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Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
was completely to uncover the frontier of the loyal States. The force detached by Lee for this expedition consisted of a body of twelve thousand men under General Early. Following the beaten track of invasion, Early marched rapidly down the Shenandoah Valley, arriving before Martinsburg the 3d of July. Sigel, who held post there with a small force, at once retreated across the Potomac at Shepherdstown. General Weber, in command at Harper's Ferry, evacuated the town and retired to Maryland Heights. Hunter, who had made a toilsome march through the Alpine region of Western Virginia, experienced great delays in transporting his troops to Harper's Ferry, owing to the lowness of the river and the breaking of the railroad in several places. He was therefore not in position to check the irruption of the enemy into Maryland, and the Confederates, the way being thus open, passed the Potomac, and marching by way of Hagerstown, on the 7th, reached Frederick—a central point whence they mi
Harrison Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
n the direction of Petersburg, and take up a position where the City Paint Railroad crosses Harrison's Creek. After waiting till about ten o'clock in the forenoon, and finding that the expected ratiodid not arrive, he ordered the forward march of his column towards his assigned position on Harrison's Creek—a position which was marked on a map furnished him from headquarters, and on which it was ltween that place and City Point. As it proved, however, the map was utterly incorrect, and Harrison's Creek, instead of being at the locality indicated on the map, was miles away, and actually insideto General Hancock, who was furnished with a map on which the position to be reached behind Harrison's Creek was marked. But the map proved to be utterly worthless—the only roads laid down on it beinm the Prince George Courthouse road towards Old Courthouse, then by a cross-road get behind Harrison's Creek. Accordingly, Birney's and Gibbon's divisions were turned to the right, leaving the Prince
Jordans Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
olored troops under Hinks, Smith's force, during the night of the 14th, passed to the south side of the Appomattox on a ponton-bridge, and pushed forward, on the morning of the 15th, towards Petersburg, distant seven miles. The advance was made in three columns-Kautz, with the cavalry, to threaten the line of fortifications near the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, and at the same time protect the left flank of the infantry; Hinks' division, in rear of Kautz, tc take position across the Jordan's Point road, as near as possible to the enemy's works; Brooks' division to follow Hinks, and take position on his right; Martindale's division, on the extreme right, to proceed, by the river-road, and strike the City Point Railroad. Smith: Report of Operations against Petersburg. After an advance of two miles, the cavalry struck a line of rifle-trenches, near the City Point Railroad, defended by infantry and armed with a light battery. Upon this, Kautz was withdrawn to the left, and the
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
y uncovered Washington; but the direct line of march by the Shenandoah Valley had been left open to the advance of a hostile force by General Hunter, who, after his defeat before Lynchburg, had taken up an eccentric line of retreat by way of Western Virginia. The effect of this was completely to uncover the frontier of the loyal States. The force detached by Lee for this expedition consisted of a body of twelve thousand men under General Early. Following the beaten track of invasion, Early with a small force, at once retreated across the Potomac at Shepherdstown. General Weber, in command at Harper's Ferry, evacuated the town and retired to Maryland Heights. Hunter, who had made a toilsome march through the Alpine region of Western Virginia, experienced great delays in transporting his troops to Harper's Ferry, owing to the lowness of the river and the breaking of the railroad in several places. He was therefore not in position to check the irruption of the enemy into Maryland
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ast bank of Cedar Creek behind intrenchments drawn on rising and rolling ground—Crook's (Eighth) corps on the left; Emory's (Nineteenth) in the centre, and the Sixth Corps, for the time under Ricketts, on the right. The latter corps was posted somewhat in rear and in reserve. The cavalry divisions of Custer and Merritt guarded the right flank; that of Averill (at this time under Powell) guarded the left, and picketed the whole line of the North Fork of the Shenandoah from Cedar Creek to Front Royal. The army was, at this time, temporarily under the command of General Wright—Sheridan being absent at Washington. The position held by the Union force was too formidable to invite open attack, and Early's only opportunity was to make a surprise. This that officer now determined on, and its execution was begun during the night of the 18-19th October. Soon after midnight, Early, having made his dispositions at Fisher's Hill, moved forward in demonstrations against the Union right, whe
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ition gained. Meade: Report of Operations. The loss in this action was above twenty-five hundred. During these occurrences on the extreme left, General Butler had been operating with the Army of the James against the fortifications of Richmond. Crossing, on the night of the 8th of September, to the north side of the James River, with the corps of Birney and Ord, Butler next morning advanced and carried the very strong fortifications and intrenchments below Chapin's farm, known as Fort Harrison, capturing fifteen pieces of artillery and the New Market road, with the works defending it. Grant: Report of Operations. This success was followed up by an assault upon Fort Gilmer, immediately in front of the Chapin's farm fortifications, in which the assailants were repulsed, with a loss of about three hundred men. The position being one very menacing to Richmond, General Butler made dispositions to hold it permanently. The Confederates endeavored, in several determined assaults,
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ody of a few thousand foot artillerists, hundred days men and invalids under General Wallace, then in command at Baltimore. But on learning the irruption of the enemy across the Potomac, General Grant detached the Sixth Corps from the Army of the Potomac and forwarded it by transports to Washington. It happened, too, at this juncture, that the Nineteenth Corps under General Emory, which had been ordered from New Orleans after the failure of the Red River expedition, had just arrived in Hampton Roads. Without debarking it was sent to follow the Sixth. The advance division of the Sixth Corps under General Ricketts having arrived, General Wallace, with that added to his own heterogeneous force, moved forward to meet Early, and took position on the Monocacy. Here he received battle on the 8th, and though he was discomfited, the stand he made gained time that was of infinite value. Wallace fell back on Baltimore, and the route to Washington being clear, Early at once pushed forward
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
defence had, by the beginning of July, become so formidable that assault was pronounced impracticable by the chiefs of artillery and of engineers. Report of an Examination of the Enemy's Lines, July 6th, by General Hunt, chief of artillery, and Major Duane, chief-engineer. This line consisted of a chain of redans, connected by infantry parapets of a powerful profile, while the approaches were completely obstructed by abatis, stakes, and entanglements. Beginning at the south bank of the Appomattox, it enveloped Petersburg on the east and south, stretching westward beyond the furthest reach of the left flank of the Union army. A continuation of the same system to the north side of the Appomattox protected the city and the Petersburg and Richmond railroad against attack from the direction of the front held by Butler's force at Bermuda Hundred. The defence of Richmond was provided for by its own chain of fortifications. The attitude assumed by Grant before Petersburg was somewhat pe
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
by the outrunning tide. Moreover, many of the transports were ill-adapted to this use. Throughout all these operations great inconvenience arose from the lack of a few light-draught river steamers. Hancock moved out by the New Market and Malvern Hill roads, encountering little opposition until reaching Bailey's Creek, the point at which his previous advance had been arrested. Here Mott's division fronted the enemy's intrenched line, while Barlow, with two divisions, numbering nearly ten te left, and nothing was accomplished that day. On the morning of the 16th, Birney During the night the greater part of General Birney's command was massed in rear of the position occupied by General Barlow. The line from the New Market and Malvern Hill road, at a point designated on the map as the Potteries, to the extreme right, was held by a thin skirmish line only. One of General Mott's best brigades, under Colonel Craig (One Hundred and Fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers), was sent to Genera
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
tially prepared. —Hancock: Report of Operations on the Boydton Plankroad. This appears to have been a very fortunate decision, for during the night, the Confederates massed at the position where the fighting ceased fifteen thousand infantry and Hampton's cavalry, with which they had intended to assail Hancock at daylight of the 28th. The Confederate General Heth stated to me that they remained all night in the position they held when the fighting ceased on the evening of the 27th, and during the night massed fifteen thousand infantry, and Hampton's cavalry, with which they intended to have advanced upon us at daylight of the 28th.—Private Letter from General Hancock. Next morning the whole force returned to the lines before Petersburg. New movement to the left.—From this time forward the operations in front of Petersburg and Richmond, until the spring campaign of 1865, were mainly confined to the defence and extension of the lines, which were pushed westward as far as Hatcher's <
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