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Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
of opera, in which Madame Sontag was the star. The two artists created a genuine furore, exciting their Southern audiences to the highest pitch of enthusiasm. Bouquets came in showers, and the applause was incessant. One night Madame Sontag carried eighty-six bouquets from the stage, and the fairy violinist often received fifteen or twenty. From New Orleans Madame Sontag went to Mexico, and Camilla never saw her again. They parted in March, 1854, and Signor Urso took his daughter to Savannah, and subsequently gave concerts in different cities of Georgia and some other Southern States. They then returned to New York, where, in May, they heard of the sudden death of Madame Sontag by cholera. The news of this loss prostrated the sensitive child with grief. She refused to appear at concerts, and seemed to lose all animation and vivacity. A change of scene was at last imperatively necessary, and she went with her father to Canada in 1856. This trip was very successful, thou
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
created a genuine furore, exciting their Southern audiences to the highest pitch of enthusiasm. Bouquets came in showers, and the applause was incessant. One night Madame Sontag carried eighty-six bouquets from the stage, and the fairy violinist often received fifteen or twenty. From New Orleans Madame Sontag went to Mexico, and Camilla never saw her again. They parted in March, 1854, and Signor Urso took his daughter to Savannah, and subsequently gave concerts in different cities of Georgia and some other Southern States. They then returned to New York, where, in May, they heard of the sudden death of Madame Sontag by cholera. The news of this loss prostrated the sensitive child with grief. She refused to appear at concerts, and seemed to lose all animation and vivacity. A change of scene was at last imperatively necessary, and she went with her father to Canada in 1856. This trip was very successful, though not entirely professional. She travelled through the countr
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ever advance in position and influence, she might claim his protection, and he would be happy to do her any favor in his power. The wily Man of destiny, whose ambition was even then planning the renewal of the empire, and an attempted mastership of Europe, has probably forgotten the pledge. Camilla has never reminded him of it, preferring to depend on her own powers for all place she may hold in the world's esteem. In 1852 the little Urso received propositions from a Mr. Faugas, of North Carolina, to come to America. He offered her a salary of twenty thousand dollars a year; and, as the family was in need of the assistance the child's violin could give, the offer was gladly accepted. Preparations were made for an extensive tour, and a concert-troupe of eight was engaged. Auber, hearing of her intended departure, presented her with the following testimonial, which she justly regards as one of her dearest treasures-- National Conservatory of music and of declamation. Paris,
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
in a velvet box, bearing upon the cover her initials in gold within a laurel wreath. Engagements now crowded upon her, and she visited in succession most of the cities that had known her as a child, spending much time in Boston, New York, and Chicago. In 1864 she went to Europe, sailing in the China, on the 26th of August. Reaching Liverpool she prepared at once to go to Paris,--her home for some years, and the scene of some of her earliest triumphs. She was wonderfully successful in th their opinions of Camilla's playing in remarks equally earnest, though hardly scientific. One auditor, after listening to her in wide-mouthed amazement, declared with a most emphatic gesture, that she was woman enough to vote. At a concert in Chicago, an admirer, who was asked whether there had been any flowers on the stage that night, answered, None but Camelia Urso. In the spring of 1865, soon after her return from Europe, Madame Urso played at a concert in New Haven. The hall was crow
Boulogne (France) (search for this): chapter 22
-won crosses, rendered homage to the fair violinist, who saw with delight the faces of Alexander Dumas, Lord Cowley, and Professor Alard. Her finest morceau on this occasion was a Fantasie-Caprice of Vieuxtemps. From Paris she went to Arras, Boulogne, Valenciennes, and Cambray. At Boulogne she appeared at two successive concerts given by the Musical Society of that town,--a circumstance almost unknown in the records of the society. After spending fourteen months abroad, she returned to ABoulogne she appeared at two successive concerts given by the Musical Society of that town,--a circumstance almost unknown in the records of the society. After spending fourteen months abroad, she returned to America, where she has remained ever since. Her life since then has been the same story of travel, study, and concerts. She has become a great favorite both in the East and West. What Boston thinks of her may be understood from the fact that she has given more than one hundred concerts in that city. There she feels herself entirely at home, surrounded by sympathetic and appreciative friends. One of the sincerest and most highly prized of all tributes to her musical accomplishments is a let
China (China) (search for this): chapter 22
the watch decorated with green enamel, and a diamond of great value. On one side of the watch was engraved,-- Camilla Urso. From her Boston friends. Nov. 8th, 1863. The gift was enclosed in a velvet box, bearing upon the cover her initials in gold within a laurel wreath. Engagements now crowded upon her, and she visited in succession most of the cities that had known her as a child, spending much time in Boston, New York, and Chicago. In 1864 she went to Europe, sailing in the China, on the 26th of August. Reaching Liverpool she prepared at once to go to Paris,--her home for some years, and the scene of some of her earliest triumphs. She was wonderfully successful in this centre of art, and became the lioness of the saloons. Pasdeloup's monster orchestra was then performing in the Cirque Napoleon. Paris, with all its superb theatres has no large music hall. Camilla Urso was invited to play with this orchestra, and played, at one of their concerts, Mendelssohn's
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
as one of her dearest treasures-- National Conservatory of music and of declamation. Paris, August 12, 1852. Mademoiselle Camilla Urso is a young pupil of the National Conservatory of Music. Although still at a very tender age, she has obtained brilliant success in several concerts in Paris, and above all at the Conservatory, where the jury have decreed to her by election the first prize at the competition for the prizes of the year. Learning that she is soon to depart for the United States, I am delighted to state the happy qualities which ought to ensure her a noble artistic career. The Americans have already nobly proved that they are not only just appreciators of the fine arts, especially of music, but that they know as well how to recompense with generosity the merits of the celebrated artists who are heard in the hospitable towns of their rich and beautiful country. Auber, Member of the Institute, Director of the Conservatory. The child-artist came to this
me combining the three national colors of France. The gallant marines showed her a hundred graceful attentions, presented her with bouquets, and she, in return, bewitched them with the music of her violin. While in Canada she met with a serious loss. Her collection of presents, containing a magnificent bracelet presented by the Germania Society; her cross of pearls with its chain of coral, and other ornaments of great value, prized as the souvenirs of her childhood's triumphs, and her European residence, were in New York. On the 22d of February, 1859, when the people of the house where she had left her property had gone to see the annual parade in honor of Washington's birthday, some one entered and possessed himself of her jewels. Search was unavailing, nothing was ever again heard of them. On her return from Canada her mother met her in New York. The joy of mother and daughter, reunited after so long a separation, may easily be imagined. They spent some time together, an
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
She had received overtures from a Mrs. McCready, a reader of some celebrity at that time, to accompany her in a tour through the West. They proceeded as far as Nashville, Signor Urso remaining in New York, when Camilla discovered that the contract was not to be fulfilled, the readings not to be continued,--in short, that she had fallen once more into the hands of swindlers. The McCreadys, after treating her with great injustice and unkindness, left her penniless in Nashville. A pitiful position for a young girl scarcely fifteen years old! But Camilla's courage and resources were fully equal to the occasion. This timid creature, who had always relied enrmation of the state of affairs, and then applied to a musician of the city for some counsel as to time and place. She enlisted the sympathy of the citizens of Nashville. The result was a full house, and four hundred dollars for the empty pocket. Soon after this she retired from public life. For five years she did not appear
France (France) (search for this): chapter 22
rip was very successful, though not entirely professional. She travelled through the country, giving some concerts, and winning admiration from crowded houses. One incident of her trip was very enjoyable,--her reception on board of a French corvette. The officers desired to do honor to their gifted little compatriot, and invited her to visit them. She was then a charming young lady of fourteen She appeared before her admiring friends in a costume combining the three national colors of France. The gallant marines showed her a hundred graceful attentions, presented her with bouquets, and she, in return, bewitched them with the music of her violin. While in Canada she met with a serious loss. Her collection of presents, containing a magnificent bracelet presented by the Germania Society; her cross of pearls with its chain of coral, and other ornaments of great value, prized as the souvenirs of her childhood's triumphs, and her European residence, were in New York. On the 22d
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