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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune. Search the whole document.

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America (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
t wave of humanity, of benevolence, of desire for improvement — a great wave of social sentiment, in short-poured itself among all who had the faculty of large and disinterested thinking ; a day when Pusey and Thomas Arnold, Carlyle and Dickens, Cobden and O'Connell, were arousing new interest in old subjects; when the communistic experiments in Brazil and Owen's project at Hopedale inspired expectation of social improvement; when Southey and Coleridge meditated a migration to the shores of America to assist in the foundation of an ideal society, and when philosophers on the continent of Europe were believing that things dreamed of were at last to be realized. Greeley's mind was naturally receptive of new plans for reform — a tendency inherited, perhaps, from his New England place of birth, that land in which every ism of social or religious life has had its origin. The hard experience of his own family, as he shared it in his early boyhood, led him to think that something was wrong
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
from Albany should be made at noon, and New York city be reached not later than 10 P. M. The trip was finished at 9 P. M., a speed of a little less than eighteen miles an hour if the first rider did not start ahead of time-a point about which the Tribune in its boasting of the feat the next morning could not be certain. A rider charged with the duty of bringing in the returns of a Connecticut election left New Haven, in a sulky, at 9.35 p. M., on the arrival of the express locomotive from Hartford, reached Stamford in three hours; there encountered a snow-storm and darkness so intense that he ran into another conveyance near New Rochelle and broke a wheel; took the harness from his horse and pressed on on horseback, arriving at the office at five o'clock the next morning. The most energetic reporter of to-day could not exceed this rider in enterprise and persistency. The ocean steamers of those days were not greyhounds, and so great was the competition for the earliest foreign ne
East River (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
d how she could do it, and it was at Mrs. Greeley's invitation that Margaret became a member of the Greeley household when she went to New York. Until the latter part of the year 1844 the Greeleys had lived within less than half a mile of the Tribune office, one experiment in Broome Street convincing the editor that that location was too far from his work. After his exertions in the great Clay campaign of 1844 the family took an old wooden house, surrounded by eight acres of land, on the East River, at Turtle Bay, nearly opposite Blackwell's Island. Margaret Fuller described it as two miles or more from the thickly settled part of New York, but omnibuses and cars give me constant access to the city. She did not complain of her accommodations there, but Greeley suggests that, in her physical condition, a better furnished room and a more liberal table would have added to her happiness. Greeley did not grant a ready acceptance to all of Miss Fuller's views. She wrote a great deal
Blackwell's Island (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ey's invitation that Margaret became a member of the Greeley household when she went to New York. Until the latter part of the year 1844 the Greeleys had lived within less than half a mile of the Tribune office, one experiment in Broome Street convincing the editor that that location was too far from his work. After his exertions in the great Clay campaign of 1844 the family took an old wooden house, surrounded by eight acres of land, on the East River, at Turtle Bay, nearly opposite Blackwell's Island. Margaret Fuller described it as two miles or more from the thickly settled part of New York, but omnibuses and cars give me constant access to the city. She did not complain of her accommodations there, but Greeley suggests that, in her physical condition, a better furnished room and a more liberal table would have added to her happiness. Greeley did not grant a ready acceptance to all of Miss Fuller's views. She wrote a great deal for the Tribune, however, on social questions,
Sylvania (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
and every means of a superior education of their children. The Brook farm experiment, which was later placed on a Fourier basis, was initiated in 1841, and the Sylvania enterprise, in Pike County, Pennsylvania, in 1843. The plant of the North Amercian Phalanx was established near Red Bank, N. J. Only one-quarter of the capita time residents of the Phalanstery, and Margaret Fuller, Frederica Bremmer, and Rev. W. H. Channing were among its visitors; but the Phalanx, like Brook farm and Sylvania, was not a permanent success. Sylvania passed into the hands of the mortgagee in two years, and, after a disastrous fire, with some other setbacks, the propertySylvania passed into the hands of the mortgagee in two years, and, after a disastrous fire, with some other setbacks, the property of the Phalanx was sold, its debts were paid, and the stockholders received a dividend equal to about 65 per cent of their investment. The Tribune and its editor incurred a great deal of criticism, and the paper lost some readers, because of Greeley's espousal of the socialist doctrines, but he refused to disassociate himself
Chappaqua (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
y so satirized as in that of a farmer, professing to give instruction on a subject about which he had no practical knowledge, and his agricultural experiment at Chappaqua received a vast amount of attention from pen and pencil. But such sneers were far astray. Greeley's ideas on farming were not quixotic; they were good, and they were founded on the advice of the best authorities of the day. The Chappaqua estate was ridiculed on the assumption that it did not pay. Most of the gentlemen farmers of this country would have to confess to a similar failure of their experiments if judged by their account books. Chappaqua, too, was not selected by Greeley, butChappaqua, too, was not selected by Greeley, but by his wife, or rather to meet three conditions on which she insisted-viz., a spring of pure water, a cascade or brawling brook, and a tract of evergreen woods, and, to be accessible to the busy editor, the site must be near the city. The best he could do, in satisfying these conditions, was to accept with them a rocky, wooded hi
Halifax (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
at five o'clock the next morning. The most energetic reporter of to-day could not exceed this rider in enterprise and persistency. The ocean steamers of those days were not greyhounds, and so great was the competition for the earliest foreign news that enterprising newspapers did not wait for the arrival of the mails by water at the nearest home port. On one occasion, when news of special importance was awaited, the Tribune engaged an express rider to meet the steamer (for Boston) at Halifax, and convey the news package with all speed across Nova Scotia to the Bay of Fundy, where a fast steamboat was to meet him and carry him to Portland, Me., whence a special locomotive would take him to Boston, from which point his budget would be hastened on to New York by rail and on horseback. Modern enterprise can not hope to excel this scheme, and we can sympathize with the editor in its failure to save him from being beaten. The rider made his way across Nova Scotia through drifts so
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ied without a hand in doing it. For some days members simply discussed the matter with one another or with their critic. Him they could not bend. On December 27 the subject was brought to the attention of the House by an Ohio member named Sawyer, who had been previously held up to ridicule by a Tribune correspondent for eating his luncheon during the session behind the Speaker's chair, and who, in the table, was credited with receiving $281 more than was his honest due. Mr. Turner, of Illinois, whose excess of mileage was nearly $200, moved the appointment of a committee to inquire whether the Tribune's charges did not amount to an allegation of fraud against the members, and to report whether they were false or true. Turner charged the editor-member-whom he alluded to as perhaps the gentleman, or rather the individual, perhaps the thing --with seeking notoriety, and being engaged in a very small business. Greeley took part in the ensuing debate, holding tenaciously to the main
France (France) (search for this): chapter 6
a series of articles on What shall be done for the Laborer, in which it held to the principle that the basis of all social and moral reform lay in a practical recognition of the Right of every human being to demand of the community an opportunity to labor and to receive a decent subsistence as the just reward of such labor. Greeley's sympathies were therefore ready to interest him in Albert Brisbane, a convert to Fourier's teaching, who had made the acquaintance of the French philosopher in France, and his friends, from his conversation, soon found that he had accepted Fourier's views. Brisbane edited a magazine called The Future, which was printed in Greeley's office, and whose prospectus said: The primary, positive, and definite object of its labors will be to show that Human Happiness may be promoted, knowledge and virtue increased, vice, misery, waste, and want infinitely diminished, by a reorganization of society upon the principle of Association, or a combination of effort, in
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Irish cause in 1848, and of the cause of Hungary, in whose behalf it proposed the raising of a patriotic loan, in shares of $100; its championship of cooperation in labor; its gradual approach to the radical view of temperance legislation represented by the Maine law, and its opposition to capital punishment, to more liberal divorce laws, and to flogging in the navy. It is true that its espousal of many causes raised up a host of enemies for the Tribune, and no other newspaper in the United States was looked on as so dangerous by those who did not agree with it. Nevertheless, the champion whose sword was naked for an attack on any worthy foe was an intellectual hero in thousands of eyes, and when Raymond started the Times in 1852 to supply a journal of political views similar to those advocated by the Tribune without the Tribune's vagaries, the new enterprise succeeded, but it made no serious inroads on the circulation of the older one. Greeley complained that the Times's circu
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