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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for William H. Prescott or search for William H. Prescott in all documents.

Your search returned 81 results in 14 document sections:

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
im about the Library. Then I went to Stirling's, and worked in his library two or three hours, till I was obliged to go and make some calls, after which . . . . I came home and rested till it was time to go to dinner at the Lyells', where I had an uncommonly good time with the Heads, and a small party consisting of the Pertzes and two or three others. Ellen and Twisleton were engaged elsewhere, for which I was sorry, for Sir Edmund was in great feather, and very amusing. . . . . To W. H. Prescott. London, July 13, 1857. dear William,—I must write to you in this hurry-skurry of a London season, if it be only to thank you and dear Susan for your great kindness to our darling Lizzie. It is mentioned in all our letters from home, and sinks into all our hearts. . . . . I am very busy. I have nearly got through with everything I wish to discuss with Mr. Bates, who continues to entertain most generous purposes towards the Library; and I have done a good deal of work in the Brit
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
t ago, the fragment of which is now before me, and would have crossed yours on the Atlantic if it had been finished; but Prescott's illness came the next day, and drove everything else out of my mind for a time. Anna wrote you about the first attackhing positive, I wish you joy of your ingenuity. I cannot. Your friends here, I think, are all well and doing well. Prescott told me yesterday that he had received letters from you and Mr. Adderley. I have seen him lately almost every day. He iago. But he does not yet feel himself equal to severe work, and has not undertaken any. In this I think he is wise. Mr. Prescott died nine days after this was written. The whole of this subject is reserved for a later chapter. Savage, who is nding three or four days with us, went to New York this morning. The two Annas and Lizzie send love. So do I. So do Prescott and Hillard, to whom I gave your messages, and so does Savage, to whom you sent none. Always yours, Geo. Ticknor.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
prived him of the delightful companionship of Prescott. Such constant affection as had united them a further source of comfort. Very soon Mrs. Prescott and her children asked him to prepare a Me usually ended at the Public Library or at Mrs. Prescott's. In his Sunday afternoon walks he was foweek I intend to send you some photographs of Prescott, and ask you and Lady Lyell to see that they first handsome quartd edition of the Life of Prescott appeared, and was seized with avidity by the to the world as one who had won the regard of Prescott. . . . . Pray give my very kindest regards the perils of an adventurer. Well as I knew Prescott, you have raised my conception of his fortitu part so well, that, in raising a monument to Prescott, you have constructed an imperishable one foring, had each a nature so pure and generous. Prescott's example as a man will have an influence, tho tell you that your letter about the Life of Prescott gave me great pleasure. I hope that you knew[24 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
I. 314. Prescott, Judge W., I. 12, 13, 316, 337, 339, 340, 345, 355 and note, 356, 359, 360, 361, 371, 383, 391, II. 207 note. Prescott, Life of, II. 437-440, 444, 449-456. Prescott, Mrs. W., I. 317 and note, 345, II. 207 note. Prescott, Mrs. W. H., II. 322, 324, 350, 354, 436, 437, 439, 444. Prescott, W. H., I. 316 and note, 317 and note, 391, II. 189, 190, 191, 196, 207 note, 251, 255 and note, 256 note, 258, 259 note, 260, 264, 269 note, 272, 275, 291, 293, 407, 419, 420; goes Prescott, W. H., I. 316 and note, 317 and note, 391, II. 189, 190, 191, 196, 207 note, 251, 255 and note, 256 note, 258, 259 note, 260, 264, 269 note, 272, 275, 291, 293, 407, 419, 420; goes to Washington with G. T., I. 380, 381; letters to, 341, 346, 349, 386, 479, II. 141, 142, 209, 322, 338, 342, 349, 354, 366; letter from, 252; death of, 419 note, 436. Preston, Mr. and Mrs., II. 391. Preston, W. C., of South Carolina, I. 278 note, 298. Prevost, Professor, I. 155, II. 37. Prichard, Dr., I. 422. Primary Schools of Boston, . 2 and note, 336. Prossedi, Princess, I. 182, 194 note. See Gabrielli. Provencal studies, I. 252, II. 487. Prussia, Frederic William III.
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