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William A. Gregory (search for this): chapter 84
The enemy's lines were soon carried, with many prisoners, and all his artillery that were in his works. The scene was magnificent — the grandest I have beheld during the war. Most of the enemy in my front were captured, with three pieces of artillery. The enemy's trenches were strewn with arms, accoutrements, and camp equipage. The officers of the three front regiments, with many private soldiers, led the van, cheering onward, as did those who followed in the rear lines. Lamented Adjutant Gregory, Eighty-fourth Indiana, fell when within about one hundred yards of the enemy's works, from an artillery ball or shell, while pressing forward and encouraging his regiment. May kind remembrances follow him. My brigade moved forward of all other troops on the right of the Franklin pike, so that my skirmishers covered the mountain pass at Brentwood at nightfall, where we rested for the night. Early next morning the pursuit was continued — my brigade in front. Our forces continued to
prepared to move at six A. M. II. Brigadier-General Elliott, commanding Second division, will mothrough the lines, and form in echelon to General Elliott's left, slightly refusing his own left. maintain this position, and advance with General Elliott. IV. As soon as General Kimball's divoners. The Second division of the corps, General Elliott's, followed the movement of General Kimbanklin pike and move southward, parallel to it-Elliott's division leading, followed by Kimball's, thn eastward of the pike, retreated southward. Elliott's division was deployed across the road, faci Beatty's division was formed on the left of Elliott's, and Kimball's division massed near the pike, in rear of Elliott's. In this order the corps advanced nearly three-fourths of a mile, when it en. An effort was at once made to connect General Elliott's right with General Smith's left. The iision commanders, Brigadier-Generals Kimball, Elliott and Beatty, in the handling of their commands[1 more...]
m to the favorable consideration of my seniors in rank, and to the government. Major Goodspeed, Chief of Artillery, rendered the most valuable service on both the fifteenth and sixteenth. A battery was never required in any position that it was not promptly put there. The officers of all the batteries engaged behaved with great gallantry, as did their men. The artillery practice on both those days was splendid. Surgeon Heard, Medical Director; Surgeon Bromley, Medical Inspector; and Captain Towsley, Chief of Ambulances, performed their duties most satisfactorily. Ample preparations had been made in advance for the wounded, and humane and efficient care was promptly rendered them. Lieutenant-Colonel Hayes Chief Quartermaster, and Captain Hodgdon, Chief Commissary, performed the duties of their respective departments in a satisfactory manner. To the officers of every grade, and to the brave, but nameless men in the ranks, my grateful thanks for the cheerful, gallant, and effectiv
ed one of the most dreary, uncomfortable, and inclement days I remember to have passed in the course of nineteen years and a half of active field service. Late in the afternoon, some dismounted cavalry succeeded in crossing the creek on the ruins of the railroad bridge, and drove off the enemy from its southern bank. During the night and the early forenoon of the following day (the twentieth) two bridges for infantry were constructed across the stream, one at the turnpike crossing, by Colonel Opdycke's brigade of the Second division, and the other by General Grose's, of the First division. So soon as these were completed the infantry of the corps were passed over, marched three miles, and encamped for the night on the northern bank of Duck River. During the night of the twentieth the weather became bitterly cold. Wednesday, the twenty-first, operations were suspended, and the corps remained quietly in camp, as the pontoon train, detained by the swollen streams, the inclement we
David Watson (search for this): chapter 84
was bottomless when we passed over it. It was strewn with the wrecks of wagons, artillery carriages, and other material, abandoned by the enemy in his flight. The corps remained two days at Lexington, awaiting orders. On the thirtieth December, instructions were received to take post at this place. On the thirty-first, the corps marched to Elk River, a distance of fifteen miles. The river being too swollen to ford, two days were spent in bridging it. Colonel Suman, Ninth Indiana, and Major Watson, Seventy-fifth Illinois, using the pioneers of the corps as laborers and mechanics, built a substantial trestle-bridge three hundred and nine feet long, over which the corps, with its artillery and wagons, safely passed. Elk River was crossed on the third of January, and on the fifth the corps encamped in the vicinity of this place. Thus was closed, for the Fourth corps, one of the most remarkable campaigns of the war. The enemy, superior in numbers, had been driven by assault, in utt
tion, the evident steady resolve with which they had prepared for the assault, the cheerfulness with which they had received the announcement that they were les enfans perdu. So soon as I perceived the troops begin to retire, apprehending that the enemy might attempt an offensive return, I despatched an order to all the batteries bearing on the hill to open the heaviest possible fire so soon as their fronts were sufficiently cleared by the retiring troops to permit it. I also ordered Colonel Kuefter, commanding Third brigade, Third division, to hold his command well in hand, ready to charge the enemy, should he presume to follow our troops. Both orders were promptly obeyed, and if the enemy ever had the temerity to contemplate an offensive return, he never attempted to carry it into effect. Not a prisoner was captured from us — a fact almost unparalleled in an assault so fierce, so near to success, but unsuccessful. And no foot of ground previously won was lost. After the repul
John Bennett (search for this): chapter 84
ntwood at nightfall, where we rested for the night. Early next morning the pursuit was continued — my brigade in front. Our forces continued to press the enemy until his remainder, not killed, wounded, or captured, had crossed the Tennessee River, about one hundred and ten miles from Nashville. We pursued under bad weather, over bad roads, and with great fatigue and hard labor to the command, to Lexington, Alabama; from thence to this place (Huntsville). The regimental commanders, Colonel Bennett, Colonel Rose, Colonel Suman, Lieutenant-Colonel Morton, Major Taylor, Captain Lawton, and Captain Cunningham, with their officers and men, have my grateful thanks for their willing obedience to orders, their brave and efficient execution of every duty upon the battle-field and during the campaign. My command routed the enemy from his lines and positions, containing seven pieces of artillery: four on the first and three on the second days; capturing a large number of small arms, with
ers mention the services of the brigade commanders, and of the brigade staff officers. From the very best opportunity of observing, I can truly bear testimony, and I do it with the highest satisfaction, to the soldierly — in truth, splendid conduct of the whole corps in all the conflicts of the fifteenth and sixteenth; have never seen troops behave better on any battle-field. To the members of my staff, Lieutenant-Colonel Fullerton, Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff; Lieutenant-Colonel Greenwood. Assistant Inspector-General: Major Sinclair, Assistant Adjutant-General; Major Dawson, Fifteenth Ohio volunteers, Chief of Outposts and Pickets; First Lieutenant George Shaffer, Ninety-third Ohio volunteers, and First Lieutenant C. D. Hammer, One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio volunteers; Aides-de-Camp Captain Stansbury, Nineteenth regulars, Commissary of Musters; Captain Kaldenbaugh, Provost Marshal; and Lieutenant Kennedy, Acting Assistant Inspector, I owe many thanks for the z
James F. Kennedy (search for this): chapter 84
ton, Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff; Lieutenant-Colonel Greenwood. Assistant Inspector-General: Major Sinclair, Assistant Adjutant-General; Major Dawson, Fifteenth Ohio volunteers, Chief of Outposts and Pickets; First Lieutenant George Shaffer, Ninety-third Ohio volunteers, and First Lieutenant C. D. Hammer, One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio volunteers; Aides-de-Camp Captain Stansbury, Nineteenth regulars, Commissary of Musters; Captain Kaldenbaugh, Provost Marshal; and Lieutenant Kennedy, Acting Assistant Inspector, I owe many thanks for the zealous, intelligent and gallant manner in which they performed their duties, both on the field of battle and in the long and arduous pursuit. I commend them to the favorable consideration of my seniors in rank, and to the government. Major Goodspeed, Chief of Artillery, rendered the most valuable service on both the fifteenth and sixteenth. A battery was never required in any position that it was not promptly put there. The
Kaldenbaugh (search for this): chapter 84
rs of my staff, Lieutenant-Colonel Fullerton, Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff; Lieutenant-Colonel Greenwood. Assistant Inspector-General: Major Sinclair, Assistant Adjutant-General; Major Dawson, Fifteenth Ohio volunteers, Chief of Outposts and Pickets; First Lieutenant George Shaffer, Ninety-third Ohio volunteers, and First Lieutenant C. D. Hammer, One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio volunteers; Aides-de-Camp Captain Stansbury, Nineteenth regulars, Commissary of Musters; Captain Kaldenbaugh, Provost Marshal; and Lieutenant Kennedy, Acting Assistant Inspector, I owe many thanks for the zealous, intelligent and gallant manner in which they performed their duties, both on the field of battle and in the long and arduous pursuit. I commend them to the favorable consideration of my seniors in rank, and to the government. Major Goodspeed, Chief of Artillery, rendered the most valuable service on both the fifteenth and sixteenth. A battery was never required in any position
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