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Prestonburg (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): entry brown-john
ons or suitable preparation beforehand. The desired end may be effectually secured by the means proposed; namely, the enjoyment of our inalienable rights. The fight of Osawatomie. Early in the morning of Aug. 30 the enemy's scouts approached to within one mile and a half of the western boundary of the town of Osawatomie. At this place my son Frederick (who was not attached to my force) had lodged, with some four other young men from Lawrence, and a young man named Garrison, from Middle Creek. The scouts, led by a pro-slavery preacher named White, shot my son dead in the road, while he — as I have since ascertained — supposed them to be friendly. At the same time they butchered Mr. Garrison, and badly mangled one of the young men from Lawrence, who came with my son, leaving him for dead. This was not far from sunrise. I had stopped during the night about two and one-half miles from them, and nearly one mile from Osawatomie. I had no organized force, but only some twelve o
Randolph, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry brown-john
James M. Mason, author of the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, as its chairman, was appointed to investigate the subject. The result was the obtaining of positive proof that Brown had no accomplices, and only about twenty-five followers. Although Brown's mad attempt to free the slaves was a total failure, it proved to be one of the important events which speedily brought about the result he so much desired. Autobiographical notes: Brown's letter on slavery to his brother Frederick. Randolph, Pa., Nov. 21, 1834. Dear Brother,--As I have had only one letter from Hudson since you left here, and that some weeks since, I begin to get uneasy and apprehensive that all is not well. I had satisfied my mind about it for some time, in expectation of seeing father here, but I begin to give that up for the present. Since you left me I have been trying to devise some means whereby I might do something in a practical way for my poor fellow-men who are in bondage, and having fully consulte
United States (United States) (search for this): entry brown-john
a Provisional Constitution and Ordinances for the People of the United States was adopted-not, as the instrument declared, for the overthrow cations and inventions of his own. to a mountain warfare in the United States. He stated that he had read all the books upon insurrectionaryus, either by the militia of the States or by the armies of the United States, we purposed to defeat first the militia, and next, if possible, the troops of the United States; and then organize the free blacks under the provisional constitution, which would carve out for the locali Provisional constitution and ordinances for the people of the United States. [This is the preamble of the constitution drawn up by Brownble. Whereas slavery, throughout its entire existence in the United States, is none other than a most barbarous, unprovoked, and unjustifi Declaration of Independence: Therefore, we. citizens of the United States, and the oppressed people who by a recent decision of the Supre
Gilead (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry brown-john
f your number be arrested, you must collect together as quickly as possible, so as to outnumber your adversaries who are taking an active part against you. Let no able-bodied man appear on the ground unequipped, or with his weapons exposed to view: let that be understood beforehand. Your plans must be known only to yourself, and with the understanding that all traitors must die. wherever caught and proven to be guilty. Whosoever is fearful or afraid, let him return and depart early from Mount Gilead (Judges, VII. 3; Deut. XX. 8). Give all cowards an opportunity to show it on condition of holding their peace. Do not delay one moment after you are ready: you will lose all your resolution if you do. Let the first blow be the signal for all to engage; and when engaged do not do your work by halves, but make clean work with your enemies,--and be sure you meddle not with any others. By going about your business quietly, you will get the job disposed of before the number that an uproar w
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry brown-john
ourageous, and intensely earnest, he sought to be an instrument for the abolition of African slavery from the republic. The idea that he might become a liberator was conceived so early as 1839. In May, 1859, he made his first movement in an attempt to liberate the slaves in Virginia, which ended so disastrously to himself at Harper's Ferry. There seemed to be a peculiar serenity and calmness in the public mind about public affairs in the fall of 1859, when suddenly a rumor went out of Baltimore that the abolitionists had seized the government armory and arsenal at Harper's Ferry, at the junction of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers, and that a general insurrection of the slaves in Virginia was imminent. The rumor was mostly true. John Brown had suddenly appeared at Harper's Ferry with a few followers, to induce the slaves of Virginia to rise in insurrection and assert their right to freedom. With a few white followers and twelve slaves from Missouri, he went into Canada West,
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry brown-john
The rumor was mostly true. John Brown had suddenly appeared at Harper's Ferry with a few followers, to induce the slaves of Virginia to rise in insurrection and assert their right to freedom. With a few white followers and twelve slaves from Missouri, he went into Canada West, and at Chatham a convention of sympathizers was held in May, 1859, whereat a Provisional Constitution and Ordinances for the People of the United States was adopted-not, as the instrument declared, for the overthrow of a few words to say. In the first place. I deny everything but what I have all along admitted — the design on my part to free the slaves. I intended certainly to have made a clean thing of that matter, as I did last winter, when I went into Missouri and there took slaves without the snapping of a gun on either side. moved them through the country, and finally left them in Canada. I designed to have done the same thing again, on a larger scale. That was all I intended. I never did intend
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry brown-john
liberate the slaves in Virginia, which ended so disastrously to himself at Harper's Ferry. There seemed to be a peculiar serenity and calmness in the public mind more that the abolitionists had seized the government armory and arsenal at Harper's Ferry, at the junction of the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers, and that a general i imminent. The rumor was mostly true. John Brown had suddenly appeared at Harper's Ferry with a few followers, to induce the slaves of Virginia to rise in insurrectmer of 1859 in preparations for his work. He hired a farm a few miles from Harper's Ferry, where he was known by the name of Smith. One by one his followers joined Brown, with seventeen white men and five negroes, stole into the village of Harper's Ferry, put out the street-lights, seized the government armory and the railway-brabroad, and before night a large number of Virginia militia had gathered at Harper's Ferry. Struggles between these and Brown's followers ensued, in which the two so
Russia (Russia) (search for this): entry brown-john
uld arouse more sympathy throughout the nation than the accumulated wrongs and sufferings of more than three millions of our submissive colored population. We need not mention the Greeks struggling against the oppressive Turks, the Poles against Russia, nor the Hungarians against Austria and Russia combined, to prove this. No jury can be found in the Northern States that would convict a man for defending his rights to the last extremity. This is well understood by Southern Congressmen, who inRussia combined, to prove this. No jury can be found in the Northern States that would convict a man for defending his rights to the last extremity. This is well understood by Southern Congressmen, who insisted that the right of trial by jury should not be granted to the fugitive. Colored people have ten times the number of fast friends among the whites than they suppose, and would have ten times the number they now have were they but half as much in earnest to secure their dearest rights as they are to ape the follies and extravagances of their white neighbors, and to indulge in idle show, in ease, and in luxury. Just think of the money expended by individuals in your behalf in the past twenty
Sandisfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry brown-john
Brown, John, 1744- patriot; born in Sandisfield, Mass., Oct. 19, 1744; was graduated at Yale College in 1761; became a lawyer and active patriot; entered Canada in disguise (1774-75) to obtain information and secure the co-operation of the Canadians with the other colonists, and aided Ethan Allen in the capture of Ticonderoga. He was active with Montgomery in the siege of Quebec. In August, 1776, he was made lieutenant-colonel, and, on the morning of Sept. 18, 1776, he surprised the outposts of Ticonderoga, set free 100 American prisoners, captured four companies of British regulars, a quantity of stores and cannon, and destroyed a number of boats and an armed sloop. He left the service because of his detestation of Benedict Arnold, but continued to act with the militia. He was killed by Indians in the Mohawk Valley, Oct. 19, 1780. abolitionist; born in Torrington, Conn., May 9, 1800; hanged in Charlestown, Va., Dec. 2, 1859; was a descendant of Peter Brown of the May
Osawatomie (Kansas, United States) (search for this): entry brown-john
le preparation beforehand. The desired end may be effectually secured by the means proposed; namely, the enjoyment of our inalienable rights. The fight of Osawatomie. Early in the morning of Aug. 30 the enemy's scouts approached to within one mile and a half of the western boundary of the town of Osawatomie. At this placOsawatomie. At this place my son Frederick (who was not attached to my force) had lodged, with some four other young men from Lawrence, and a young man named Garrison, from Middle Creek. The scouts, led by a pro-slavery preacher named White, shot my son dead in the road, while he — as I have since ascertained — supposed them to be friendly. At the sameh my son, leaving him for dead. This was not far from sunrise. I had stopped during the night about two and one-half miles from them, and nearly one mile from Osawatomie. I had no organized force, but only some twelve or fifteen new recruits, who were ordered to leave their preparations for breakfast and follow me into the town
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