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Hazel River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ing when the attack was ordered to be begun, General Warren who was to begin it, hesitated, and waited for further instructions from General Meade, who revoked the order for the assault and directed the return of the army to its former camp on Hazel River. The position occupied by the Second Brigade was a very pleasant one and the winter was passed without further effort to attack or repel attack. The Mine Run campaign though it did not result in the expected heavy fighting was not withoutgiments to the Sixth Corps. The conditions of life in a winter camp are so well described by Comrade Beckwith that his description ought to appear in the history of the regiment. He says, We passed the winter of 1863 and 1864 in camp near Hazel River. We picketed out toward White Sulphur Springs, and our pickets connected with the cavalry pickets a line of which extended for many miles to our right and rear, covering the railroad which was our source of supply. Soon after our return from
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Sixth Corps over the bridge at Rappahannock Station and it advanced toward Brandy Station in line of battle. This was the most spectacular movement the writer saw dhe charges of a like force of Rebel cavalry, but constantly advancing until Brandy Station was reached. The writer followed closely after the cavalry, and was equall of cavalry, to find the brigade gone, and he alone of the foot soldiery at Brandy Station. The return to Rappahannock Station that he made was much more rapid than d success. The next day when the corps crossed the river and advanced to Brandy Station the opposing army had withdrawn behind the Rapidan, leaving its partially bd beeves not yet cut up. The estate upon which the 1st Division encamped at Brandy Station belonged to John Minor Botts, one of the rare Union men of the south. One approach, and had to be called off with stern reproof. The encampment at Brandy Station was maintained only long enough to repair the railroad back to Centerville
Mine Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
k Station Adjt. Gen. R. P. Wilson the importance of the victory Mine Run General Bartlett visits the regiment his speech life in winter e, he might attack and defeat the division that was encamped along Mine Run. In this movement the 3d Corps, commanded by General French, moveabled General Lee to concentrate his forces behind the defenses of Mine Run, and greatly strengthen them. It was after sunset of the next daymanufacture. We heard that General French had advanced, and found Mine Run too deep to ford, and that he had given up the attempt, and we wenilroad which was our source of supply. Soon after our return from Mine Run, we got nicely and comfortably fixed in camp, and whenever the weaand the Rapidan, and flows into the Rapidan about half way between Mine Run and the junction of the two rivers. General Meade retired from MiMine Run across the Rapidan, and established winter quarters in the angle made by the rivers, the Sixth Corps being located along Hazel Run. He
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
junction of the two rivers. General Meade retired from Mine Run across the Rapidan, and established winter quarters in the angle made by the rivers, the Sixth Corps being located along Hazel Run. He might easily have retired down the left bank of the Rapidan and occupied the heights behind Fredericksburg, but that movement was forbidden by orders from Washington. On the 27th of February the Sixth Corps was ordered to support Custer's cavalry on a reconnaissance in the direction of Charlottesville. A disagreeable storm made the expedition a very trying one and the four days absence from camp made the return to its comforts very enjoyable. But who of that weary muddy company will ever forget the sight of the innumerable mass of crows that had taken possession of the camp, and were literally covering the ground, in spite of the guard left to protect it from marauders! It was at this camp too that Chaplain Adams of the Fifth Maine became a familiar figure to the members of the
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
arge in his front was a smart fellow and fooled them. They thought there was a column in mass moving on them, as they had seen a great body of troops formed and moving on them before dusk. Some years ago the writer visited the flag room in the capitol in Albany and heard a like story from an officer of one of the Louisiana regiments. He was visiting the capitol on some official business and, having some time to wait, fell into conversation with the curator of the flag room, who was one of Upcapitol on some official business and, having some time to wait, fell into conversation with the curator of the flag room, who was one of Upton's men in the battle. The officer told him that they were utterly discouraged by Upton's speech, and believing it was true, surrendered without much resistance. One of the 16th men told the writer of his experience in this action. He was a skirmisher and as he leaped upon the embankment of the pit one of the Rebels fired at him, exclaiming, I got you, but missed, and the next moment was impaled by the bayonet of the intended victim. A second feature of the battle that deserves notic
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
nd plunging down to the bottom was badly injured. The arrival of the Army of the Potomac at Centerville, before it was seized by the Confederates, was the second victory of Meade over Lee in the strategic game. Lee withdrew and on the 19th of October Meade began again to follow him, moving out toward Thoroughfare Gap, New Baltimore and Warrenton, which was reached on the 22d, and a halt of over two weeks was made. Camp was broken on the 7th of November, and an advance made to the Rappahannock River, where Lee was found occupying a strong position along the south side of the river and with a considerable force on the north bank, at Rappahannock Station. The Sixth Corps arrived opposite the position at the station, and found the enemy stationed as follows: A strong redoubt on the bluff, at the point where the railroad had crossed the river on a high bridge, was occupied by a battery and a full complement of soldiers for a garrison, a line of rifle pits extending up the river un
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
otomac and Washington by crossing at Germania Ford and pushing on rapidly to Centerville, the key to the old Bull Run battleground. To counteract this movement Meght flank of the Union army in an attempt to thus gain the vantage point at Centerville. Meade crossed the Sixth Corps over the bridge at Rappahannock Station and Meade had divined the purpose of General Lee and began a rapid race back to Centerville along the line of the railroad. The infantry used the railroad track as a r and Bull Run, and the head of the army filed into the old fortifications of Centerville just before the advance of the old corps of Stonewall Jackson came in sight o the bottom was badly injured. The arrival of the Army of the Potomac at Centerville, before it was seized by the Confederates, was the second victory of Meade randy Station was maintained only long enough to repair the railroad back to Centerville and bring up needed supplies, when another advance began. General Lee had d
Snickersville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
or duty, with Major Mather in command, took up the line of march through Boonsborough, Middletown and Burkettsville to the old crossing of the Potomac, at Berlin. Lieut.-Col. Olcott, Captain Gordon and Lieut. Bates were left behind sick. Captain Galpin and Lieutenants Paine and VanScoy with an escort of men, were sent to Washington to bring a squad of conscripts to the regiment. Having crossed the river at Berlin on a pontoon bridge, the advance continued past Lovettsville, Uniontown, Snickersville, and on the 23d of July Ashby's Gap was reached. The movement was continued through New Baltimore to Warrenton where a rest of a couple of days was enjoyed. Then the Second Brigade was sent back to New Baltimore five miles distant from the rest of the corps where it remained for some time. Its location rendered picketing necessary on all sides of the camp, as Moseby with his guerrillas was known to be in the vicinity. An attack was made which Comrade Beckwith graphically describes.
John Minor Botts (search for this): chapter 10
it. In this third event in the game of strategy General Meade certainly gained a decided success. The next day when the corps crossed the river and advanced to Brandy Station the opposing army had withdrawn behind the Rapidan, leaving its partially built winter quarters in our hands. The haste with which they had left their position was indicated by the finding of freshly killed beeves not yet cut up. The estate upon which the 1st Division encamped at Brandy Station belonged to John Minor Botts, one of the rare Union men of the south. One day he approached the headquarters of the 2d Brigade, but being clad in citizen's clothes, Captain Wilson's dog refused to let him approach, and had to be called off with stern reproof. The encampment at Brandy Station was maintained only long enough to repair the railroad back to Centerville and bring up needed supplies, when another advance began. General Lee had distributed his army south of the Rapidan River, in positions favorable f
m, and then fired and hit Jack. But the ball, striking something in Jack's pocket, glanced off. The Rebel shouted, I surrender, but Jack shot and wounded him badly. He said that he belonged to the 6th Louisiana, Hays' brigade, Early's Division, Ewell's Corps, and his name was Slidell. The artillery in the fort was now firing rapidly and the cannon shots flew over us and went after our fellows who were coming up behind. The Reb skirmishers kept falling back, but kept up a sharp fire. We cont to attack or repel attack. The Mine Run campaign though it did not result in the expected heavy fighting was not without incidents of great interest to the members of the 121st. When the Third Corps unexpectedly encountered a portion of General Ewell's corps and a lively little battle ensued, the First Division of the Sixth Corps was sent to the support of the troops engaged, and the Second Brigade, leading the Division and moving up to the position designated, was waiting for further ord
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