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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen. Search the whole document.

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New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
y should Mrs. Lozier, a gentle, modest, unambitious, home-loving woman, have chosen the calling of a physician? We shall see as we sketch her biography. She was born Dec. 11, 1813, at Plainfield, New Jersey, the youngest of thirteen children. Her father was a farmer, David Harned,--a name well known at that period in the Methodist Church, of which he was a faithful member, and in which his brothers were successful preachers. Her mother was Hannah Walker. Previous to their residence in New Jersey, they spent some years in Virginia, where Indian tribes, noted for their sagacity, were then numerous. Mrs. Harned, a devout Quakeress, and with much missionary spirit, mingled freely with them. From them she gained valuable information, which, added to reading and close observation, with strong natural predilection, qualified her to act efficiently in the neighborhood as an attendant upon the sick. Subsequently she spent seven years in New York city, engaged in general practice, with
West Chester (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
love of nature, with a sensitive nervous organization. Miss Preston evidently combines in herself the constitutional traits of both parents. Her only sister dying in infancy, the delicate health of her mother brought the chief care of a large family upon her, making her early life one of close occupation and grave responsibilities. Her opportunities for education were therefore limited to the country school (which, however, was of high order), and a period spent at boarding-school in West Chester, the county town. But the neighborhood of their residence was one of remarkable intellectual activity and culture, and of moral excellence. A valuable public library, with a Lyceum and Literary Association, gave tone to society, diffused intelligence and promoted discussion upon all current questions. She regards her connection with these as one of the richest blessings of her youth, and as having important bearing upon her subsequent life. During that period, also, she shared largely
Camden, Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
abundant in those fruits of pure and undefiled religion, which consist in visiting the widow and the fatherless in their affliction, and keeping unspotted from the world, and we trust is actuated in it by the divine precept to do good and to communicate; for with such sacrifices God is well pleased. A younger sister, Miss Jane V. Myers, M. D., resides in her family, and has a large and lucrative independent practice. An older half-sister, Mrs. Mary F. Thomas, M. D., now living at Camden, Indiana, has been actively engaged in that State several years. For two years she was editor, and for a longer time contributor to a semi-monthly journal devoted mainly to the cause of women, published in Richmond, Indiana. During the rebellion she was occupied much in collecting and distributing supplies, and a portion of the time her husband, 0. Thomas, M. D., and herself had charge of a hospital in Tennessee. Miss. Ann Preston, M. D. If we were seeking a subject for an attractive bi
Quaker (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
putation merged in whatever good they may accomplish. Yet the public, who witness and honor these results of unobtrusive labor, have right to know more of the personality of one who is so clearly a workman that needeth not to be ashamed. She was born December, 1830, at West Grove, Pennsylvania, in the old homestead of her grandfather, where her father was born and died, and where she lived until constrained to leave it for a wider sphere of action. Her father was Amos Preston, a devoted Quaker. An obituary notice of him, by one who had known him from childhood, speaks of him as a man of unusual intellectual gifts, enthusiastic in the pursuit of truth, particularly on those subjects which most nearly affect the present and everlasting welfare of the race, and inflexibly faithful to his convictions of duty; possessed of a warm social nature and a rare faculty for entering into sympathy with the wants and interests of others, which, together with his acknowledged disinterestedness,
Plainfield (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
se causes there is often much that is palpably providential,the impelling of divine influences through extraordinary arrangements,--and there is much of natural operations in accordance with the recognized fitness of things. Both these facts will be apparent in the instance we are now to consider. Why should Mrs. Lozier, a gentle, modest, unambitious, home-loving woman, have chosen the calling of a physician? We shall see as we sketch her biography. She was born Dec. 11, 1813, at Plainfield, New Jersey, the youngest of thirteen children. Her father was a farmer, David Harned,--a name well known at that period in the Methodist Church, of which he was a faithful member, and in which his brothers were successful preachers. Her mother was Hannah Walker. Previous to their residence in New Jersey, they spent some years in Virginia, where Indian tribes, noted for their sagacity, were then numerous. Mrs. Harned, a devout Quakeress, and with much missionary spirit, mingled freely with t
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 21
, moved by the evident approval of her associates in study, were satisfied at last that her motives were honorable, and her abilities adequate to her work. The same year, Miss Blackwell went to Europe, and entered as a student La Maternite, at Paris, with special reference to obstetrics. She also studied in 1850 and 1851 at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, in London. In the autumn of 1851 she returned, and commenced practice in New York city. Here again she experienced difficulties which only and spending the summer vacations in such attendance as was permitted her at Bellevue Hospital, New York, and graduated at the Cleveland College in February, 1854. That year and the two following she spent abroad,--one year in Edinburgh, one in Paris, one in London; and returning in December, 1856, located in New York. We regret that our limits forbid a more extended reference to this lady, whose abilities, attainments, and personal excellences cause her to share the respect of the public an
Montgomery County (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
large success in general practice, the other the influences to be quietly exerted in the department of professional instruction. We draw both instances from Philadelphia, partly because they well represent the college established there, and partly because that city is probably the best field in which this branch of woman:a labors can fairly exhibit its fruits. Mrs. Hannah E. Longshore, M. D. Mrs. Longshore is the daughter of Samuel and Paulian Myers, born May 30th, 1819, in Montgomery County, Maryland. Her parents were natives of Buiks County, Pennsylvania, and members of the Society of friends. When she was two years old, they moved into the District of Columbia, where she received her early education, attending a private school in Washington City. In the year 1832, unwilling to remain longer under the demoralizing influence of a slave-holding community, they again changed their residence, and settled on a farm in Columbiana County, Ohio. Here the whole household co-operat
Philadelphia County (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
pensary connected with it, during the past year. Miss Preston was at the outset appointed one of its board of managers, corresponding secretary, and consulting physician, and still acts in those capacities. During this period her private practice has become sufficiently established and remunerative to meet all her wishes, though her frail health, requiring constant vigilance against over-exertion, has obliged her to limit it,--refusing night calls and obstetrical cases. In 1867 the Philadelphia County Medical Society adopted a preamble and resolutions setting forth in plain terms their objections to the practice of medicine by women, and declining to meet them in consultation,--a conclusion, however, by which many of their most reliable members refused to be bound. Miss Preston immediately published a reply, so admirable in temper and argument as to turn the tide of opinion, both in the profession and outside of it, among intelligent observers, very much in favor of those in whose
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ps, skeletons, and preparations of her brother-in-law, Prof. J. S. Longshore, who was also her preceptor, were at her service. She proceeded with the usual course, and at the end of two years entered as a student the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania, located in Philadelphia. It was the first session of that institution. At the close of the second session, in 1850, she was one of the ten members who composed the first graduating class. As an indication of regard for her qualifications, manently take. At this midway point, when the ties which had so long bound her to the ordinary routine of woman's cares were loosened, and the remaining half of probable life required definite direction, in 1850 the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania was opened at Philadelphia. Information of proposals preliminary to it had reached her and engaged her thoughtful attention, and when they developed into practical form it commended itself to her as meeting a vital want in society. It satisf
Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 21
ongs the credit of being foremost in this change, first to admit, and most liberal in fostering it. In England a female medical society has existed several years, and offers facilities for instruction by means of lectures upon some branches, sufficient to qualify for a diploma from Apothecaries' Hall. In connection with it there is now a Ladies' Medical College, which recently announced fifty students. But the aim of the whole movement is at present only to furnish well trained midwives. In Paris the Maternity Hospital affords opportunity for observation in the department which its name indicates, with whatever forms of disease may be collateral or incidental, and receives women nominally as students, but they are not allowed to prescribe in the wards, nor instructed in regard to the remedies used. Indeed, they can hardly rise above the position of proficient nurses. In both countries, the way to the entrance of women upon general practice among their own sex has scarcely yet beg
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