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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Joe Hooker or search for Joe Hooker in all documents.

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A base was established at West Point, and abandoned when it was found that General Hooker was not likely to advance again. The present is the proper occasion for the army of Suffolk was in no manner connected with the campaign planned by General Hooker. The public has been under the impression that I was charged with a co-operative movement on Richmond. Such was not the case. General Hooker, with his vast army, was confident of destroying Lee, taking the rebel capital at pleasure, and cne wing of Lee's army, which outnumbered it nearly two to one (as I assured General Hooker), that he might win the crowning victor of the war. Had he been successful the Potomac. Is not the army of Suffolk entitled to as much credit as if General Hooker had been victorious? Certainly. How that credit shall be estimated, is arrreet with Lee at Chancellorsville. If Lee, with fifty odd thousand, forced General Hooker over the Rappahannock, no doubt that with ninety thousand he would have dem
er part of the line, the left of Schofield and Hooker, upon which he, to-day, made a desperate assauinutes from the time the inquiry left him. General Hooker is one mile from General Schofield, and dinsequence he has — retreated. On Friday last, Hooker's and Schofield's corps moved to the right sompport. The troops on the right, consisting of Hooker's and Palmer's corps and Newton's division of ted and pursued army. In the rear of Palmer,. Hooker, and Newton, there had been built over ten brissing close along Camp creek Valley, threw General Hooker's corps across the head of the creek to thand evening of the fifteenth, during which General Hooker drove the enemy from several strong hills,. It was near four o'clock P. M. before General Hooker got his whole corps well in hand, when he s, and a stormy, dark night having set in, General Hooker was unable to drive the enemy from those rhe old Sandtown road. On the twenty-second General Hooker had advanced his line, with General Schofi[44 more...]
, but during the ensuing night retreated across the Etowah. While these operations were going on, General Jefferson C. Davis' division of Thomas' army was sent to Rome, capturing it with its forts and artillery, and its valuable mills and foundries. General Sherman, having given his army a few days' rest at this point, again put it in motion, on the twenty-third, for Dallas, with a view of turning the difficult pass at Allatoona. On the afternoon of the twenty-fifth the advance, under General Hooker, had a severe battle with the enemy, driving him back to New Hope Church, near Dallas. Several sharp encounters occurred at this point. The most important was on the twenty-eighth, when the enemy assaulted General McPherson at Dallas, but received a terrible and bloody repulse. On the fourth of June Johnston abandoned his intrenched position at New Hope Church, and retreated to the strong positions of Kenesaw, Pine and Lost mountains. He was forced to yield the two last named place
the prosecution of successful warfare. General Hooker was the first commander of the Army of theo give or receive assistance from each other. Hooker, Franklin, and Sumner's corps were on the righovements, I was under the impression, gave General Hooker an undue confidence as to his being masterand receive the attack of Sedgwick in rear and Hooker in front; a still worse dilemma. In the third day's fight at Chancellorsville, General Hooker was badly stunned by the concussion of a shell ags generally supposed, from the large force General Hooker had at his command. There is always one de actual number of men he has in hand. If General Hooker had not been injured at the commencement oposed invasion of Pennsylvania, upon which General Hooker acted immediately, and moved his army towaen our army had arrived at Frederick City, General Hooker was relieved from the command and General Meade was assigned in his place. General Hooker left the army in fine condition and discipline, and
far beyond us. After a spirited engagement of one hour and fifteen minutes they were compelled to withdraw. I laid off and on, but finding that they did not reappear, I dropped down the river and anchored. The steamer Commodore Reed, Lieutenant-commander Hooker, then came in sight. Captain Hooker requested me to drop down the river and ascertain if there were any guns at Jones' Point, also to communicate with your forces if possible. During the night I received orders to report at this placeed, Lieutenant-commander Hooker, then came in sight. Captain Hooker requested me to drop down the river and ascertain if there were any guns at Jones' Point, also to communicate with your forces if possible. During the night I received orders to report at this place; where I arrived at four o'clock P. M. I am much indebted to the naval forces for lying by me while my vessel was ashore, and assisting me in getting afloat. I am, Captain,your obedient servant, Arnold Harris, Commanding.
ng Brigadier-General Draper, commanding this post, accompanied by the following Staff: Captain P. H. Gibbs, Fourth Rhode Island, Assistant Adjutant General; Captain N. C. Goodwin, Quartermaster; Lieutenant A. Jenks, Aid-de-Camp; Lieutenant Scudder, Commissary of Subsistence; Lieutenant Jonley, Assistant Quartermaster; E. W. Walton, Surgeon. The land forces were conveyed on board the transports Georgia, Long Branch, Charleston, and Governor Hicks. The naval forces were under command of Commander Hooker, United States Navy, whose flagship was the Commodore Reed, together with the gunboats Fuchsia, Captain Street; Freeborn, Captain Arthurs, and the Teaser, Resolute, and Eureka. The land forces consisted of six hundred infantry, under the immediate charge of Captain Hart, Thirty-sixth United States cavalry volunteers, and fifty regular cavalry, under Lieutenant Denney. The naval land forces consisted of one hundred marines and sailors, under the charge of Captain Street, of the gunboat
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