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Frederick Douglass (search for this): chapter 16
pon her successful defeat, regrets only that she did not, before it became too late, procure the photographs of her two dozen unknown friends. In the summer of 1867, the people of Kansas were to debate, and in the autumn to decide, the most novel, noble, and beautiful question ever put to a popular vote in the United States,the question of adopting a new Constitution whose peculiarity was that it extended the elective franchise not merely to white male citizens, but to those of what Frederick Douglass calls the less fashionable color, and to those also of what Horace Greeley calls the less muscular sex. Mrs. Lucy Stone and Miss Olympia Brown-helped by other ladies less famous, and by several earnest men, including the lion. Samuel C. Pomeroy, Senator of the United Statesmade public speeches at prominent places in that State, urging the people to give the new idea a hospitable welcome at the polls. This canvass was as chivalrous as a tournament, and abounded, from beginning to en
Revised Statutes (search for this): chapter 16
spent at Johnstown, dividing her time between book-delving and horse-taming, and, having an almost equal relish for each, she conquered the books in her father's library, and the horses in her father's stable. In fact, she would sometimes ride half the day over hill and meadow, like a fox-hunter, and then study law-books half the night, like a jurist. When she was busy at her embroidery or water-colors, her father, who had a poor opinion of such accomplishments, would bring to her the Revised Statutes, and say, My daughter, here is a book which, if you read it, will give you something sensible to say to Mr. Spencer and Mr. Williams when they next make us a visit. Mr. Spencer and Mr. Williams were legal magnates, who made Judge Cady's dinner-table a frequent arena for the discussion of nice points of law. So Elizabeth, with a fine determination to make herself the peer of the whole table, diligently began and pursued that study of the laws of her country, which has since armed and eq
sh negotiator with the Indians. During her girlhood, it was an arena for the intellectual wrestlings of Kent, Tompkins, Spencer, Elisha Williams, and Abraham Van Vechten, who, as lawyers, were among the chiefest of their time. It is now devoted mavised Statutes, and say, My daughter, here is a book which, if you read it, will give you something sensible to say to Mr. Spencer and Mr. Williams when they next make us a visit. Mr. Spencer and Mr. Williams were legal magnates, who made Judge CadMr. Spencer and Mr. Williams were legal magnates, who made Judge Cady's dinner-table a frequent arena for the discussion of nice points of law. So Elizabeth, with a fine determination to make herself the peer of the whole table, diligently began and pursued that study of the laws of her country, which has since armemember how you used to give me law-books to read in order that I might have something sensible to say to your friends, Mr. Spencer and Mr. Williams, when they came to dine with us? It was by reading those law-books that I found out the injustice of
Olympia Brown (search for this): chapter 16
In the summer of 1867, the people of Kansas were to debate, and in the autumn to decide, the most novel, noble, and beautiful question ever put to a popular vote in the United States,the question of adopting a new Constitution whose peculiarity was that it extended the elective franchise not merely to white male citizens, but to those of what Frederick Douglass calls the less fashionable color, and to those also of what Horace Greeley calls the less muscular sex. Mrs. Lucy Stone and Miss Olympia Brown-helped by other ladies less famous, and by several earnest men, including the lion. Samuel C. Pomeroy, Senator of the United Statesmade public speeches at prominent places in that State, urging the people to give the new idea a hospitable welcome at the polls. This canvass was as chivalrous as a tournament, and abounded, from beginning to end, with romantic incidents. To hear from the lips of Mrs. Stone (in that delightful eloquence of conversation which she has never surpassed on
John Milton (search for this): chapter 16
eeing a seamstress underpaid, she does not denounce the meanness of the employer so much as the narrow range of women's employments; seeing a widow cheated out of her inheritance, she would not so eagerly seek to punish the scoundrel as to secure woman's suffrage for woman's self protection. It is a settled maxim with me, she says, that the existing public sentiment on any subject is wrong. Accordingly, as against the customary, stringent laws of divorce, she holds to the doctrine of John Milton; as against the prevailing tariffs, she argues vehemently for free trade; as against old-fashioned religious opinions, she inclines to an unchecked free-thinking; and as against the common notion of what constitutes woman's sphere, she holds that woman's sphere is to be widened unto equal greatness with man's. If it be supposed that, in all I his, she desires to make woman less womanly, such a supposition is unjust. It is because, under the present canons of society woman's nature is
Elizabeth Cady (search for this): chapter 16
hat one can render in a biographical sketch. Elizabeth Cady, daughter of Judge Daniel Cady and Margaret Livght of six different counties in clear weather, Elizabeth Cady, a child of free winds and flowing brooks, roampe, exclaimed, This is a liberal education! so Elizabeth Cady, in addition to her books, her globes, her watereek lexicon, testament, and grammar, I give to Elizabeth Cady. Great was the void which the doctor's deathn based on a more sensible theory. Just when Elizabeth Cady's heart was most set on Union College,--whitherer and Mr. Williams were legal magnates, who made Judge Cady's dinner-table a frequent arena for the discussiot. Often and often, during her maidenly years, Elizabeth Cady had pondered the many-sided question of woman'sined the general crowd of critics and satirists. Judge Cady, on hearing of what his daughter had done, fancieoduction as if it had been made and pronounced by Judge Cady himself. This, to the daughter's ears, was suffi
Elizabeth Cady Stanton (search for this): chapter 16
in behalf of the women of our country, Elizabeth Cady Stanton. I have seen the old and tattered mer a friendship of extraordinary strength. Mrs. Stanton is a fine writer, but poor executant; Miss praise. I have carefully read several of Mrs. Stanton's other addresses before the New York Legisribed: For Representative in Congress, Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Mrs. Stanton is the only woman in ur support in the coming election. Elizabeth Cady Stanton. New York, October 10, 1866. The never sincere in anything-warmly advocated Mrs. Stanton's election. A lady of fine presence and acfirst with Miss Anthony and afterwards with Mrs. Stanton) was Mr. George Francis Train, soldier of fnt her features, and sum up her character. Mrs. Stanton's face is thought to resemble Martha Washin and defeated of its true end and aim, that Mrs. Stanton, being a woman herself, so earnestly tries --and to present her back once more to God. Mrs. Stanton's knowledge of human nature in its various [15 more...]
Lucy Stone (search for this): chapter 16
claims of an unpopular cause has been more common in many other States than in New York; most common, perhaps, in Massachusetts. With the single exception of Mrs. Lucy Stone,--a noble and gifted woman, to whom her sisterhood owe an affectionate gratitude, not merely for an eloquence that has charmed thousands of ears, but for pracale citizens, but to those of what Frederick Douglass calls the less fashionable color, and to those also of what Horace Greeley calls the less muscular sex. Mrs. Lucy Stone and Miss Olympia Brown-helped by other ladies less famous, and by several earnest men, including the lion. Samuel C. Pomeroy, Senator of the United Statesmade welcome at the polls. This canvass was as chivalrous as a tournament, and abounded, from beginning to end, with romantic incidents. To hear from the lips of Mrs. Stone (in that delightful eloquence of conversation which she has never surpassed on the platform), a recital of the most serious or the most comical of these, is as
Henry B. Stanton (search for this): chapter 16
ork State, she made the acquaintance of Mr. Henry B. Stanton, then a young and fervid orator, who haely for pleasure and sight-seeing, but that Mr. Stanton might fulfil the mission of a delegate to t in the debate.--It was then and there that Mrs. Stanton, for the first time, saw, heard, and becameby another's lips. All the women with whom Mrs. Stanton had ever associated in America had, without visiting the British Museum, Mrs. Mott and Mrs. Stanton, who were of the company, had hardly entereed to look for in the whole British Museum. Mrs. Stanton's enthusiasm for Mrs. Mott continues still Lucretia Mott. On returning to America, Mr. Stanton began the practice of law in Boston, where,de by any organized convention, previous to Mrs. Stanton's demand for it in the following resolutiont gracefully and triumphantly, performed by Mrs. Stanton. That convention, and, above all, its dethe Seneca Falls Convention to the present, Mrs. Stanton has been one of the representative women of[3 more...]
er the question had been decided, and decided unjustly-refused to present his credentials, took no part in the proceedings, and sat a silent spectator in the gallery,--one of the most chivalrous acts of his life. Beaten in the committee, the ladies transferred the question to the social circles. Every dinner-table at which they were present grew lively with the theme. At a dinner-table in Queen Street, Mrs. Lucretia Mott--then in the prime of her intellectual powers, and with a head which Combe, the phrenologist, pronounced the finest he had ever seen on a woman-replied so skilfully to the arguments of a dozen friendly opponents, chiefly clergymen, that she was the acknowledged victor in the debate.--It was then and there that Mrs. Stanton, for the first time, saw, heard, and became acquainted with Lucretia Mott. Often and often, during her maidenly years, Elizabeth Cady had pondered the many-sided question of woman's relations to society, to the State, to the industrial arts, and
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