hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. H. F. Lee 1,088 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 999 7 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 676 0 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 496 10 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 465 1 Browse Search
Old Joe Hooker 397 1 Browse Search
McClellan 392 2 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 383 1 Browse Search
Ewell 347 7 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 342 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. Search the whole document.

Found 1,589 total hits in 248 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
lies, he would answer, Stop running passenger trains, and I can run more freight trains and supply you. The great need of rations for the coming summer led the War Dept. to send Longstreet with two divisions for a campaign in the vicinity of Suffolk. Its object was to collect forage and provisions from counties near the Federal lines. The campaign was not initiated by Lee, and he thought that one division would have been sufficient, as the result showed. For the little fighting done was rts from the balloons and signal officers had informed him of the march of a force toward Chancellorsville, estimated at two corps. Rumors had also been brought by deserters, the night before, that Hood's division had rejoined Lee, coming from Suffolk, but Hooker's information from Fortress Monroe should have shown that to be impossible. There is no sign of any hesitation upon his part until 2 P. M. At that hour he wired Butterfield, his chief of staff, at Falmouth:— From character of in
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ith the orders repeated. Hooker has been severely blamed for these orders, subverting all the carefully prepared plans only published to the army that morning. It is interesting to learn the cause. Reports from the balloons and signal officers had informed him of the march of a force toward Chancellorsville, estimated at two corps. Rumors had also been brought by deserters, the night before, that Hood's division had rejoined Lee, coming from Suffolk, but Hooker's information from Fortress Monroe should have shown that to be impossible. There is no sign of any hesitation upon his part until 2 P. M. At that hour he wired Butterfield, his chief of staff, at Falmouth:— From character of information have suspended attack. The enemy may attack me, —I will try it. Tell Sedgwick to keep a sharp lookout, and attack if he can succeed. This despatch makes clear Hooker's mind. He realized from the rapid manner of Lee's approach, and from the sounds of battle already heard, both
Lee's Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
o guns in observation at Banks Ford, Wilcox marched to Taylor's Hill. About 10 A. M., Gibbon having reported that an attack on our extreme left was impracticable, and Howe's division, making no progress east of Hazel Run, Sedgwick had no recourse but to renew his attack upon Marye's Hill by main force. He accordingly prepared a much stronger assault than that of the morning. Newton's division, supported by Burnham's brigade, was to attack Marye's Hill, while Howe's division assaulted Lee's Hill beyond Hazel Run. This force numbered about 14,000 men, with an abundant artillery. Across Hazel Creek were seven guns of Cutt's and Cabell's battalions, and the two remaining regiments of Barksdale's brigade and one La. of Hays's brigade. About 11 A. M., both Newton and Howe renewed the assault. Newton advanced rapidly through the fire of the few Confederate guns, but recoiled soon after the infantry opened, although Barksdale's line was so thin that it scarcely averaged a man to
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
fantry, he might have rewarded Stuart on the spot by promoting him to the now vacant command of Jackson's corps. Ewell, who did succeed Jackson, was always loved and admired, but he was not always equal to his opportunities, as we shall see at Gettysburg. Stuart's qualities were just what were needed, for he was young, he was not maimed, and he had boldness, persistence, and magnetism in very high degree. Lee once said that he would have won Gettysburg, had he had Jackson with him. Who so worGettysburg, had he had Jackson with him. Who so worthy to succeed Jackson as the man who had successfully replaced him on his last and greatest field? Confederate casualties COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTALSTREN. S. C. Kershaw's Brig.12902104 Miss. Barksdale's Brig.43208341592 Ga. Semmes's Brig.8549226603 Ga. Wofford's Brig.744799562 Cabell's Battn. A521228 McLaws's Div.2191,2903801,8898,800 Ala. Wilcox's Brig.7237291535 Va. Mahone's Brig.2413497255 Miss. Posey's Brig.4118465290 Ga. Wright's Brig.25271296 Fla. Perry's Br
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
hould have shown that to be impossible. There is no sign of any hesitation upon his part until 2 P. M. At that hour he wired Butterfield, his chief of staff, at Falmouth:— From character of information have suspended attack. The enemy may attack me, —I will try it. Tell Sedgwick to keep a sharp lookout, and attack if he can h similar result. Sedgwick was now convinced that a heavy force confronted him, and he waited for Gibbon's division of the 2d corps. This had just crossed from Falmouth, and it made an effort upon the extreme Confederate left. It proved futile on account of the canal along the front at that part of the field, which was defendeds about night when his whole division was concentrated. The enemy was holding Gibbon's entire division idle in Fredericksburg, guarding the pontoon bridges to Falmouth. Had Gibbon moved up on Sedgwick's flank to Banks Ford, his division would have counted for something in the next day's affairs. His force was just what Sedgwi
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
food. Early in the war, officers received no rations, but were allowed to purchase from the commissaries, for themselves and servants. But as rations became scarce, the privilege of purchase was taken away, and a ration was given each officer. Nothing, however, was allowed for a servant. Thereafter, officers had to divide with their servants and supply the deficiency as best they could. Personally, my mess received constant supplies of bacon and peas from our country homes in S. C. and Ga., and other articles giving the most nourishment in the least space. Our scarcities were due entirely to insufficient railroad transportation. Before the war, our roads had but a light traffic. They were now loaded with a very heavy one, and as cars, engines, and rails wore out, they could not be replaced. When complaint was made to the commissary-general of insufficient supplies, he would answer, Stop running passenger trains, and I can run more freight trains and supply you. The gre
Moss Neck (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
s repulsed. Hazel Grove guns. Federals withdraw. Lee and Stuart meet. Sedgwick's advance. Wilcox on Taylor's Hill. assaults renewed. Early falls back. Salem Church. casualties. Early's division. Lee organizes an attack. Sedgwick driven across. Soon after the battle of Fredericksburg, Lee placed his army in winter quarters. Jackson was extended along the river, below the town, as far as Port Royal, his own headquarters being at a hunting lodge on the lawn of a Mr. Corbin, at Moss Neck, 11 miles below Fredericksburg. Longstreet was encamped from a little above Fredericksburg to Massaponax Creek. Lee established his headquarters in a camp a short distance in rear of Hamilton's Crossing. Most of the artillery was sent back to the North Anna River for convenience of supply. My own battalion occupied a wood at Mt. Carmel church, five miles north of Hanover Junction, the horses being sheltered in an adjoining pine thicket. On the occasion of Burnside's Mud March, we mar
Fairview Plateau (Montana, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
make such a diversion, for the attack would have met an overwhelming force. Its only hope of success was to reunite with Lee at Chancellorsville with the least delay. Meanwhile, partaking of the impatience of Jackson, his chief of artillery, Col. Crutchfield, pushed some guns forward on the Plank road, and opened a random fire down it toward Chancellorsville, now less than a mile away. It was an unwise move, for it provoked a terrific response from the 34 guns now in position upon Fairview plateau. The Plank road was now crowded with troops and artillery in column, and the woods near it were full of the reorganizing brigades. Under such a fire, even in the dim light of the rising moon, great confusion soon resulted, and although actual casualities were few, it became necessary to discontinue our fire before order could be restored and the formation of the line of battle be resumed. Lane's N. C. brigade was at the head of Hill's division. One regiment, the 33d, was deployed
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
hile, the enemy had advanced guns to their skirmish-line, and presently began to sweep the Plank road with shell and canister. A litter was brought and Jackson placed in it, but a bearer was shot, and Jackson fell heavily on his wounded side. With great difficulty he was finally gotten to an ambulance, which already held his chief of artillery, Col. Crutchfield, with a shattered leg. During the night Jackson's left arm was amputated, and the next day he was taken in an ambulance via Spottsylvania, to a small house called Chandler's, near Guinea Station. For a few days his recovery was expected, but pneumonia supervened, and he died on May 10. In his last moments his mind wandered, and he was again upon the battle-field giving orders to his troops: Order A. P. Hill to prepare for action. Pass the infantry to the front. Tell Maj. Hawks —There was a pause for some moments, and then, calmly, the last words, Let us pass over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees. Jac
Fairview, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
tern brow of the Chancellorsville plateau, south of the Plank road. This position was known as Fairview, and it now became the key-point of the battle. In front of it the open ground extended about in line of battle in the forest north of the Plank road, with their left resting on the guns at Fairview. Here they promptly set to work to intrench themselves in the forest across the Plank road, anons. When Hooker found that the Confederate attack had come to a standstill in front of the Fairview line, with Sickles near Hazel Grove upon its right flank, he ordered Sickles to move forward byced off, as it were, and, changing its direction, it turned toward the Federal line in front of Fairview, where it approached the position of Knipe's and Ruger's brigades of Williams's division of thenes, there was still the spirit to traverse the bloody ground for the fourth time and storm the Fairview batteries. Guns had been brought to Hazel Grove from all the battalions on the field—Pegram
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...