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o be observed, first. I shall send you light sketches, in which you will find the chat of the bar, benches, and the dinner-table, and also the results of my observation of the subjects in court, on circuit, in Westminster Hall, and in society. Most of the judges go to the court in the morning on horseback, with a groom on another horse behind; and they are notorious as being very poor riders,—though the fate of Twysden has been latterly unknown. Lord Shaftesbury, as Lord Chancellor in 1673, undertook to restore the judicial cavalcade, and went mounted from the Strand to Westminster Hall. Judge Twysden, having more gravity than equestrian skill, fell from his horse on the route. He declared that no Lord Chancellor should ever make him mount on horseback again. Campbell's Lives of the Lord Chancellors, Vol. IV. pp. 174, 175. In the winter the court opens at ten o'clock; and they continue sitting till between four and five,—often till seven. Between one and two, they leave th
deficient in decision and occasional sternness. Serjeant Wilde is said to exercise a very great influence over him; indeed, scandal attributes to him some of the power behind the throne greater than the throne. Upon Tindal devolves the decision of all interlocutory matters in his court,—the other judges seldom interposing with regard to them, or, indeed, appearing to interest themselves about them. He is one of the kindest men that ever lived. Next to Tindal is old James Allan Park, 1763-1838. He was born in Edinburgh; published, in 1787, a work on The Law of Marine Insurance; was elected Recorder of Durham in 1802; and was a Judge of the Common Pleas, 1816-1838. the oldest judge on the bench, and who, it is reported, is now at the point of death. He has been some fifty-eight years at the bar and on the bench; is a staunch Tory, and a believer in the divinity of wigs. He dislikes Campbell, the Attorney-General; interrupts counsel very much, and has some of the petulance of a
She and her sister, Georgiana, who was Lord Morpeth's mother, were the daughters of the fifth earl of Devonshire. Lord Granville died in 1846, and Lady Granville in 1862. His son is a distinguished statesman. now in Paris. Sir Robert Inglis expressed himself to-night in terms of the highest admiration of Dr. Channing's Texas, which is a good deal from such a churchman. I passed a very pleasant evening last week—till long past midnight—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession. He co-operated with Romilly in the movement to abolish capital executions for minor offences, and was active in the Temperance reform. He was an enthusiastic student of Bacon, editing the works, and writing the life of the philosopher. His edition was the text of Macaulay's famous article in the Edinburgh Review. His daughte
ersity with distinguished honor, and has recently been called to the bar: I think him a young man full of promise. Vaughan, though not a man of book-learning himself, respects it in others. I once sat with him in chambers in a matter where one of the young Chittys appeared; at first the judge inclined against the barrister and his authorities, but he said in a way that I saw gave no little pleasure, Mr. Chitty, I have a great respect for your opinion. Bosanquet John Bernard Bosanquet, 1773-1847. He was called to the bar in 1800, and associated as reporter with Sir Christopher Puller; was Counsel of the East India Company, and of the Bank of England; became a judge of the Common Pleas in 1830, resigning in 1842. you well know as a reporter. As a judge he seems dry and reserved, sitting on the extreme left, and apparently taking so little interest in the causes, that his qualities as a judge seem to be all negative. You do not hear him talked of by the bar, nor meet him in soci
st style with statuary and painting, and holding every thing that conduces most to comfort and luxury, with books, magazines, and papers all within call. Here also you may meet the best society of London. I have often met Hallam Henry Hallam, 1777-1859. He invited Sumner several times to dine with him,—once in company with Professor Whewell,—and expressed his regard by other attentions. Sumner met the historian again in London, in September, 1857. at the Athenaeum. I was standing the othoveliest faces he ever looked upon: perhaps he saw and admired the character of the man in his countenance. I have heard many express themselves about him with the greatest fondness. He has a very handsome daughter. Williams John Williams, 1777-1846. He was from his youth distinguished for his excellence in classical studies; assisted Brougham and Denman in the defence of Queen Caroline; attacked in Parliament the delay of business in Chancery under Lord Eldon; became a baron of the Exc
am Sedgwick, 1785—. and one or two M. P. s. Hallam talked about Prescott's book, and praised it very much. He said that Lord Holland was in ecstasy about it; and that he was the most competent judge of it in England. Mr. Mountstuart Elphinstone 1779-1859; noted for his official service in India, and his descriptive and historical writings upon that country.—one of the most remarkable men in England—has read it with the greatest care; and he spoke of it to me with the highest praise. I findushioned seat,—which may with propriety be called the bench, in contradistinction to the chair, which is the seat of a professor. I shall begin with the common law, and, of course, with the Queen's Bench. You know Lord Denman Thomas Denman, 1779-1854, ante, Vol. I. p. 330. He was taught as a child by Mrs. Barbauld; studied at Cambridge; entered Parliament in 1818; was counsel with Brougham for Queen Caroline; became Attorney-General in 1830, and Lord Chief-Justice of the Queen's Bench i
know as a reporter. As a judge he seems dry and reserved, sitting on the extreme left, and apparently taking so little interest in the causes, that his qualities as a judge seem to be all negative. You do not hear him talked of by the bar, nor meet him in society. Lord Denman told me that he went his first circuit as judge in company with Bosanquet, who taught his Lordship how to wear his robes, and which of the various robes to assume on certain days. Next is Coltman, Thomas Coltman, 1781-1849; a judge of the Common Pleas from 1837 until his death. Sumner was invited at different times to dine at his house, 6 Hyde Park Gardens. whose appointment astonished everybody, and is said to have been a job of Brougham. He was of the Northern circuit, and a friend of Brougham. He is a dull man; but as honest and good-natured as the day. I have seen him perplexed in the extreme, both before a jury and in bane, by the arguments of counsel. He is truly amiable, and is much of a libera
John lost his baggage, and over the Wash. . . . Arrived at Holkham, the superb seat of Lord Leicester, better known as Mr. Coke. After four days at Holkham, where were Lords Spencer and Ebrington, Lord Ebrington, second Earl of Fortescue, 1783-1861. He was M. P. for North Devon in 1838. He moved, in 1831, the address of confidence in Lord Grey's administration; was Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland from April, 1839, to September, 1841. Sumner received kindly attentions from him during his vt. the author of Frankenstein. I dined with Theobald, William Theobald, author of The Law of Principal and Surety. whose legal writings you well know, and, stealing away from his drawing-rooms, repaired to Lady Morgan's. Lady Sydney Morgan, 1783-1859; daughter of Robert MacOwen, of the English stage; a native of Dublin, wife of Sir Thomas Charles Morgan, and author of poems, novels, and books of travel. Her writings were much read, and yielded a considerable income; but her style encount
watchman's hourly annunciation of them. When he heard the cry, Four o'clock, and a cloudy morning, he leaped from his bed, threw open his window, and, hailing the terrified watchman, cried out: It's not four o'clock; it wants five minutes of it! and, after this volley, at once fell asleep. At the same dinner last week, I met Hallam, Whewell, Babbage, Lyell, Sir Charles Lyell, 1797-1875. Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey Murchison, 1792-1871. Dr. Buckland, Sedgwick, Rev. Adam Sedgwick, 1785—. and one or two M. P. s. Hallam talked about Prescott's book, and praised it very much. He said that Lord Holland was in ecstasy about it; and that he was the most competent judge of it in England. Mr. Mountstuart Elphinstone 1779-1859; noted for his official service in India, and his descriptive and historical writings upon that country.—one of the most remarkable men in England—has read it with the greatest care; and he spoke of it to me with the highest praise. I find myself in such<
. . Arrived at Holkham, the superb seat of Lord Leicester, better known as Mr. Coke. After four days at Holkham, where were Lords Spencer and Ebrington, Lord Ebrington, second Earl of Fortescue, 1783-1861. He was M. P. for North Devon in 1838. He moved, in 1831, the address of confidence in Lord Grey's administration; was Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland from April, 1839, to September, 1841. Sumner received kindly attentions from him during his visit to England in 1857. Edward Ellice, 1786-1863. He represented Coventry in Parliament from 1818 (except from 1826 to 1830) until his death; was, in 1830, joint Secretary of the Treasury, and the Whip of the Whigs in the House of Commons; and Secretary of War for a short time in Lord Melbourne's ministry. His first wife was the sister of Earl Grey, and his second the widow of the Earl of Leicester. He was much interested in French affairs, and was the partisan of Thiers. Greville Memoirs, Chap. XXXII., Jan. 19, 1837. Sumner met h
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