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San Martino (Italy) (search for this): chapter 27
ended and was more than well received. Hall Caine came afterwards, and talked long about the Bible. He does not appear to be familiar with the most recent criticism of either Old or New Testament. March 24. There is a third silent party to all our bargains. [Emerson.] I find this passage in his essay on Compensation to-day for the first time, having written my essay on Moral Triangulation of the Third Party some thirty years ago. March 26. Dined with Mrs. McCreary--the Duke of San Martino took me in to dinner-Monsignor Dennis O'Connell sat on the other side of me. I had an interesting talk with him. Mrs. McCreary sang my Battle Hymn. They begged me to recite The Flag, which I did. Mrs. Pearse, daughter of Mario and Grisi, sang delightfully. March 30. A fine luncheon party given by Mrs. Iddings, wife of the American Secretary of Embassy at the Grand Hotel. Mme. Ristori was there; I had some glimpses of reminiscence with her. I met her with La terribila Medea, which I so
Manila (Philippines) (search for this): chapter 27
the Countess of Kenmare, at her pleasant apartment in the Via Gregoriana. Among the guests one met at Lady Kenmare's was a dark, handsome Monsignore who spoke English like an Oxford Don, and looked like a Torquemada. Later he became Papal Secretary of State and Cardinal Merry del Val. May 2. Have worked as usual. A pleasant late drive. Dined with Eleutherio, Her brother-in-law, Luther Terry. Daisy Chanler, and Dr. Bull; whist afterwards; news of an engagement and victory for us off Manila. May 4.... We dined with Marchese and Marchesa de Viti de Marco at Palazzo Orsini. Their rooms are very fine, one hung with beautiful crimson damask. An author, Pascarello, was present, who has written comic poems in the Romanesque dialect, the principal one a mock narrative of the discovery of America by Columbus. Our host is a very intelligent man, much occupied with questions of political economy, of which science he is professor at the Collegio Romano. His wife, an American, is al
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
n with Mrs. Stillman to the Campo dei Fiori, where bought two pieces of lace for twenty lire each, and a little cap-pin for five lire. Saw a small ruby and diamond ring which I very much fancied. April 10. Easter Sunday, passed quietly at home. Had an early walk on the terrace. ... A good talk with Hamilton Aide, who told me of the Spartali family. In the afternoon to Lady Kenmare's reception and later to dine with the Lindall Winthrops. April 11. In the afternoon Harriet Monroe, of Chicago, came and read her play — a parlor drama, ingenious and well written. The audience were much pleased with it. April 13.... In the evening dined with Theodore Davis and Mrs. Andrews. Davis showed us his treasures gathered on the Nile shore and gave me a scarab. April 18. .. Went to hear Canon Farrar on the Inferno of Dante — the lecture very scholarly and good. April 22. With Anderson to the Vatican, to see the Pinturicchio frescoes, which are very interesting. He designed the t
Hopedale (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
From the windows they could look down upon the flower-decked Piazza di Spagna, hear the song of the nightingales in the Villa Medici, breathe the perfume of violets and almond blossoms from the Pincio. This morning, or another, Paul Sabatier was among the listeners, a grave, gracious man, a Savoyard pastor, whose Life of Saint Francis of Assisi had set all Rome talking. April 25. To lunch with the Drapers. Had some good talk with Mr. D. [the American Ambassador]. He was brought up at Hopedale in the Community, of which his father was a member, his mother not altogether acquiescing. He went into our Civil War when only twenty years of age, having the day before married a wife. He was badly wounded in the battle of the Wilderness. Mosby [guerilla] met the wounded train, and stripped them of money and watches, taking also the horses of their conveyances. A young Irish lad of fourteen saved Draper's life by running to Bull Plain for aid. April 26. Lunch at Daisy Chanler's, to
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 27
f spirituality. Its mythology was borrowed from Greece and from the Etruscans — later from Egypt and the East. The Primitive Aryan religion was the worship of ancestors. This also we see in Rome. A belief in immortality appears in the true Aryan faith. Man, finding himself human, and related to the divine, felt that he could not die. March 15 ... .Mme. Helbig gave us an account of the Russian pilgrimage which came here lately. Many of the pilgrims were peasants. They travelled from Russia on foot, wearing bark shoes, which are very yielding and soft. These Russian ladies deprecated the action of Peter the Great in building St. Petersburg, and in forcing European civilization upon his nation, when still unprepared for it. March 18. ... Drove with Maud, to get white thorn from Villa Madama. Went afterwards to Mrs. Waldo Story's reception, where met Mrs. McTavish,. youngest daughter of General Winfield Scott. I was at school with one of her older sisters, Virginia, who bec
Russian River (Alaska, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
— later from Egypt and the East. The Primitive Aryan religion was the worship of ancestors. This also we see in Rome. A belief in immortality appears in the true Aryan faith. Man, finding himself human, and related to the divine, felt that he could not die. March 15 ... .Mme. Helbig gave us an account of the Russian pilgrimage which came here lately. Many of the pilgrims were peasants. They travelled from Russia on foot, wearing bark shoes, which are very yielding and soft. These Russian ladies deprecated the action of Peter the Great in building St. Petersburg, and in forcing European civilization upon his nation, when still unprepared for it. March 18. ... Drove with Maud, to get white thorn from Villa Madama. Went afterwards to Mrs. Waldo Story's reception, where met Mrs. McTavish,. youngest daughter of General Winfield Scott. I was at school with one of her older sisters, Virginia, who became a nun. As the winter wore away and the early Roman spring broke, the l
Springfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
el quite sure that it has neglected some good writing of mine, in verse and in prose. I cannot help anticipating for this book the same neglect, and this discourages me somewhat. In the afternoon drove to Monte Janiculo and saw the wonderful view of Rome, and the equestrian statue of Garibaldi crowning the height. We also drove through the Villa Pamfili Doria, which is very beautiful. January 6. To visit Countess Catucci at Villino Catucci. She was a Miss Mary Stearns, of Springfield, Massachusetts. Her husband has been an officer of the King's bersaglieri. Before the unification of Italy, he was sent to Perugia to reclaim deserters from among the recruits for the Italian army. Cardinal Pecci was then living near Perugia. Count Catucci called to assure him with great politeness that he would take his word and not search his premises. The Cardinal treated him with equal politeness, but declined to continue the acquaintance after his removal to Rome, when he became Pope in
Courtland, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
iend of Rossetti and Du Maurier, the idol of literary and artistic London. A warm friendship grew up between them. Together they frequented the antiquaries, gleaning small treasures of ancient lace and peasant jewels. I bought this by the Muse Stillman's advice : this explanation guaranteed the wisdom of purchasing the small rose diamond ring set in black enamel. December 9. Dined with Daisy Chanler. We met there one Brewster and Hendrik Anderson. After dinner came Palmer [son of Courtland] and his sister. He is a pianist of real power and charm — made me think of Paderewski, when I first heard him .... December 10. Drove past the Trevi Fountain and to the Coliseum, where we walked awhile. Ladies came to hear me talk about Women's Clubs. This talk, which I had rather dreaded to give, passed off pleasantly.... Most of the ladies present expressed the desire to have a small and select club of women in Rome. Maud volunteered to make the first effort, with Mme. DesGrange
also we see in Rome. A belief in immortality appears in the true Aryan faith. Man, finding himself human, and related to the divine, felt that he could not die. March 15 ... .Mme. Helbig gave us an account of the Russian pilgrimage which came here lately. Many of the pilgrims were peasants. They travelled from Russia on foot, wearing bark shoes, which are very yielding and soft. These Russian ladies deprecated the action of Peter the Great in building St. Petersburg, and in forcing European civilization upon his nation, when still unprepared for it. March 18. ... Drove with Maud, to get white thorn from Villa Madama. Went afterwards to Mrs. Waldo Story's reception, where met Mrs. McTavish,. youngest daughter of General Winfield Scott. I was at school with one of her older sisters, Virginia, who became a nun. As the winter wore away and the early Roman spring broke, the last vestige of the discomfort of the first weeks vanished. The daily drives to the country in searc
St. Thomas Aquinas (search for this): chapter 27
nch, son of the late Archbishop, Rev. Chevenix Trench. He has been Tennyson's publisher. Did not like T. personally — said he was often rude — read his own poems aloud constantly and very badly; said, No man is a hero to his publisher. Told about his sale of Henry George's book, a cheap edition, one hundred and fifty thousand copies sold in England. February 18. Have done a good morning's work and read in the Nineteenth Century an article on Nelson, and one on the new astronomy. St. Thomas Aquinas's advice regarding the election of an abbot from three candidates:-- What manner of man is the first? Doctissimus. Doceat, says St. Thomas. And the second? Sanctissimus. Oret! and the third? Prudentissimus! Regat! Let him rule! says the Saint. February 20. To Methodist Church of Rev. Mr. Burt. A sensible short discourse — seems a very sincere man: has an earlier service for Italians, well attended. On my way home, stopped at Gargiulo's and bought a ragged<
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