hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
G. T. Beauregard 3,199 167 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 638 0 Browse Search
Florida (Florida, United States) 544 0 Browse Search
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) 520 4 Browse Search
Savannah (Georgia, United States) 480 26 Browse Search
Headquarters (Washington, United States) 466 0 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 382 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 368 54 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 356 0 Browse Search
Comdg 353 131 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

Found 608 total hits in 124 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
tive and polite people among whom he had been thrown. He commenced his administration of affairs there by removing the guns from Cole's Island, and opening the Stono River to the invasion of the Federal fleet and, army; after which there was no quiet for Charleston. Two unfortunate circumstances had further contributed to the dal Pemberton's orders. He had adopted a line from Secessionville, on the east, guarding the water approaches of Light-House Inlet, to Fort Pemberton, up the Stono River—a distance of fully five miles—thus giving up to the enemy, for his offensive operations, a large extent of James Island. General Beauregard subsequently reducerdered his chief-engineer to obstruct and defend the mouths of the Cooper and Ashley rivers. That officer was also instructed closely to examine both banks of the Stono, from Church Flats to the Wappoo Cut, and place there such obstructions as might impede the progress of the enemy, and prevent him from turning our works in that v
Alabaha River (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
, your obdt. servt., Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Thus it appears that, immediately after his arrival in Charleston, General Beauregard began to concentrate as many heavy guns as were available in the first line of works, including Fort Sumter, so that they might be used with greater advantage against any naval attack. And the War Department was called upon to allow the transfer to Charleston of other heavy pieces from Ovenbluff, on the Tombigbee River, and Choctaw Bluff, on the Alabama River, where they could be of no use and might be easily dispensed with. The application was granted, provided no objection should be made by the commander of the Department of Alabama and Western Florida. No objection was made. But General Beauregard's efforts did not stop there. He asked the War Department for additional guns, which he considered indispensable for the safety of Charleston, as he placed no great reliance upon the strength and stability of the boom then being constructed
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
tain the line, remedying the defects by long and numerous traverses. Two ironclad gunboats, carrying four guns each, will be ready for service in two weeks, as an important auxiliary to the works defending all parts of the harbor, and in that connection it will be important to secure for them a harbor of refuge and a general depot up the Cooper River as soon as the guns for its protection can be secured. G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. D. N. Ingraham, Com. Comdg. C. S. Naval Forces, Charleston Harbor. That sketch of the situation, together with General Beauregard's Notes of Inspection, dated September 24th, and General Pemberton's minimum estimate of men and guns required for a proper defence of the Department, give so complete and correct a statement of its condition and needs, at that time, that we deem it unnecessary to add anything further. On the day following this conference of officers General Beauregard began to carry out its conclusions, as to the armament of the di
Wappoo Creek (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Ashley and Cooper rivers, and we have no guns disposable for the armament of interior harbor defences. 15th. Should gunboats effect a lodgment in the harbor and in the Stono, the troops and armaments on James Island may be withdrawn, especially after the construction of a bridge and road across James Island Creek, about midway the island, near Holmes house. From the western part they can be withdrawn under cover of Fort Pemberton. McLeod's battery is intended to protect the mouth of Wappoo Creek, and Lawton's battery the mouth of James Island Creek, when armed. 16th. With the harbor in the hands of the enemy, the city could still be held by an infantry force by the erection of strong barricades, and with an arrangement of traverses in the streets. The line of works on the neck could also be held against a naval and land attack by the construction of frequent and long traverses. The approaches thereto are covered by woods in front; possibly a more advanced position might hav
Headquarters (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
. General Beauregard adopted this estimate as a basis for his future calculations, and on that day assumed command in an order which ran as follows: Headquarters, Dept. S. C. & Ga., Charleston, Sept. 24th, 1862. I assume command of this Department pursuant to Paragraph XV., Special Orders No. 202, Adjutant and Inspecchors could not long withstand the force of the tide. General Beauregard now caused the following instructions to be given to his chief of ordnance: Headquarters, Department of S. C. And Ga., Charleston, S. C., October 1st, 1862. Major J. J. Pope, Chief of Ordnance, etc.: Major,—The commanding general instructs me toas possible, secure that region of country. See Colonel Walker's letter, in Appendix to this chapter. General Beauregard's answer was as follows: Headquarters, Dept. S. C. and Ga., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 8th, 1862. Col. W. S. Walker, Comdg. Third Mil. Dist., McPhersonville, S. C.: Colonel,—Your letter of 3d insta
Ashley River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ront, if the enemy reach the interior harbor with ironclads. It can then only be defended by infantry against landing of troops. 14th. We have no resources at present for the construction of efficient obstructions at the mouth of, or in, the Ashley and Cooper rivers, and we have no guns disposable for the armament of interior harbor defences. 15th. Should gunboats effect a lodgment in the harbor and in the Stono, the troops and armaments on James Island may be withdrawn, especially afte of the people and State to defend the city to the last extremity—as he was disposed to do—to prepare, out of its limits, a place of refuge for non-combatants. He ordered his chief-engineer to obstruct and defend the mouths of the Cooper and Ashley rivers. That officer was also instructed closely to examine both banks of the Stono, from Church Flats to the Wappoo Cut, and place there such obstructions as might impede the progress of the enemy, and prevent him from turning our works in that vi
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
success, for a time, but the stone anchors could not long withstand the force of the tide. General Beauregard now caused the following instructions to be given to his chief of ordnance: Headquarters, Department of S. C. And Ga., Charleston, S. C., October 1st, 1862. Major J. J. Pope, Chief of Ordnance, etc.: Major,—The commanding general instructs me to direct that the order of 25th ult. stands thus: That you cause the immediate transfer of the 10-inch, columbiad (old pattern), nd be sent him to remedy the evil, and, as far as possible, secure that region of country. See Colonel Walker's letter, in Appendix to this chapter. General Beauregard's answer was as follows: Headquarters, Dept. S. C. and Ga., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 8th, 1862. Col. W. S. Walker, Comdg. Third Mil. Dist., McPhersonville, S. C.: Colonel,—Your letter of 3d instant, with its enclosures, has been received. Your instructions to the Commanding Officer at Hardeeville and to your picke
Hardeeville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
hat reinforcements should be sent him to remedy the evil, and, as far as possible, secure that region of country. See Colonel Walker's letter, in Appendix to this chapter. General Beauregard's answer was as follows: Headquarters, Dept. S. C. and Ga., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 8th, 1862. Col. W. S. Walker, Comdg. Third Mil. Dist., McPhersonville, S. C.: Colonel,—Your letter of 3d instant, with its enclosures, has been received. Your instructions to the Commanding Officer at Hardeeville and to your pickets are approved of; hone more in detail can be furnished you from here. Our means are so limited at present, that it is impossible to guard effectually the whole country and line of railroad, from here to Savannah, against a determined attack of the enemy; but we must endeavor to make up in zeal and activity what we lack in numbers. I shall, however, send you a light battery of artillery, to be posted by you wherever most advantageous. Being still unacquainted with the
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
he is assigned to duty in South Carolina and Georgia. he reaches Charleston on the 15th of Septems assigning him to duty in South Carolina and Georgia, with Headquarters at Charleston; but he did oast and other defences of South Carolina and Georgia. We quote the following passage from his rep operating on the coast of South Carolina and Georgia. General Long had forgotten that General B as follows: Headquarters, Dept. S. C. & Ga., Charleston, Sept. 24th, 1862. I assume comm: Headquarters, Department of S. C. And Ga., Charleston, S. C., October 1st, 1862. Major J.s assistance. They were to be withdrawn from Georgia, General Mercer's command. Although fears weoffensive movement against South Carolina and Georgia, General Beauregard, whose forces were also ve enemy along the coast of South Carolina and Georgia could be ascertained with any degree of certahe coast of South Carolina (from Georgetown), Georgia, and Florida, where the enemy's ships or flee[5 more...]
Greenwood (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ne from Secessionville, on the east, guarding the water approaches of Light-House Inlet, to Fort Pemberton, up the Stono River—a distance of fully five miles—thus giving up to the enemy, for his offetwo and a quarter miles, from Secessionville to Fort Pringle, on the Stono, four miles below Fort Pemberton. This was not only a much shorter line, but a stronger and more advantageous one, as it grey the island, near Holmes house. From the western part they can be withdrawn under cover of Fort Pemberton. McLeod's battery is intended to protect the mouth of Wappoo Creek, and Lawton's battery the transfer of the 10-inch, columbiad (old pattern), now in the Water Battery, to the left of Fort Pemberton, to Fort Sumter, with carriage, implements, and ammunition. Also that three 32-pounders, smm Fort Sumter, and on barbette carriages, be moved to the said Water Battery, to the left of Fort Pemberton. You will likewise transfer to the new batteries, on Sullivan's Island, the 8-inch columbia
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...