, and there, on the next day, we celebrated ou[2 more...]
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
attacking intrenched lines, I at once thought of moving the whole army to the railroad at a point (Fulton) about ten miles below Marietta, or to the Chattahoochee River itself, a movement similar to the one afterward so successfully practiced at Atlanta. All the orders were issued to bring forward supplies enough to fill our wagons, intending to strip the railroad back to Allatoona, and leave that place as our depot, to be covered as well as possible by Garrard's cavalry. General Thomas, as uThomas is well intrenched on a line parallel with the enemy south of Kenesaw. I think that Allatoona and the line of the Etowah are strong enough for me to venture on this move. The movement is substantially down the Sandtown road straight for Atlanta. McPherson drew out his lines during the night of July 2d, leaving Garrard's cavalry, dismounted, occupying his trenches, and moved to the rear of the Army of the Cumberland, stretching down the Nickajack; but Johnston detected the movement,
road, Thomas' assaulting column reached the parapet, where Brigadier-General Harker was shot down mortally wounded, and Brigadier-General Dani. Thomas to Sherman, 10:45 A. M., June 27: Yours received. General Harker's brigade advanced to within twenty paces of the enemy's breast-works, and was repulsed with canister at that range, General Harker losing an arm. General Wagner's brigade of Newton's division, supporting General Harker, was so severely handled that it is compelled to reorganize. Colonel Mitchell's brigade of Davis' division captured one line oo thousand officers and men, among them two brigade commanders, General Harker, commanding a brigade in Newton's division, and Colonel Dan. Mcwounded, besides some six or eight field officers killed. Both General Harker and Colonel McCook were wounded on the enemy's breastworks, and beyond measure the loss of two such young and dashing officers; as Harker and Dan. McCook. McPherson lost two or three of his young and dash
Daniel McCook (search for this): chapter 9
ral Harker was shot down mortally wounded, and Brigadier-General Daniel McCook (my old law partner) was desperately wounded, red one line of rebel breastworks, which they still hold. McCook's brigade was also very severely handled, nearly every colonel being killed or wounded. Colonel McCook wounded. It is compelled to fall back and reorganize. The troops are all too ers has been very heavy. Nearly all the field officers of McCook's brigade, with McCook have been killed or wounded. From McCook have been killed or wounded. From what the officers tell me I do not think we can carry the works by assault at this point to-day, but they can be approached rker, commanding a brigade in Newton's division, and Colonel Dan. McCook, commanding a brigade in Jeff. Davis' division, both eight field officers killed. Both General Harker and Colonel McCook were wounded on the enemy's breastworks, and all say tss of two such young and dashing officers; as Harker and Dan. McCook. McPherson lost two or three of his young and dashing o
ard supplies enough to fill our wagons, intending to strip the railroad back to Allatoona, and leave that place as our depot, to be covered as well as possible by Garrard's cavalry. General Thomas, as usual, shook his head, deeming it risky to leave the railroad; but something had to be done, and I had resolved on this move, as reure on this move. The movement is substantially down the Sandtown road straight for Atlanta. McPherson drew out his lines during the night of July 2d, leaving Garrard's cavalry, dismounted, occupying his trenches, and moved to the rear of the Army of the Cumberland, stretching down the Nickajack; but Johnston detected the movem pursue vigorously on the morning of the 3d of July, I rode into Marietta, just quitted by the rebel rear guard, and was terribly angry at the cautious pursuit by Garrard's cavalry, and even by the head of our infantry columns. But Johnston had in advance cleared and multiplied his roads; whereas ours had to cross at right angles
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 9
rely handled that it is compelled to reorganize. Colonel Mitchell's brigade of Davis' division captured one line of rebel breastworks, which they still hold. McCoo1:40 P. M., 27th June: Your dispatches 11:45 A. M. and 1:30 P. M. received. Davis' two brigades are now within sixty yards of the enemy's intrenchments. Davis rDavis reports that he does not think he can carry the works by assault on account of the steepness of the hill, but he can hold his position, put in one or two batteries tohigh and nine feet thick. In front of Howard they have a very strong abattis. Davis' loss in officers has been very heavy. Nearly all the field officers of McCookue gained to-day to be secured, and prepare batteries in the manner proposed by Davis. I doubt if we can resort to regular approaches. Thomas to Sherman, June 27igade in Newton's division, and Colonel Dan. McCook, commanding a brigade in Jeff. Davis' division, both reported to be mortally wounded, besides some six or eight f
homas to Sherman, 10:45 A. M., June 27: Yours received. General Harker's brigade advanced to within twenty paces of the enemy's breast-works, and was repulsed with canister at that range, General Harker losing an arm. General Wagner's brigade of Newton's division, supporting General Harker, was so severely handled that it is compelled to reorganize. Colonel Mitchell's brigade of Davis' division captured one line of rebel breastworks, which they still hold. McCook's brigade was also very severorks, and to the fact that they were well manned, thereby enabling the enemy to hold them securely against the assault. We have lost nearly two thousand officers and men, among them two brigade commanders, General Harker, commanding a brigade in Newton's division, and Colonel Dan. McCook, commanding a brigade in Jeff. Davis' division, both reported to be mortally wounded, besides some six or eight field officers killed. Both General Harker and Colonel McCook were wounded on the enemy's breastw
G. M. Dodge (search for this): chapter 9
hoochee, which proved one of the strongest pieces of field fortification I ever saw. This noisy but not desperate battle of July 4th was nothing less than an attack upon the strong works at Smyrna camp ground by the Sixteenth Corps under General Dodge, who pressed close up, and then sent a storming party of two brigades over them. It was one of the most gallant and successful fights of the Atlanta campaign, and one of the very few instances where heavy intrenchments were carried by directampaign, and one of the very few instances where heavy intrenchments were carried by direct assault. General Sherman ordered General McPherson to attack these lines, and he in turn, forwarded the order to General Dodge, directing the latter to move against the works if he thought he could carry them. They were stormed, General Noyes of Ohio, having prominent command in the charging column, and carried. As a consequence, the rebels' let go the strong line of Smyrna camp ground and retreated.
G. H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 9
or two more such assaults would use up this army. G. H. Thomas, Major-General. Sherman to Thomas, June 27, 4:10 P. M.: Schofield has gained the crossing of Olley's Creek, on the Sandtown road, e batteries in the manner proposed by Davis. I doubt if we can resort to regular approaches. Thomas to Sherman, June 27, 6 P. M.: The assault of the enemy's works in my front was well arranged, anr enfilading the enemy's works. We took between ninety and one hundred prisoners. Sherman to Thomas, June 27, evening: Let your troops fortify as close up to the enemy as possible. Get good posit Hooker and Schofield the first day we occupied our present ground. The excuses made to General Thomas for the assault in the last part of the above dispatch are significant. The same evening t us more lives than we can spare. And yet at 9 o'clock the same evening he telegraphed General Thomas: Are you willing to risk the move on Fulton, cutting loose from our railroad? It would
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