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Scottsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
nce to his son, who had recently entered the service, and spoke of the solicitude his wife felt, and of some of the efforts she had made in his behalf. Rev. J. B. Jeter publicly thanked Brother Clopton for his speech, and remarked that he had promised the superintendent of colportage a tract, and that Brother Clopton had furnished him with a theme, A mother's parting words to her soldier boy. And in a few days the tract was written and printed. A. E. D. Elder J. A. Doll writes: Scottsville, October 2. We have a gracious revival here, going on among the soldiers and citizens. One service is held during the day in one of our hospitals, and another at night in the church. A goodly number of soldiers and citizens have already professed conversion, and the prospect is cheering. A private letter from a soldier who was in the Maryland campaign, published in the South-western Baptist, says: I had my Bible in my right breast-pocket, and a ball struck it and bounced back.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 5
e Divine word. We say partially, for often the distribution would be limited to a single copy of the Bible or Testament for a mess of five or six men. The visit of Rev. Dr. Moses D. Hoge, of Richmond, to England was not only very useful in securing the large donations of Bibles and Testaments noted above, but his eloquent statement of the religious work in the Confederate armies, in which he was so able and efficient a helper, elicited the sympathies and prayers of many Christians in Great Britain. He brought over also many very valuable books and tracts, some of which were republished for use in our armies. One of my most cherished mementos of the war is a portable Bible, commentary and concordance, which were brought over by Dr. Hoge, and copies of which were presented to many of the chaplains by that accomplished Christian woman and noble worker, Mrs. E. H. Brown (of the Central Presbyterian), who was appropriately called The chaplains' friend, and whose untiring labors i
Thorn Spring (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
must do to be saved. He requested me to visit him, and aid him in securing life everlasting. February 17, 1863. After getting my tracts, hymn-books, etc., I supplied the Sixty-third, Fifty-first and Fifty-eighth Regiments, and also Derrick's and Clarke's Battalions and Brian's Battery. The brave men received the tracts eagerly and thankfully, and were always pleased with an appointment for preaching or prayer. We held meetings in Monroe, and at the narrows of New river, and at Thorn Spring, near Dublin, where four artillery companies are now in camp. Never have I met with more patient and attentive audiences. One and another would inquire for Testaments, and express a resolution to lead a new life. With the batteries we held repeated meetings, and there is evidently an increasing interest in religion. Wherever I have gone among our troops, I have found a cheering proportion of pious men—soldiers of Christ. I have found young brethren who stand firm in their Christian i
Culpeper (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
of John. He said, I have but one more step to take, and I shall be over the Jordan of death, and soon, in perfect peace, he passed away. I commit all into the hands of my Father in Heaven, and go forth to tell of Jesus' dying love. We must return to God and restore that of which we are robbing Him, if we would be blessed. Say to our Congress, restore to God His Sabbath by stopping the transportation and opening of the mails on the day of the Lord. Rev. A. M. Grimsley writes, from Culpeper county: God is blessing us up here. Many of our brave boys have professed conversion. God grant that the work may spread. Rev. C. F. Fry: The past month I have spent in Winchester, Woodstock, and Staunton. Several have expressed themselves as being anxiously concerned about the great salvation. It was, of course, a delightful work to point them to the sinner's Friend. I also found many truly devoted Christians, who seemed rejoiced to have a colporter come among them. They are eager to
Lewisburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
nearly all the Testaments, etc., we had, and have not since been able to secure anything to read except fifteen small volumes presented to us by Kingston Baptist Church. Our regiment is now in four different directions, hence the chaplain cannot be with them all. Before we left North Carolina there were 137 in the regiment penitently inquiring after the Saviour. Rev. W. G. Margrave: Besides laboring here and there in the camps and hospitals, I have paid special attention to the sick in Lewisburg. Just before I left home, I visited a sick soldier and read to him the fourteenth chapter of the Gospel of John. He said, I have but one more step to take, and I shall be over the Jordan of death, and soon, in perfect peace, he passed away. I commit all into the hands of my Father in Heaven, and go forth to tell of Jesus' dying love. We must return to God and restore that of which we are robbing Him, if we would be blessed. Say to our Congress, restore to God His Sabbath by stopping t
Monroe, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ians, said another, and I too wish to learn what I must do to be saved. He requested me to visit him, and aid him in securing life everlasting. February 17, 1863. After getting my tracts, hymn-books, etc., I supplied the Sixty-third, Fifty-first and Fifty-eighth Regiments, and also Derrick's and Clarke's Battalions and Brian's Battery. The brave men received the tracts eagerly and thankfully, and were always pleased with an appointment for preaching or prayer. We held meetings in Monroe, and at the narrows of New river, and at Thorn Spring, near Dublin, where four artillery companies are now in camp. Never have I met with more patient and attentive audiences. One and another would inquire for Testaments, and express a resolution to lead a new life. With the batteries we held repeated meetings, and there is evidently an increasing interest in religion. Wherever I have gone among our troops, I have found a cheering proportion of pious men—soldiers of Christ. I have found
Kanawha (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
sh to learn what I must do to be saved. He requested me to visit him, and aid him in securing life everlasting. February 17, 1863. After getting my tracts, hymn-books, etc., I supplied the Sixty-third, Fifty-first and Fifty-eighth Regiments, and also Derrick's and Clarke's Battalions and Brian's Battery. The brave men received the tracts eagerly and thankfully, and were always pleased with an appointment for preaching or prayer. We held meetings in Monroe, and at the narrows of New river, and at Thorn Spring, near Dublin, where four artillery companies are now in camp. Never have I met with more patient and attentive audiences. One and another would inquire for Testaments, and express a resolution to lead a new life. With the batteries we held repeated meetings, and there is evidently an increasing interest in religion. Wherever I have gone among our troops, I have found a cheering proportion of pious men—soldiers of Christ. I have found young brethren who stand firm
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
e and tract work in connection with societies whose headquarters were in Northern cities, and our facilities for publishing were very scant. The great societies at the North generally declared Bibles and Testaments contraband of war, and we had at once to face the problem of securing supplies through the blockade, or manufacturing them with our poor facilities. The first Confederate Bible printed, so far as I can ascertain, was from the presses of the South-western Publishing House, at Nashville, 1861. A copy of this edition was sent to President Davis, who replied: The Bible is a beautiful specimen of Southern workmanship, and if I live to be inaugurated the first President of the Confederacy, on the 22d of February, my lips shall press the sacred volume which your kindness has bestowed upon me. The British and Foreign Bible Society gave to the Confederate Bible Society unlimited credit in the purchase of supplies, and made liberal donations of Bibles and Testaments for our s
Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
e hospitals of this city, and others are being brought here from more exposed points. It is the purpose of the authorities to establish hospitals at Liberty and Farmville. Several hundred sick soldiers are already in these two towns. The hospitals afford a most inviting field for religious effort. The solemn quiet and the seriok God, to-morrow I leave for Georgia to meet my wife and children, to tell them what great things the Lord hath done for me. Brother McVeigh, post chaplain at Farmville, writes me that a good work is going on in the hospitals in that town, and several have obtained a good hope through Christ. For two months there has been unuserested. It is an interesting sight to see men, wounded in every variety of way, sitting attentive to the story of the Cross. Rev. T. J. McVeigh, chaplain at Farmville: My supply of tracts has been distributed, and the soldiers ask for more. I administered the ordinance of baptism (for the first time) a few Sabbaths since, in
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
t should be paid upon the debt until it was liquidated. We could not, for a moment, entertain such a proposition. We are only too thankful that God has in his Providence put in our hands the means of supplying your wants. Into the political question which now agitates the States of America it is not our province to enter. We hroach to any people. It is vain to speak of the justice of our cause, unless we seek upon that cause the blessing of heaven, and use the instrumentality which Providence places in our hands. The speaker believed that piety will make a man a truer patriot and a braver soldier. It assures him that God is his friend; that all thi of its issues. We give their names: The Evils of Gaming; a Letter to a Friend in the Army, by Rev. J. B. Jeter, D. D.— Swearing, by Hon. J. L. M. Curry— God's Providence, a Source of Comfort and Courage to Christians, by Rev. A. M. Poindexter, D. D.— For the Confederate army, by Hon. M. J. Wellborn.— David, by Professor Geo. E.
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