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major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in Brunswick, Jan. 6, 1800. His Memoirs, letters, and journals in America, edited by Max Von Eelking, were translated by William L. Stone. His wife, Fredericka Charlotte Louisa, accompanied him to America, and wrote charming letters, and a journal, which were published in Boston in 1799, of which a translation was made by Mr. Stone. She was a daughter of the Frederick Adolph Riedesel. Prussian minister, Massow. She died in Berlin, March 29, 1808.
major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in Brunswick, Jan. 6, 1800. His Memoirs, letters, and journals in America, edited by Max Von Eelking, were translated by William L. Stone. His wife, Fredericka Charlotte Louisa, accompanied him to America, and wrote charming letters, and a journal, which were published in Boston in 1799, of which a translation was made by Mr. Stone. She was a daughter of the Frederick Adolph Riedesel. Prussian minister, Massow. She died in Berlin, March 29, 1808.
Riedesel, Baron Frederick Adolph 1738-1800 Military officer: born in Lauterbach, Rhine-Hesse, Germany. June 3, 1738. Leaving the College of Marburg, he entered the English army as ensign, and served in the Seven Years War under Prince Ferdinand. In 1760 he became captain of the Hessian Hussars, and was made lieutenant-colonel of the Black Hussars in 1762, adjutant-general of the Brunswick army in 1767, colonel of carabineers in 1772, and a major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in
Baron Frederick Adolph Riedesel (search for this): entry riedesel-baron-frederick-adolph
Riedesel, Baron Frederick Adolph 1738-1800 Military officer: born in Lauterbach, Rhine-Hesse, Germany. June 3, 1738. Leaving the College of Marburg, he entered the English army as ensign, and served in the Seven Years War under Prince Ferdinand. In 1760 he became captain of the Hessian Hussars, and was made lieutenant-colonel of the Black Hussars in 1762, adjutant-general of the Brunswick army in 1767, colonel of carabineers in 1772, and a major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in B
major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in Brunswick, Jan. 6, 1800. His Memoirs, letters, and journals in America, edited by Max Von Eelking, were translated by William L. Stone. His wife, Fredericka Charlotte Louisa, accompanied him to America, and wrote charming letters, and a journal, which were published in Boston in 1799, of which a translation was made by Mr. Stone. She was a daughter of the Frederick Adolph Riedesel. Prussian minister, Massow. She died in Berlin, March 29, 1808.
major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in Brunswick, Jan. 6, 1800. His Memoirs, letters, and journals in America, edited by Max Von Eelking, were translated by William L. Stone. His wife, Fredericka Charlotte Louisa, accompanied him to America, and wrote charming letters, and a journal, which were published in Boston in 1799, of which a translation was made by Mr. Stone. She was a daughter of the Frederick Adolph Riedesel. Prussian minister, Massow. She died in Berlin, March 29, 1808.
e, Germany. June 3, 1738. Leaving the College of Marburg, he entered the English army as ensign, and served in the Seven Years War under Prince Ferdinand. In 1760 he became captain of the Hessian Hussars, and was made lieutenant-colonel of the Black Hussars in 1762, adjutant-general of the Brunswick army in 1767, colonel of carabineers in 1772, and a major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in Brunswick, Jan. 6, 1800. His Memoirs, letters, and journals in America, edited by Max Von Eelkin
Riedesel, Baron Frederick Adolph 1738-1800 Military officer: born in Lauterbach, Rhine-Hesse, Germany. June 3, 1738. Leaving the College of Marburg, he entered the English army as ensign, and served in the Seven Years War under Prince Ferdinand. In 1760 he became captain of the Hessian Hussars, and was made lieutenant-colonel of the Black Hussars in 1762, adjutant-general of the Brunswick army in 1767, colonel of carabineers in 1772, and a major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in B
the Black Hussars in 1762, adjutant-general of the Brunswick army in 1767, colonel of carabineers in 1772, and a major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in Brunswick, Jan. 6, 1800. His Memoirs, letters, and journals in America, edited by Max Von Eelking, were translated by William L. Stone. His wife, Fredericka Charlotte Louisa, accompanied him to America, and wrote charming letters, and a journal, which were published in Boston in 1799, of which a translation was made by Mr. Stone. She
Riedesel, Baron Frederick Adolph 1738-1800 Military officer: born in Lauterbach, Rhine-Hesse, Germany. June 3, 1738. Leaving the College of Marburg, he entered the English army as ensign, and served in the Seven Years War under Prince Ferdinand. In 1760 he became captain of the Hessian Hussars, and was made lieutenant-colonel of the Black Hussars in 1762, adjutant-general of the Brunswick army in 1767, colonel of carabineers in 1772, and a major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in B
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