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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ole weight was on the side of Christ, who often sent for me to talk of plans for religious services, etc. He lived a monument of God's grace, and died rejoicing in the faith. This was an active campaign with us, but we kept up religious services as well as possible. All who were really pious before held their ground, but the chaff was sifted out. That winter we were in Caroline county-had no chapel, but had meetings occasionally—grew rather lukewarm. In next campaign was the memorable Pennsylvania disaster, and after our return to the Valley we set more regularly to work for Christ, and later in the season on this side of the mountains we held nightly meetings conducted by officers and men, which grew in interest till all became more or less under its influence, and many a one dates his conversion to that period. Those were happy times, and long to be remembered. Old Blue Run Church will not soon be forgotten. Some of those men you had the pleasure of immersing in Orange county.
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ad just before engaging, that many of the men drew forth their Testaments and enjoyed the consolations of the Gospel in view of their danger. And from their serious faces we could see they were in earnest and enjoyed the comforting assurances therein provided. The changed, sober countenances of the men on going into battle was very marked, and serious thoughts were occupying their minds. In winter of 1862 and 1863, after the first battle of Fredericksburg, we were engaged on picket at Port Royal, some fourteen miles below Fredericksburg, detached from the first regiment in which we had been formed, with several other companies, and we had no preaching throughout this winter, except once or twice by Rev. J. Wm. Jones, of Thirteenth Virginia, who was some three miles from us. Yet the Lord visited us in our prayer-meetings, which we held regularly, generally twice on the Sabbath and twice during the week, in some of the shanties we had erected. These meetings were very well attended
Pittsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
history of our regiment (and also one of our brigade) written, but have heard nothing of it since the close of the war. This regiment was composed of men from Pittsylvania, Halifax and Mecklenburg counties, Virginia. It started from Danville in the spring of 1861, under the command of Colonel E. C. Edmunds. It was connected witat he felt prepared. He was killed near Drewry's Bluff, May Io, 1864, leaving a young bride and many dear ones to mourn their loss. Colonel George Griggs, of Pittsylvania, was our next colonel. He was a member of the Baptist Church. He was ever ready to aid me in my meetings, and was not ashamed to exhort his men publicly to eir country. (6.) I don't remember but some four or five who told me that they would devote the rest of their time to the ministry. Captain J. A. Herndon, of Pittsylvania, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, expected to do so. Brother W. A. Morefield, of Halifax; Brother Hodges, Methodist Episcopal; Brother C. Penick, Episcopal C
Manning, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
; Billy, you must quit swearing; you are too good to go to hell; quit swearing, Billy. Then, after manifesting much outward affection towards his nurse, he released him, but continued for some time reaching towards heaven and clasping his hands and saying he saw Jesus, and in this happy frame he died. With many wishes for your success in your undertaking, I am, in Christ, yours, J. H. Colton. From Rev. James McDowell, Presbyterian, chaplain Palmetto Sharpshooters. Manning, South Carolina, March 27, 1867. Rev. J. Wm. Jones: Dear Brother: I was chaplain of the Palmetto Sharpshooters, Jenkins's Brigade; and after he was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, Bratton's Brigade, Longstreet's Corps. I became chaplain in July, 1862, and continued so until the surrender of the army at Appomattox Court House. I usually had the following services in my regiment: On Sabbath a prayermeeting about sunrise, preaching about 11 o'clock, and preaching or prayer-meeting in t
Gloucester Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ee things under circumstances to enable me to contribute to a history with the one exception of Wise's Brigade. Owing to my having a son in this brigade and to the fact of several companies from Bedford, then the county of my residence, being in it, I had more to do with it than any other body of our soldiery. Beside a number of other visits made to it, in Virginia and the South, I spent more than a week, including two Sabbaths, with the regiment, Fourth Heavy Artillery originally (at Gloucester Point) and afterwards Thirty-fourth Infantry, during the summer of 1863, while the brigade enjoyed its quiet time of several months at Chapin's Farm, below Richmond. I preached and held religious services during the time mentioned, which resulted in the hopeful conversion of some eight or ten. At least as many, I think, had been hopefully converted in those Bedford companies before my arrival, part of them in connection with public efforts of ministers in the other regiments and partly thr
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ment was composed of men from Pittsylvania, Halifax and Mecklenburg counties, Virginia. It started from Danville in the spring of 1861, under the command of Colonel E. C. Edmunds. It was connected with several brigades. When I joined it, it was attached to Armistead's Brigade, Pickett's Division, First Corps, and it continued in this position to the surrender, under different commanders. General Armistead was killed at Gettysburg. Our next general was Barton; then George H. Steuart, of Maryland, who remained with it till the surrender. I knew very little about the other regiments—viz., Ninth, Fourteenth, Fifty-third and Fifty-seventh. The Rev. Mr. Crocker, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was at one time chaplain of the Fourteenth; Rev. Mr. Joiner, Methodist Episcopal Church, chaplain of the Fifty-seventh; Rev. W. S. Penick of the Fifty-third, afterwards Brother P. H. Fontaine; Rev. J. W. Walkup, of Rockbridge county, Virginia, was chaplain of the Ninth, afterwards Rev. George
Halifax county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
y-eighth Virginia. Chesterfield, March 22, 1867. Dear Brother Jones: Before going into details, allow me to state that I was appointed chaplain of the Thirty-eighth Virginia Infantry June 9, 1863, and remained with it to the surrender. (1.) I know very little about the early history of my regiment. We had a history of our regiment (and also one of our brigade) written, but have heard nothing of it since the close of the war. This regiment was composed of men from Pittsylvania, Halifax and Mecklenburg counties, Virginia. It started from Danville in the spring of 1861, under the command of Colonel E. C. Edmunds. It was connected with several brigades. When I joined it, it was attached to Armistead's Brigade, Pickett's Division, First Corps, and it continued in this position to the surrender, under different commanders. General Armistead was killed at Gettysburg. Our next general was Barton; then George H. Steuart, of Maryland, who remained with it till the surrender.
Eatonton (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
halted at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, and yielded to overwhelming numbers and resources. Here I leave the field of blood (ever looking back upon many sacred spots where the Lord blessed us) with mingled grief and joy. I baptized while in the army 238 soldiers. Number professing conversion, 500. Preached about 500 sermons, besides exhortations, lectures, etc. Yours fraternally, John J. Hyman. From Rev. A. M. Marshall, Baptist, chaplain Twelfth Georgia Regiment. Eatonton, Georgia, March 22, 1867. Dear Brother Jones: I was, as you know, chaplain Twelfth Georgia Regiment, Doles's Brigade, but did not get my appointment until just before the battle of Sharpsburg. As soon as the army crossed back on the Virginia side, I commenced a meeting in the regiment, which increased in interest until several regiments and battalions became interested. I called to my assistance Dr. Stiles, Brother Nelson and yourself. The meeting was one of great interest, and promised
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
upon the whole, though there were a great many very wicked men, that still religion exerted a considerable power on the general morals and efficiency of the army. I think there were several men in the brigade, who were killed, who thought of devoting themselves to the ministry; but none that I know of who survived the war, and none at any time in my regiment. Perhaps some of the following incidents may be of some service to you: I asked a young man of my regiment, wounded near Lookout Mountain, who afterwards died: What would you take for your hope that you are a Christian? He answered: Not ten thousand worlds. A lieutenant in the same hospital, wounded same time, who died after the amputation of a leg, said, in answer to my inquiry as to the cause of his not being a Christian: I have often wanted to be a Christian, but I put it off from day to day. Another lieutenant of my regiment, wounded at Spottsylvania, who also died, said: I had fixed as a time to attend to my s
Kosciusko, Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ld him that he was mortally wounded. He said: I am no more afraid to die than I am to fight for my country. Lieutenant-Colonel Hardeman, Major Carson and Dr. Etheridge, were all professors of religion, and were always ready to do all they could for the cause of Christ. There were several captains and subordinate officers of whom I would like to speak if I had time. I am yours, etc., A. M. Marshall. From Rev. C. H. Dobbs, Presbyterian, chaplain Twelfth Mississippi. Kosciusko, Mississippi, March, 1867. Dear Brother: I regret exceedingly that about the close of the war I lost nearly every vestige of information concerning the data you desire, as far as papers, manuscripts, etc. are concerned, hence the impossibility of giving you much in the way of statistics. You can, perhaps, obtain from Mrs. Brown, of Richmond, Virginia, a copy of the by-laws, etc., of the Christian Association in Harris's Brigade, from which you can find the number of church-members, conversio
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