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Rose River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
few days later Burnside submitted to the President his plan for the campaign, and it was approved, though reluctantly. McClellan's plan had been to interpose between Lee's divided forces. Already he was not far from such a position. From Longstreet's corps to Jackson's was over 40 miles by the roads across the mountains, and McClellan's forces were within 20 miles of either. But Lee could have delayed a march upon either, and, by falling back, might unite his two corps, behind the Robertson River, before accepting battle. This had been Lee's plan, if the threat of Jackson's position upon the Federal flank should fail to prevent their advance. Burnside's organization was as follows:— Grand Divs.corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Right Grand Division2d CorpsHancockCaldwell, Meagher, Zook CouchHoward FrenchSully, Owen, Hall, Kimball, Palmer, Andrews8 Batteries Sumner9th Corps WillcoxSturgis GettyPoe, Christ, Leasure Nagle, Ferrero Hawkins, Harland6 Batteries Centre Grand
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
get back. The three days rations, brought on the persons of the men, were exhausted, and the supply trains could not be moved up. To aid the return, all the available force was put to work to corduroy the rotten roads. Next morning the army floundered and staggered back to the old camps, and so ended a movement that will always live, in the recollection of the army, as the Mud march, and which remains a striking exemplification of the enormous difficulties incident to winter campaigning in Va. Burnside's plan had been a good one, and his army, with the 11th and 12th corps, had numbered on Jan. 20, 152,516 present for duty, besides 45,239 in the defences of Washington. But for the rain-storm — the Act of God— he certainly had reasonable ground to hope for success. But he was not disposed to lay the whole blame upon the storm. He had been greatly dissatisfied with Franklin, and his conduct of his command, at the battle of Fredericksburg, and he now keenly resented hostile crit
Lee's Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
the Phillips house, on a commanding hill a mile north of the river. Lee made his headquarters on a hill, since called Lee's Hill, overlooking Hazel Run and the eastern half of the field in front of the town. Two 30-Pr. Parrott rifles were locatedoon to fire upon the enemy's right flank. His left flank was also partially exposed to the fire of the two Parrotts on Lee's Hill. The infantry in the sunken road and ditch numbered at the commencement of the action only about 2000; but in support He threw forward Dickenson's battery and Ferrero's brigade. The battery received a heavy fire from guns on and near Lee's Hill, and was soon disabled and withdrawn, Dickenson being killed. Ferrero advanced from the lower part of the city to the ashes of their muskets, and infantry and artillery replied from Marye's Hill, from across Hazel Run, and from guns upon Lee's Hill. They crossed the ditch, however, and had advanced quite close to the sunken road, when suddenly the infantry in it op
Monocacy River (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
upplies would be on hand within three days. Meanwhile, on Oct. 10 a fresh trouble arose. Stuart with 1800 cavalry and Pelham's battery had been sent by Lee upon a raid. Fording the Potomac, some 15 miles above Williamsport, at dawn on the 10th, by dark Stuart reached Chambersburg, where he burned a machine-shop, many loaded cars, and a supply depot, paroled 285 sick and wounded Federals, and gathered about 500 horses. Next morning he moved to Emmitsburg, and thence below the mouth of the Monocacy, where he recrossed the Potomac, on the forenoon of the 12th. The distance travelled had been 126 miles, of which the last 80 from Chambersburg were accomplished without a halt. An epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease was prevailing at this time among the enemy's cavalry, The same disease, sore tongue and soft hoof, was complained of by Lee on Nov. 7 to the Sec. of War, as affecting his cavalry. and the desperate efforts to intercept Stuart, made with reduced forces, put much of it out
Two Bridges (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
r's Neck, discovered Jackson's camps, and Burnside knew that his designs were disclosed. The discovery suggested an alternate piece of strategy. If he could cross at Fredericksburg, and rapidly push a force around Lee's right at Hamilton's Crossing, he might interpose between the forces about Skinker's Neck and those in front of Fredericksburg. The pressure upon him to fight was great, and on Dec. 10 the orders were issued for a crossing that night. The programme was as follows: — Two bridges were to be thrown across the river at the upper end of the town, one bridge at the lower end, and two about a mile below the town. Where the bridges were in pairs, one was for the use of artillery and one for infantry. The pontoon trains were to arrive opposite the chosen sites at 3 A. M., and unload the boats and material. By daylight this was to be finished and the boats placed in the river. The bridges were then to be built in from two to three hours. In length they would be from 4
Swan Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
y would not be so likely to make raids north of it. And on Oct. 25, he telegraphed McClellan in reply to a despatch about sore-tongued and fatigued horses, Will you pardon me for asking what the horses of your army have done, since the battle of Antietam, that fatigues anything? On Oct. 26, McClellan put his army in motion, 19 days after his receipt of the President's order. By this time he was willing to adopt the line of advance east of the Blue Ridge, as the stage of water in the Potomac River now made all fords impracticable. The crossing was made at Berlin, about 10 miles below Harper's Ferry. Pontoon bridges were laid, and the army crossed over rather leisurely, the last of it, Franklin's corps, on Nov. 1 and 2. We will now return to the Confederates, who, since Sharpsburg, have been resting and recuperating between Winchester and Bunker Hill. Our base of supplies was now Staunton, more than 100 miles distant, but over fairly good roads. Our trains were actively at
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ention, and Lee, on the 15th, had sent a regiment of cavalry, one of infantry, and a battery to reenforce four companies of infantry and a battery already at Fredericksburg. Orders were also sent to destroy the railroad from Fredericksburg to Acquia Creek. On the 17th it was learned that gunboats and transports had entered Acquia Creek, on which W. H. F. Lee's brigade of cavalry was despatched in that direction, and Stuart was ordered to force a crossing of the Rappahannock and reconnoitre towAcquia Creek, on which W. H. F. Lee's brigade of cavalry was despatched in that direction, and Stuart was ordered to force a crossing of the Rappahannock and reconnoitre toward Warrenton. This was done on the 18th, and the enemy's general movement was discovered. A part of Longstreet's corps was put in motion on the 18th, and the remainder followed next day. Sumner's corps arrived at Falmouth on the 17th, and an artillery duel ensued, across the river, rashly provoked by the Confederates, who had orders to oppose any force attempting to cross. It really came near inducing the enemy to cross, though under orders from Burnside not to do so. For under the superi
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
his Emancipation Proclamation and was waiting for a victory to produce a favorable state of feeling for its issuance. Sharpsburg was now claimed as a victory, and, on Sept. 22, the Proclamation was issued, freeing all slaves in any State which shouher leisurely, the last of it, Franklin's corps, on Nov. 1 and 2. We will now return to the Confederates, who, since Sharpsburg, have been resting and recuperating between Winchester and Bunker Hill. Our base of supplies was now Staunton, more mmanding positions on the north bank, could always afford a safe retreat to a beaten enemy, as the Antietam had done at Sharpsburg. This was undoubtedly true, as was soon afterward proved when the battle took place. At the North Anna the enemy, if oped into a fearful example of successive attacks by small forces; the same vicious game which had lost 2d Manassas and Sharpsburg. But Burnside was now obstinate, and was ordering in fresh troops upon each of his two battle-fields. The turn of How
Telegraph (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
re which proved of great value. The Confederate line occupied a range of low hills nearly parallel to the river and a few hundred yards back from the town. The Telegraph road, sunken from three to five feet below the surface, skirted the bottom of these hills for about 800 yards, until it reached the valley of Hazel Run, into whider went on to tell Franklin what Sumner was to be doing at the same time. He was also to send a division or more up the Plank road to its intersection with the Telegraph road, where they will divide with the view of seizing the heights on both of these roads. Then the order set forth what he hoped to accomplish. Holding these ts division. This charge of Griffin's was the eleventh separate effort made up to this time. But the infantry fire met was now being constantly increased, the Telegraph road affording the opportunity. Cobb had been killed and Cooke, soon after, severely wounded early in the affair. On the latter event, Kershaw with his brigade
Deep Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
d to his support. One of them, Burns's, of the 9th corps, was already across the Rappahannock and on the left of Sumner, separated from Franklin's right only by Deep Run, across which bridges had been laid. The other two were Sickles's and Birney's divisions of the 3d corps, of Hooker's grand division, which was still upon the n Getty's division of two brigades under cover of the bluffs at the mouth of Hazel Run. Burns's division of three brigades on the left connected with Franklin at Deep Run, and was under his orders. During the day Burns went across Deep Run to Franklin's support. When French's division was advanced, Sturgis was ordered to suppoDeep Run to Franklin's support. When French's division was advanced, Sturgis was ordered to support it upon its left. He threw forward Dickenson's battery and Ferrero's brigade. The battery received a heavy fire from guns on and near Lee's Hill, and was soon disabled and withdrawn, Dickenson being killed. Ferrero advanced from the lower part of the city to the left of the ground over which French and Hancock had fought.
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