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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865. Search the whole document.

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Benjamin E. Morgan (search for this): chapter 8
ths; another to attend to the hauling, while a third would put them in place and cover with brush and dirt. Wagon trains, constantly passing to the front and returning, made things lively all the time, and once in a while enabled the men to vary their work by helping to get a mule out of the mud. So the siege went on. Day by day, the pick, the spade and the rifle were in active use. The exhausting labor in the trenches bore down its hundreds, while the bullets lay low a dozen. Private Benjamin E. Morgan, of Company A, was wounded by the bursting of a shell while on picket, April 24. The position of the camp was changed several times before the evacuation. These camps were anything but comfortable. The land was low and flat, water could be found almost anywhere at a foot below the surface. Natural springs were seldom found and the water was muddy and impure. Everything was filthy, and the frequent rains, followed by a broiling sun, caused much sickness. It was not an uncomm
Patrick Murphy (search for this): chapter 8
sket from their men and peppered away at the enemy until ordered by a staff officer to desist. After gaining the requisite knowledge of the locality by thus drawing the enemy's fire, the regiment was halted where it was partially sheltered in a ravine and remained there two hours, subjected to a vigorous fire from the guns of the works. At nightfall they were withdrawn. The officers and men behaved admirably and called forth General Dana's hearty commendation. Captain Wass and Privates Patrick Murphy and David Duran of Company K were wounded, and Private Andrew Fontain, of Company D, was killed,—being the first man in the regiment to be killed. During the reconnoisance a drizzling rain had prevailed and everything and everybody was thoroughly soaked. At night the men were stationed in an old cornfield with one foot on one hill and another on the other, with several inches of water between them. In this position, steaded by their muskets, many of them stood up all night. Th
Andrew Fontain (search for this): chapter 8
staff officer to desist. After gaining the requisite knowledge of the locality by thus drawing the enemy's fire, the regiment was halted where it was partially sheltered in a ravine and remained there two hours, subjected to a vigorous fire from the guns of the works. At nightfall they were withdrawn. The officers and men behaved admirably and called forth General Dana's hearty commendation. Captain Wass and Privates Patrick Murphy and David Duran of Company K were wounded, and Private Andrew Fontain, of Company D, was killed,—being the first man in the regiment to be killed. During the reconnoisance a drizzling rain had prevailed and everything and everybody was thoroughly soaked. At night the men were stationed in an old cornfield with one foot on one hill and another on the other, with several inches of water between them. In this position, steaded by their muskets, many of them stood up all night. The officers were huddled together into a half dozen Sibley tents hastily
David Duran (search for this): chapter 8
d peppered away at the enemy until ordered by a staff officer to desist. After gaining the requisite knowledge of the locality by thus drawing the enemy's fire, the regiment was halted where it was partially sheltered in a ravine and remained there two hours, subjected to a vigorous fire from the guns of the works. At nightfall they were withdrawn. The officers and men behaved admirably and called forth General Dana's hearty commendation. Captain Wass and Privates Patrick Murphy and David Duran of Company K were wounded, and Private Andrew Fontain, of Company D, was killed,—being the first man in the regiment to be killed. During the reconnoisance a drizzling rain had prevailed and everything and everybody was thoroughly soaked. At night the men were stationed in an old cornfield with one foot on one hill and another on the other, with several inches of water between them. In this position, steaded by their muskets, many of them stood up all night. The officers were huddle
G. B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 8
ege of Yorktown. On Monday, March 24, the regiment left Boliver Heights at 7.30 A. M. for Harper's Ferry to join General McClellan's army, en route for the Peninsula. After two hours of tedious waiting at the Ferry, they crossed the river on sin each branch complete in itself. There were on the ground, with the army, 126 regiments, batteries and cavalry. General McClellan arrived on April 3, and the order was given for the main body of the army to be ready the next morning for the advaed by their terrified inhabitants. A rain storm of several hour's duration compelled a halt and during that time Generals McClellan and Heintzelman passed the column on horseback. The cheering grew gradually and constantly louder as they approache Yorktown, on the eastern side of the York River, where the banks of that stream approach and form a narrow strait. McClellan reported that the position of the enemy is a strong one. From present indications their fortifications extend some two
Harry Hale (search for this): chapter 8
ushes, with here and there a tall pine. Through this swamp the men were stationed in couples and relieved each other at regular intervals. Generally one would be on duty and one would sleep until midnight, when they would change places. Capt. Harry Hale, during the siege of Yorktown, had a colored servant who bore the familiar name of George Washington. For the captain's dinner, one day, this darkey brought out a can of salmon and, thinking to warm it, put it over the fire. The fire did nand started to blow it. There was an explosion, and in an instant the darkey appeared before his astonished captain, his face and head covered with a pinkish substance which had gone into his ears, eyes and mouth and was stringing off from his kinky wool. Captain Hale thought at first that the poor darkey's head had been hurt by a shell and that it was brains that he saw all over it, but he soon learned that the can of salmon had exploded and scattered its contents over the frightened servant.
Ansel D. Wass (search for this): chapter 8
re from the guns of the works. At nightfall they were withdrawn. The officers and men behaved admirably and called forth General Dana's hearty commendation. Captain Wass and Privates Patrick Murphy and David Duran of Company K were wounded, and Private Andrew Fontain, of Company D, was killed,—being the first man in the regimenrder and moved by the flank into the woods in the direction of the enemy's works. After marching a mile or so, it halted in the edge of some woods. The right [Capt. Wass,] and left [Capt. Rice,] flank companies of the regiment were deployed as skirmishers. After the two companies had got their distance ahead, the rest of the ree skirmishers made a right half wheel and almost immediately came into collision with the rebel pickets. A lively encounter took place between them, in which Captain Wass, of Company K had his shoulder strap shot off and one of his men was wounded in the arm, when the rest of the regiment moved forward and the rebels retreated t
Alvin Sibley (search for this): chapter 8
of the Second Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. E. V. Sumner. The two other Brigades of the Division were commanded by Brig. Gen. Gorman and Brig. Gen. Burns. Camp was pitched here as though a long stay was to be made, the men being quartered in Sibley tents, it being the first time they had been thus housed. Thereafter, only shelter tents were used. Each man carried his part of it. Five pieces would make a tent, four for the roof and one for the end, and each tent sheltered five men. Sometimin an old cornfield with one foot on one hill and another on the other, with several inches of water between them. In this position, steaded by their muskets, many of them stood up all night. The officers were huddled together into a half dozen Sibley tents hastily put up. The ground was so wet that it was impossible to keep dry and the water ran in sheets under and through these tents. On the following day the army moved forward to the close investment of the enemy's works. General Sumner
N. J. T. Dana (search for this): chapter 8
ractical formation of the Army of the Potomac took place there. The Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment was made a part of the First Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. N. J. T. Dana; of the Second Division, commanded by Brig. Gen. John Sedgwick; of the Second Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. E. V. Sumner. The two other Brigades of the to the men and the company cooks were ordered to the ranks. On the 7th of April, the Nineteenth and Twentieth Massachusetts regiments, under the command of General Dana, started on a reconnoissance of the enemy's works. After discovering the fortifications at Winn's Mills, the Nineteenth was ordered to march through a belt oftwo hours, subjected to a vigorous fire from the guns of the works. At nightfall they were withdrawn. The officers and men behaved admirably and called forth General Dana's hearty commendation. Captain Wass and Privates Patrick Murphy and David Duran of Company K were wounded, and Private Andrew Fontain, of Company D, was kille
Edward W. Morrill (search for this): chapter 8
ine of march. Each soldier carried his piece of shelter tent. Six wagons only were allowed each regiment for officers' tents, baggage and the hospital and commissary stores. As the column took up its line of march, the cavalry and sharpshooters were sent in advance, to reconnoitre and to remove any obstructions of felled trees or broken bridges by which the enemy might have endeavored to retard their progress. The main body of the troops advanced by the direct route to Yorktown. General Morrill's Brigade and General Hamilton's Division of the Third Corps took a road which led to the right. The route traversed by both wings of the army led through the old fortifications of Big Bethel and over a fertile and very beautiful region, shaded with forests and embellished with the mansions of the wealthy planters. It was formerly the garden spot of Virginia, but the war had already spread its desolation over the once fair fields and they were now perfectly devastated. The farms were
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