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Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
t spot, to prevent them from perishing. Returning to Detroit, he addressed the colored citizens in the evening in one of their three churches, the Methodist, and was warmly received. Adrian was revisited on account of the State Anti-Slavery Convention appointed for October 22, 23, at which a Michigan Anti-Slavery Society was founded. Lib. 23.179. Thence began Mr. Garrison's homeward journey by way of Ohio, the kindest of hosts being found in Joshua R. Lib. 23.190; Nov. 3. Giddings at Jefferson. Boston was reached early in November, but home had once more to be abandoned Lib. 23.182. before the close of this restless year. The second decade of the American Anti-Slavery Society called for Lib. 23.170, [194], [195]; Pamphlet Proceedings Am. A. S. S. at its 2d Decade. commemoration, in Philadelphia, on December 3 and 4. Mr. Garrison presided, Samuel J. May read once more the Declaration of Sentiments of 1833. Noticeable was the number of women speakers. Not less so was the dri
Windsor, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
press in this country is as foul as the gutter, and as unprincipled as the father of lies. Most of the proprietors and editors more richly deserve a place in the penitentiary than many of its inmates; for they sin as with a cartrope, and on the largest and most comprehensive scale. It is a terrible sign of general corruption. To pass the time, on Sunday, October 16, Mr. Garrison Ms. Oct. 17, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G. crossed the Detroit River, and first set foot on Canadian soil at Windsor—a fit place, as it was largely populated by fugitives from the United States. He walked also to the neighboring Sandwich, likewise a place of refuge from American tyranny, and saw the barracks (formerly occupied by British soldiers) which, winter before last, were opened to shelter the crowd of fugitive slaves then hastening to that spot, to prevent them from perishing. Returning to Detroit, he addressed the colored citizens in the evening in one of their three churches, the Methodist, a
Plymouth (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ough she had been an angelic visitant from another sphere. . . . This afternoon I leave for Detroit, where I am to speak to-morrow afternoon and evening. There is a good deal of excitement in that place, caused by the recent meetings held there by S. S. and Abby K. Foster. The Detroit papers are full of pro-slavery slang, especially the Free Soil paper, which Free Democrat. has assailed our friends after the style of Bennett's Herald. On November 9, 1853, Mrs. Foster wrote from Plymouth, Mich., to Samuel May, Jr. (Ms.): We are doing over again, in Michigan, what we did nearly fifteen years ago in New England, and eight years ago in Ohio— fighting New Organization, here under the cover of Free Democracy. We little dreamed, when we came here, what we should have to encounter. It never occurred to us that, as a matter of course, this conflict must be passed [through] everywhere before genuine anti-slavery could get a substantial footing. When we went to Detroit, we did not ev
Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
marks towards one topic—the public estimation of the abolitionists as infidels. On this head the following correspondence will be found instructive. Mrs. Stowe had returned in September from Sept. 18, 1853; Lib. 23.151. her foreign tour, during which, if she had been taken under the wing of the Glasgow female sectarian abolitionists, engaged at the very moment in advertising Mr. Lib. 23.73. Garrison's infidelity, she had on the other hand been the guest Lib. 23.155. of Mrs. Chapman in Paris. Harriet Beecher Stowe to W. L. Garrison. [Andover, Mass., November, 1853.] Ms., no date. Cf. Dear Sir: The letter you were so kind as to address to me Lib. 23.202. on my departure for Europe, I was unable to read for some time, owing to ill health. When I could read, I had not strength to reply to it. In Switzerland, I projected the plan of a letter which I meant to have addressed to you publicly through the columns of the Liberator. That was never finished, but I think I sh
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
peak to-morrow afternoon and evening. There is a good deal of excitement in that place, caused by the recent meetings held there by S. S. and Abby K. Foster. The Detroit papers are full of pro-slavery slang, especially the Free Soil paper, which Free Democrat. has assailed our friends after the style of Bennett's Herald. On November 9, 1853, Mrs. Foster wrote from Plymouth, Mich., to Samuel May, Jr. (Ms.): We are doing over again, in Michigan, what we did nearly fifteen years ago in New England, and eight years ago in Ohio— fighting New Organization, here under the cover of Free Democracy. We little dreamed, when we came here, what we should have to encounter. It never occurred to us that, as a matter of course, this conflict must be passed [through] everywhere before genuine anti-slavery could get a substantial footing. When we went to Detroit, we did not even know that the Free Soil paper was edited by two priests. Indeed, we knew almost nothing about it, though, since, we
Oberlin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
all. He took a very subordinate part in the Ms. Sept. 5, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G.; Lib. 23.146. proceedings, in which the women were of right conspicuous. Few of the clergy were visible, and no dignitaries. On the next evening (Saturday), he witnessed the Sept. 3. performance of Uncle Tom's Cabin at the National Theatre. On Sunday morning, he listened to a sermon delivered to a Sept. 4. great audience in Metropolitan Hall by Miss Antoinette Lib. 23.146. L. Brown. A graduate of Oberlin. She was shortly ordained pastor of the Congregational Church at South Butler, N. Y. (Lib. 23: 151). In the afternoon, he spoke in the same place Lib. 23.142, 146. before the New York City Anti-Slavery Society, and attended without addressing the evening meeting, towards the close of which, during the speeches of Lucy Stone, who never acquitted herself better, and Lucretia Mott, the rowdyism led by the redoubtable Rynders became so rampant that the session was cut short. But we are all i
Switzerland (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 13
tionists, engaged at the very moment in advertising Mr. Lib. 23.73. Garrison's infidelity, she had on the other hand been the guest Lib. 23.155. of Mrs. Chapman in Paris. Harriet Beecher Stowe to W. L. Garrison. [Andover, Mass., November, 1853.] Ms., no date. Cf. Dear Sir: The letter you were so kind as to address to me Lib. 23.202. on my departure for Europe, I was unable to read for some time, owing to ill health. When I could read, I had not strength to reply to it. In Switzerland, I projected the plan of a letter which I meant to have addressed to you publicly through the columns of the Liberator. That was never finished, but I think I shall finish and offer it to your columns at some future time. In regard to you, your paper, and, in some measure, your party, I am in an honest embarrassment. I sympathize with you fully in many of your positions; others I consider erroneous, hurtful to liberty and the progress of humanity. Nevertheless, I believe you and tho
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
r country is the world—our countrymen are all mankind. I forgot to add in its place that, under my name, were two hands clasped together, one white, the other black. . . . I spoke at considerable length at both meetings, and was listened to with the most profound attention; and my remarks seemed to be generally well received. It is impossible to say anything new here on the subject of slavery, as they have had all our able lecturers in superabundance. It is almost like carrying coals to Newcastle, and I felt it to be so. I was agreeably surprised, while speaking in the afternoon, to see Sallie Holley Daughter of Myron Holley, for some two years past a very acceptable anti-slavery lecturer. come into the meeting, with her travelling companion, Miss Putnam. She has been laboring with great Caroline F. Putnam. success in Detroit and other places, and will probably be induced to remain in the State a short time longer. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Battle Creek, October 1
Flushing, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
. Those who care may read the outpourings of the press, both secular and religious, on the Infidel Convention, as grouped in the Liberator. The mob, as usual, found Lib. 23.96. there its justification; and frightened editors even talked Lib. 23.95. of securing legislative prohibition of such gatherings in the State of Connecticut, in view of the announcement Proceedings Hartford Bible Convention, p. 371. that another Bible Convention would be held in January, 1854. An excursion to Flushing, Long Island, in August, to take part in the celebration of West India emancipation Aug. 4, 1853; Lib. 23.129. under the management of the New York City Anti-Slavery Society, This organization was consequent upon the transfer of Oliver Johnson from the editorship of the Pennsylvania Freeman to the associate editorship (with S. H. Gay) of the National Anti-Slavery Standard (Lib. 23: 47, 50, [78], 107). broke for a moment Mr. Garrison's summer rest. By the end of the same month, he was o
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
gently and truly. The two great pro-slavery parties in the land join with you in glorifying this Union, and pledging to maintain it as a slavery-sustaining compact. If you use the term Union in the ordinary political sense, then I ask how it happens that you who are pledged to give [no] support to slavery are thus in perfect agreement with those parties? If you do not, then I ask where is the Union, and what do you mean by preserving it? Why, are you not conscious of the fact that in South Carolina, in Alabama, in any slaveholding State, this anti-slavery gathering would not be tolerated? We should all be deemed worthy of Lynch law, and in all probability be subjected to a coat of tar and feathers! What a glorious Union it is that we are enjoying! How worthy of preservation! Alas! the Union is but another name for the iron reign of the Slave Power. We have no common country, as yet. God grant we may have! We have no common Union, as yet. God grant we may have! We shall hav
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