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manhood and of humanity, I earnestly ask that a general congress of women, without limit of nationality, may be appointed and held at some place deemed most convenient, and at the earliest period consistent with its objects, to promote the alliance of the different nationalities, the amicable settlement of international questions, the great and general interests of peace. The appeal was translated into French, Spanish, Italian, German, and Swedish, and sent broadcast far and wide. In October our mother wrote to Aaron Powell, president of the American Peace Society: The issue is one which will unite virtually the whole sex. God gave us, I think, the word to say, but it ought to be followed by immediate and organizing action.... Now, you, my dear sir, are bound, as a Friend and as an Advocate of Peace, to take especial interest in this matter, so I call upon you a little confidently, hoping that you will help my unbusinesslike and unskilful hands to go on with this good work. I
December 23rd (search for this): chapter 14
tle now and help me. I have wings but no feet nor hands — rather, only a voice, vox et praeterea nihil. The next step was to call together those persons supposedly interested in such a movement. In December, 1870, it was announced that a meeting for the purpose of considering and arranging the steps necessary to be taken for calling a World's Congress of Women in behalf of International Peace would be held in Union League Hall, Madison Avenue and Twentysixth Street, New York, on Friday, December 23. The announcement, which sets forth the need for and objects of such a congress, is signed by Julia Ward Howe, William Cullen Bryant, and Mary F. Davis. The meeting was an important one: there were addresses by Lucretia Mott, Octavius Frothingham, and Alfred Love, the Peace prophet of Philadelphia; letters from John Stuart Mill, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and William Howard Furness, who adjures peacelovers to labor for the establishment of a Supreme Court to which all differences betw
of it, to herself and to others. We have seen her in London as a bride, enjoying to the full its gayeties and hospitality, as bright a vision as any that met her eyes, with a companion to whom all doors opened eagerly. This was the picture of 1843; that of 1872 is different, indeed. A woman of middle age, quiet in dress and manner, with a serene and constant dignity; a face in which the lines of thought and study were deepening year by year; eyes now flashing with mirth, now tender with , where I simply spoke of my endeavors to enlist the sympathies and efforts of women in behalf of the world's peace. Returning to London, she had the privilege of attending as a delegate one of the great Prison Reform meetings of our day. In 1843, Julia the bride would not have considered it a privilege to attend a meeting for prison reform. She would have shrugged her shoulders, would perhaps have pouted because the Chevalier cared more for these things than for the opera, with Grisi, M
December, 1851 AD (search for this): chapter 14
ights, and moved gladly to meet her. Now, as ever, she staked her life upon the red. The empty spaces must be filled. Study no longer sufficed: the need of serving humanity actively, hand and foot, pen and voice, was now urgent. Her first work under this new impulse was for peace. The Franco-Prussian War of 1870 made a deep and painful impression upon her. She had felt a bitter dislike for Louis Napoleon ever since the day when he stabbed France in her sleep by the Coup d'ttat of December, 1851; but she loved France and the French people; the overwhelming defeat, the bitter humiliation suffered by them filled her with sorrow and indignation. In a lecture on Paris she says: The great Exposition of 1867 had drawn together an immense crowd from all parts of the world. Among its marvels, my recollection dwells most upon the gallery of French paintings, in which I stood more than once before a full-length portrait of the then Emperor. Napoleon III. I looked into the face which
as now urgent. Her first work under this new impulse was for peace. The Franco-Prussian War of 1870 made a deep and painful impression upon her. She had felt a bitter dislike for Louis Napoleon ever since the day when he stabbed France in her sleep by the Coup d'ttat of December, 1851; but she loved France and the French people; the overwhelming defeat, the bitter humiliation suffered by them filled her with sorrow and indignation. In a lecture on Paris she says: The great Exposition of 1867 had drawn together an immense crowd from all parts of the world. Among its marvels, my recollection dwells most upon the gallery of French paintings, in which I stood more than once before a full-length portrait of the then Emperor. Napoleon III. I looked into the face which seemed to say: I have succeeded. What has any one to say about it? And I pondered the slow movements of that heavenly Justice whose infallible decrees are not to be evaded. Her Reminiscences say: As I was revolvi
Chapter 14: the peace crusade 1870-1872; aet. 51-53 Endeavor “What hast thou for thy scattered seed, O Sower of the plain? Where are the many gathered sheaves Thy hope should bring again?” “The only record of my work Lies in the buried grain.” “O Conqueror of a thousand fields! In dinted armor dight, What growths of purple amaranth Shall crown thy brow of might?” “Only the blossom of my life Flung widely in the fight.” “What is the harvest of thy saints, O God! who dost abide? Whe upon the red. The empty spaces must be filled. Study no longer sufficed: the need of serving humanity actively, hand and foot, pen and voice, was now urgent. Her first work under this new impulse was for peace. The Franco-Prussian War of 1870 made a deep and painful impression upon her. She had felt a bitter dislike for Louis Napoleon ever since the day when he stabbed France in her sleep by the Coup d'ttat of December, 1851; but she loved France and the French people; the
September, 1870 AD (search for this): chapter 14
Why do not the mothers of mankind interfere in these matters, to prevent the waste of that human life of which they alone bear and know the cost? I had never thought of this before. The august dignity of motherhood and its terrible responsibilities now appeared to me in a new aspect, and I could think of no better way of expressing my sense of these than that of sending forth an appeal to womanhood throughout the world, which I then and there composed. This appeal is dated Boston, September, 1870. Appeal to womanhood throughout the world Again, in the sight of the Christian world, have the skill and power of two great nations exhausted themselves in mutual murder. Again have the sacred questions of international justice been committed to the fatal mediation of military weapons. In this day of progress, in this century of light, the ambition of rulers has been allowed to barter the dear interests of domestic life for the bloody exchanges of the battle-field. Thus men ha
December, 1870 AD (search for this): chapter 14
rganizations of the Woman Suffrage Movement. But I should wish to move for various meetings in which the matter of my appeal, the direct intervention of Woman in the Pacification of the World, should be discussed, and the final move of a general Congress promoted. Please take hold a little now and help me. I have wings but no feet nor hands — rather, only a voice, vox et praeterea nihil. The next step was to call together those persons supposedly interested in such a movement. In December, 1870, it was announced that a meeting for the purpose of considering and arranging the steps necessary to be taken for calling a World's Congress of Women in behalf of International Peace would be held in Union League Hall, Madison Avenue and Twentysixth Street, New York, on Friday, December 23. The announcement, which sets forth the need for and objects of such a congress, is signed by Julia Ward Howe, William Cullen Bryant, and Mary F. Davis. The meeting was an important one: there were
iage and departure of the children, still another notable change was wrought, rather joyful than sorrowful, but none the less marking an epoch. Up to this time (1871) the wide, sunny rooms of the house on Beacon Hill had been filled with young, active life. The five children, their friends, their music, their parties, their ta For the tenderness of the one class is set by God to restrain the violence of the other. The New York meeting was followed by one in Boston. In the spring of 1871 the friends of peace met in the rooms of the New England Woman's Club, and formed an American Branch of the Women's International Peace Association: Julia Ward Hoch undertaking the cooperation of all persons is earnestly invited. Before continuing the story of this peace crusade, we return to the Journal. The volume for 1871 is fragmentary, the entries mostly brief and far apart. Written and blank pages are alike significant of the movement going on in her mind, the steadily growing d
Chapter 14: the peace crusade 1870-1872; aet. 51-53 Endeavor “What hast thou for thy scattered seed, O Sower of the plain? Where are the many gathered sheaves Thy hope should bring again?” unced, This Association proposes to hold a World's Congress of Women, in London, in the summer of 1872, in which undertaking the cooperation of all persons is earnestly invited. Before continuing t must be willing that our opposites should think and speak out their belief. In the spring of 1872 she went to England, hoping to hold a Woman's Peace Congress in London. She also hoped to found r eyes, with a companion to whom all doors opened eagerly. This was the picture of 1843; that of 1872 is different, indeed. A woman of middle age, quiet in dress and manner, with a serene and consfor which, but a few years before, she had been sighing: this was the woman who came to London in 1872, alone and unaided; who, standing before the Dark Tower of established Order and Precedent, might
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