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Breslau (Poland) (search for this): chapter 15
ellent. His father believed that, without some personal knowledge and experience of labor, he could not have a proper sympathy with laboring men. He spend one year at a French school, and one in a boys' school taught by Rev. Samuel P. Parker, in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and finished in Lenox his studies preparatory to admission into college. After leaving college, he spent one winter in a law-office; then went abroad and studied a portion of his profession at Heidelberg, Gottingen, and Breslau. He was abroad about seventeen months. After his return, he entered the Cambrdge Law School, where he remained a year, and then established himself as a lawyer in St. Louis, Missouri. It was his good fortune to grow up, through all his boyhood and the greater part of his youth, under the eye of two excellent parents, both remarkably gifted. He was allowed to develop with great freedom and under the happiest influences and circumstances. The fear of disobeying and displeasing them was
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ct; for though the country is not thickly settled, and I only see those who come into town by the one small road we are on, I have certainly given passes to fifty who could not read what I wrote for them; yet this is the sacred soil, sacred to the memory of Washington and one or two other good men, but desecrated by the barbarous influences of this damnable institution. If slavery were to be successful in this contest, I fear I should be driven into an utter abandonment of all my faith in Providence. But if, for our own sins, we have yet a long and hard struggle before us, I am willing to accept it, so that we work our way through the darkness into light at last; and I think I could lay down my life cheerfully, if need be, could I but die in the full faith that the final result of the contest would be to plant the system our fathers founded more firmly, and purified from the canker that has corrupted it and endangered its existence. Headquarters, December 26, 1861. War with E
Gottingen (Lower Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 15
originally excellent. His father believed that, without some personal knowledge and experience of labor, he could not have a proper sympathy with laboring men. He spend one year at a French school, and one in a boys' school taught by Rev. Samuel P. Parker, in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and finished in Lenox his studies preparatory to admission into college. After leaving college, he spent one winter in a law-office; then went abroad and studied a portion of his profession at Heidelberg, Gottingen, and Breslau. He was abroad about seventeen months. After his return, he entered the Cambrdge Law School, where he remained a year, and then established himself as a lawyer in St. Louis, Missouri. It was his good fortune to grow up, through all his boyhood and the greater part of his youth, under the eye of two excellent parents, both remarkably gifted. He was allowed to develop with great freedom and under the happiest influences and circumstances. The fear of disobeying and displea
Stockbridge (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
him to Illinois to spend a summer with a farmer who was a relative, and who then lived in a log-house. Here he learned and performed every kind of farm-work of which a boy of that age is capable, and confirmed a constitution originally excellent. His father believed that, without some personal knowledge and experience of labor, he could not have a proper sympathy with laboring men. He spend one year at a French school, and one in a boys' school taught by Rev. Samuel P. Parker, in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and finished in Lenox his studies preparatory to admission into college. After leaving college, he spent one winter in a law-office; then went abroad and studied a portion of his profession at Heidelberg, Gottingen, and Breslau. He was abroad about seventeen months. After his return, he entered the Cambrdge Law School, where he remained a year, and then established himself as a lawyer in St. Louis, Missouri. It was his good fortune to grow up, through all his boyhood and th
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
d studied a portion of his profession at Heidelberg, Gottingen, and Breslau. He was abroad about seventeen months. After his return, he entered the Cambrdge Law School, where he remained a year, and then established himself as a lawyer in St. Louis, Missouri. It was his good fortune to grow up, through all his boyhood and the greater part of his youth, under the eye of two excellent parents, both remarkably gifted. He was allowed to develop with great freedom and under the happiest influenor-General Sedgwick, his kinsman, with the rank of Major. All through his period of service he wrote constantly to his family; and the following extracts will show his habits of mind, and the spirit in which he served his country. St. Louis, Missouri, April 18, 1861. The excitement increases here daily. I do not expect any outbreak to occur here for the present, but at the same time a breaking out of hostilities here at almost any moment would scarcely surprise me. Men like Mr. G——
Heidelberg (Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 15
onstitution originally excellent. His father believed that, without some personal knowledge and experience of labor, he could not have a proper sympathy with laboring men. He spend one year at a French school, and one in a boys' school taught by Rev. Samuel P. Parker, in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and finished in Lenox his studies preparatory to admission into college. After leaving college, he spent one winter in a law-office; then went abroad and studied a portion of his profession at Heidelberg, Gottingen, and Breslau. He was abroad about seventeen months. After his return, he entered the Cambrdge Law School, where he remained a year, and then established himself as a lawyer in St. Louis, Missouri. It was his good fortune to grow up, through all his boyhood and the greater part of his youth, under the eye of two excellent parents, both remarkably gifted. He was allowed to develop with great freedom and under the happiest influences and circumstances. The fear of disobeying
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 15
his period of service he wrote constantly to his family; and the following extracts will show his habits of mind, and the spirit in which he served his country. St. Louis, Missouri, April 18, 1861. The excitement increases here daily. I do not expect any outbreak to occur here for the present, but at the same time a breaking out of hostilities here at almost any moment would scarcely surprise me. Men like Mr. G——and Mr. C——--, who still profess to be thorough Union men, say that Lincoln's proclamation is sinful and outrageous; that to try and whip in the Cotton States is madly hopeless; and that when war breaks out, in consequence of the attempt, the Border States must infallibly defend their Southern brethren. Mr. G——thinks, moreover, that one Southerner is equal to two Northerners, and that the recognition of the Southern Confederacy by the European powers is so palpably certain as to leave no possible room for a contrary expectation. These are the sentiments of m
Louisa Frederica Tellkampf (search for this): chapter 15
nor to it, had not, from the moment of the outbreak of the war, the destiny of his country occupied his mind so powerfully that only with difficulty could he turn his thoughts to other matters. He felt irresistibly drawn to become active in the great national struggle; and this last year and a half of his life, with all its new and most interesting, but often sad and terrible, experiences, did much to ripen and elevate his character. He married, in 1857, at Hanover, in Germany, Louisa Frederica Tellkampf, daughter of Professor A. Tellkampf of that place. From his letters to his father-in-law at the beginning of the war we can best learn the earnest and intense interest which he took in the destiny of his people, and the motives that decided him to leave his profession and family to offer his services to the country. In reply to the warning of Professor Tellkampf, not to engage himself in the war, and before the former knew that he had joined the army already, he says:— You
discouragement and dejection would fall upon the friends of freedom everywhere, should the North now yield to the entreaties of those who say, Do not persist in this war, for you will be only shedding blood to no purpose. In accordance with these principles, Mr. Sedgwick forsook his profession, and was commissioned (May 25, 1861) as First Lieutenant in the Second Massachusetts Volunteers (Colonel Gordon). He went into service with the regiment, was detailed as ordnance officer of Major-General Banks's corps, and was soon transferred to the staff of Major-General Sedgwick, his kinsman, with the rank of Major. All through his period of service he wrote constantly to his family; and the following extracts will show his habits of mind, and the spirit in which he served his country. St. Louis, Missouri, April 18, 1861. The excitement increases here daily. I do not expect any outbreak to occur here for the present, but at the same time a breaking out of hostilities here at
A. Tellkampf (search for this): chapter 15
r and a half of his life, with all its new and most interesting, but often sad and terrible, experiences, did much to ripen and elevate his character. He married, in 1857, at Hanover, in Germany, Louisa Frederica Tellkampf, daughter of Professor A. Tellkampf of that place. From his letters to his father-in-law at the beginning of the war we can best learn the earnest and intense interest which he took in the destiny of his people, and the motives that decided him to leave his profession and family to offer his services to the country. In reply to the warning of Professor Tellkampf, not to engage himself in the war, and before the former knew that he had joined the army already, he says:— Your views are perfectly natural; but the same reasons which should induce me to withdraw from the service of government would, if adopted by all those to whom they apply as well as to me, break up our armies and leave us at the mercy of Southern dictators. In one prediction I have seen a
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