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Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
on, all the light-draft steamers were kept until the last moment at Fortress Monroe, whence, early yesterday morning, they were despatched to the York river, and the work of embarking the troops, whose arrangements for the purpose had been already made, was begun promptly. Soon after the shades of evening closed over the camping-ground, the last tent was struck and the troops were all on board. General Butler's order to his subordinate Generals made it incumbent for them to repair to Hampton Roads as quickly as possible after dark, where they were to anchor for the night. At daybreak the order commanded an advance of the troops up the James river, convoyed by three army gunboats, under Brigadier-General Graham, and a naval force, consisting of five monitors and eleven gunboats, under Rear-Admiral Lee. The cavalry branch of the expedition is commanded by Brigadier-General A. V. Kautz, who, with a fine body of several thousand white troopers, left Suffolk, Va., also, at daylight
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
set her on fire. It was thought that a torpedo was attached to her, and she had been floated down and anchored at that point. In the fight of Monday last, the three Massachusetts regiments were encountered by General Hazard's brigade, of South Carolina, their regiments being the same numbers, Twenty-three, Twenty-five and Twenty-seven. They were badly whipped, and Captain Leroy Hammond, who was mortally wounded, told one of the surgeons, before his death, If we had known you were veterans the Thirteenth Indiana, Colonel Dobbs, made a gallant and, as it seemed, imprudent charge upon the pit or the right, but was repulsed when within about a hundred yards of the work. During this charge we took prisoner Major-General Walker, of South Carolina, who was here temporarily in command of a brigade. He had his foot torn off by a shell, and states that his brigade ran off and left him on the field. The firing being over for the present, our men could be seen huddled behind apple trees
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
strongly-fortified position on the Rapidan, thus forcing the rebels to give Grant battle, or press rapidly rearward to the walls of their capital. The first step toward organization was made some weeks since, by the concentration at Yorktown, from the various posts in the Department of North Carolina and Virginia, the great bulk of the Eighteenth Army Corps. To the command of these troops was assigned Major-General W. F. Smith. In addition to these war-worn heroes from the coast of North Carolina and the posts in Virginia, nearly all the brave and gallant fellows in the Tenth Army Corps (under Major-General Gillmore), were sent to General Butler, to participate in the movement, forming their encampment at Gloucester Point, opposite Yorktown. That Yorktown and Gloucester Point, both at the mouth of the York river, should have been selected for the rendezvous of these troops, naturally led to the supposition that the advance was intended to be made up the Peninsula by the route
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
ppomattox. No opposition experienced thus far. The movement was apparently a complete surprise. Both army corps left Yorktown during last night. The monitors are all over the bar at Harrison's Landing and above City Point. The operations of the to the walls of their capital. The first step toward organization was made some weeks since, by the concentration at Yorktown, from the various posts in the Department of North Carolina and Virginia, the great bulk of the Eighteenth Army Corps. re), were sent to General Butler, to participate in the movement, forming their encampment at Gloucester Point, opposite Yorktown. That Yorktown and Gloucester Point, both at the mouth of the York river, should have been selected for the rendezvouYorktown and Gloucester Point, both at the mouth of the York river, should have been selected for the rendezvous of these troops, naturally led to the supposition that the advance was intended to be made up the Peninsula by the route which proved so fearfully disastrous to McClellan. But this show of force was merely a stupendous ruse de guerre, and circumst
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
steamer Grayhound, off Fort Powhatan, James river, Va., Thursday, May 5, 1864. The movemenproject was to advance upon Richmond by the James river; get a foothold as near the city as possiblr commanded an advance of the troops up the James river, convoyed by three army gunboats, under Briaming by Newport News into the mouth of the James river. But the steamers of the Tenth (General Gih corps, held the extreme right, resting on James river, at Dr. Howlett's farm. General Weitzel he's staff, with a party of men, went over to James river where a rebel schooner lay, made a raft of ng of the campaign on the south side of the James river occurred yesterday. In the early morning, defence known as Bermuda Hundred, between the James and Appomattox rivers. Here the troops were s, and Terry's headquarters on the banks of the James are plainly visible. Our losses to-day cannhe point of land formed by the junction of the James and Appomattox rivers, so that the space now o
Kettle Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
on, Wistar's brigade, steadily pushed the enemy back. General Turner, by this time, was also in motion, and our whole line obtained an advanced position beyond Kettle run, and near Proctor's creek. The enemy had a battery in position on the pike, which annoyed our men considerably, and we were unable to obtain a position which cspect of turning the right of the enemy's position. After much necessary delay, and after several reconnoissances had been made, a crossing was discovered over Kettle run: also, a road through the swamp, and a fording-place on Proctor's creek; but darkness coming on, the move was deferred until the morning. The rain continued, al Gibbon's forces occupied the line between General Smith's left and General Ames' right, and to add to the force General Marston's brigade was ordered to cross Kettle run and Proctor's creek, and advance up the line of the railroad. General Turner had also been withdrawn from the right, as the bend in the river narrowed the line
Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
lant fellows in the Tenth Army Corps (under Major-General Gillmore), were sent to General Butler, to participate in the movement, forming their encampment at Gloucester Point, opposite Yorktown. That Yorktown and Gloucester Point, both at the mouth of the York river, should have been selected for the rendezvous of these troops,Gloucester Point, both at the mouth of the York river, should have been selected for the rendezvous of these troops, naturally led to the supposition that the advance was intended to be made up the Peninsula by the route which proved so fearfully disastrous to McClellan. But this show of force was merely a stupendous ruse de guerre, and circumstances indicate that it succeeded admirably in deceiving the rebels. Their journals have constantly of Sunday the 15th, the whole movement of this army, in all its parts and particulars, had been a complete success. The sudden departure of the troops from Gloucester Point and Fortress Monroe; their passage up the James; their landing at Bermuda Hundred; their advance to a position some six miles beyond that place, and intrench
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
Lieutenant-General Grant, the actual commander of the armies of the United States, visited Fortress Monroe, it was for the purpose of ascertaining the views of General Butler respecting an advance uis scheme of mystification, all the light-draft steamers were kept until the last moment at Fortress Monroe, whence, early yesterday morning, they were despatched to the York river, and the work of e But the steamers of the Tenth (General Gillmore's) corps were still quietly at anchor off Fortress Monroe. Here was an unexpected source of detention. General Butler had every reason to suppose t which General Butler, with his staff, had come at midnight, went back from Newport News to Fortress Monroe. General Gillmore was sent for, and made satisfactory explanations to General Butler. This had been a complete success. The sudden departure of the troops from Gloucester Point and Fortress Monroe; their passage up the James; their landing at Bermuda Hundred; their advance to a position
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
neral's staff also present, For my sake Major, don't tell the General about the torpedoes, for he will want to take the Grayhound and explore the river himself. Captain West of General Smith's staff, with a party of men, went over to James river where a rebel schooner lay, made a raft of logs, went off to the boat, and set her on fire. It was thought that a torpedo was attached to her, and she had been floated down and anchored at that point. In the fight of Monday last, the three Massachusetts regiments were encountered by General Hazard's brigade, of South Carolina, their regiments being the same numbers, Twenty-three, Twenty-five and Twenty-seven. They were badly whipped, and Captain Leroy Hammond, who was mortally wounded, told one of the surgeons, before his death, If we had known you were veterans we wouldn't have charged so. It was like retribution. Friday dawned with alternate cloud and sunshine. General Butler's staff were early in the saddle, and galloped to the
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 155
then the dashing horsemen will do other damage to the enemy's means of supply as far as they can find opportunity. General Kautz has received a roving commission, and if not too hardly pressed by the rebels, he may penetrate as far south as Weldon, N. C., returning when it suits his convenience. Starting up the Peninsula from Williamsburg, another cavalry force, somewhat smaller, commanded by Colonel West, also set out at daybreak. Their object was to create a diversion in our favor by keops had been thus fighting successfully with the rebels directly in front, General Kautz, with his cavalry, had executed a grand raid round to the south of Petersburg, playing the mischief with the railroads leading from that place to Suffolk and Weldon. Nor did our success stop there. On the morning of Thursday the twelfth, the army, after a rest of twenty-four hours, began another advance in full force ; General Kautz setting forth about the same time on another raid, to break up the railroa
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