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gin, during the night, that it was simply madness to think of an assault upon it. So thought Warren, who was considered a skilful engineer; so thought the men of his command; Recognizing that the task now before them was of the character of a forlorn hope, knowing well that no man could here count on escaping death, the soldiers, without sign of shrinking from the sacrifice, were seen quietly pinning on the breast of their blouses of blue, slips of paper on which each had written his name.—Swinton's campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. so decided Gen. Meade, who rode rapidly over to the left to satisfy himself. It was a great grief to the latter to have a campaign from which he had hoped so much end without success, but any further move looking to a dislodgment of Lee would entail a still further advance into the enemy's country; and this, with our supply trains across the river, and the rations of the army now nearly exhausted, was not to be thought of in the hostile month of Dec
William G. Donnelly (search for this): chapter 10
poral Currant and privates McAllister, Maxwell and Colbath, reported to quarters. Nov. 19. Corporal Currant and Private Colbath report for duty. Nov. 20. Ten horses condemned and turned over to Capt. L. H. Pierce A. Q. Seven horses received from Capt. Pierce. Privates Maxwell and MacAllister report for duty. W. H. Fitzpatrick started tonight on a ten days leave of absence to Boston. Nov. 22. Bugler Joshua T. Reed went to Washington Hospital. Nov. 24. Daniel MacAllister and Wm. G. Donnelly reported to quarters. Orders to move which were countermanded. Nov. 25. Alex. W. Holbrook reported to quarters. Nov. 26. Left Brandy Station for Germania Ford at daylight, via Jacobs Mill Ford. Halted about two miles this side of the Ford about midnight and stopped until daylight. Nov. 27. Moved on at daylight and crossed Germania Ford at 11.30 A. M. Arrived near Robertson's Tavern at 4 o'clock and stopped all night. One mule died on the march. Nov. 28. At 2 o'clock P.
lous accounts of battles and authentic reports of movements are concocted. Now, Lee is all but surrounded, and we are waiting for the cavalry to cut his only remaino cross the river. But this cannot be true, as the testimony is concurrent that Lee made no attempt at pursuit. The campaign thus brought to a close was deservines did arise which wrecked the success of the movement. He had ascertained that Lee had left the lower fords of the Rapidan uncovered; that his two corps were widelring ultimate failure upon the plan which depended for its success on surprising Lee in winter-quarters. Early on the morning of the 27th the army, which should hunday, hence it was deferred till Monday morning with the result already known. Lee, suspecting the movement, had so strengthened his right, where the attack was toed so much end without success, but any further move looking to a dislodgment of Lee would entail a still further advance into the enemy's country; and this, with ou
Conduct of the War. During this day's march Gen. Meade caused a despatch to be read announcing Grant the tavern was a serious interference with Gen. Meade's plans, as will be shown hereafter. On tvern. In this somewhat dilapidated hostelry Gen. Meade had established his headquarters. Just to time, to my astonishment, an aid rode up from Gen. Meade, and ordered me to cease the demonstration; rd except the holding of a council of war by Gen. Meade in the little house near us, of whose doings. Some miles intervened between these corps. Meade's plan was to cross at the uncovered fords and took the wrong road. This made a delay, as Gen. Meade, not sure how much opposition he should meet bank, under the most imperative orders from Gen. Meade, pressed forward with greater rapidity. Wa left that he thought penetrable. Thereupon Gen. Meade resolved on a simultaneous attack on both wiaigns of the Army of the Potomac. so decided Gen. Meade, who rode rapidly over to the left to satis[3 more...]
L. H. Pierce (search for this): chapter 10
order Inspector General. Nov. 18. Corporal Currant and privates McAllister, Maxwell and Colbath, reported to quarters. Nov. 19. Corporal Currant and Private Colbath report for duty. Nov. 20. Ten horses condemned and turned over to Capt. L. H. Pierce A. Q. Seven horses received from Capt. Pierce. Privates Maxwell and MacAllister report for duty. W. H. Fitzpatrick started tonight on a ten days leave of absence to Boston. Nov. 22. Bugler Joshua T. Reed went to Washington Hospital. Capt. Pierce. Privates Maxwell and MacAllister report for duty. W. H. Fitzpatrick started tonight on a ten days leave of absence to Boston. Nov. 22. Bugler Joshua T. Reed went to Washington Hospital. Nov. 24. Daniel MacAllister and Wm. G. Donnelly reported to quarters. Orders to move which were countermanded. Nov. 25. Alex. W. Holbrook reported to quarters. Nov. 26. Left Brandy Station for Germania Ford at daylight, via Jacobs Mill Ford. Halted about two miles this side of the Ford about midnight and stopped until daylight. Nov. 27. Moved on at daylight and crossed Germania Ford at 11.30 A. M. Arrived near Robertson's Tavern at 4 o'clock and stopped all night. One mule died on
S. H. Johnson (search for this): chapter 10
on the south bank, under the most imperative orders from Gen. Meade, pressed forward with greater rapidity. Warren reached Robertson's Tavern about 1 o'clock P. M., where he began skirmishing with the enemy, but dared not make a serious attack until joined by the Third Corps. But, unfortunately, this body was doomed to be a further stumbling-block, for after crossing the river, Gen. French took the wrong road, which, carrying him too far to the right, involved him in serious trouble with Johnson's Division of Ewell's Corps, and by the time he had finished the brush the afternoon was far spent and the golden opportunity had passed. According to Mr. Greeley, he seems to have played at cross purposes with the implicit commands of his superior. See American Conflict, p. 400, Vol. II. Hill's Corps now coming up, the Rebel army fell back and took position along the left bank of Mine Run. Little remains to be said not already given. On the 28th Warren was sent to find the enemy's r
John W. French (search for this): chapter 10
arch. The paymaster favored us with his presence on the 12th. On the 15th we received orders to hold ourselves in readiness to march at a moment's notice, and Gen. French, accompanied by some English officers, reviewed our brigade on the 16th. Other than these no events worthy of mention occurred until the 23d, when the white hg the former was Lieut. Col. Hesser, of the Seventy-second Pennsylvania Regiment, shot through the head. While we lay here, Capt. Randolph dispatched an aid to Gen. French to inquire whether he would like more artillery, to which answer was sent that he already had more than he could get into action. It seems he took the wrong ro have joined Warren. With this body of the enemy he had been engaged during the afternoon, but they had now fallen back before him. This failure on the part of Gen. French to make an early junction with the Second Corps at the tavern was a serious interference with Gen. Meade's plans, as will be shown hereafter. On the morning
J. B. Carr (search for this): chapter 10
orests, with wonderful readiness. Ten o'clock that night found the Battery strewn along the road quite a distance, as team after team had been all but hopelessly mired. In this respect it was a repetition of our advance. The roads were badly cut up and the horses sadly jaded. Moreover, travelling as we did after dark gave no opportunity to select the best course. There stands out as a bright spot in the memory the aid given us by a body of the Blue Diamonds personally supervised by Gen. J. B. Carr. The right section, finding itself in the rear of a long train of cavalry wagons, half of them immovable in the slough, turned aside and bivouacked for the night in a bed of mud. The rest of the teams came up as rapidly as they were extricated, and the men, thoroughly exhausted with the fatigues of the day, stretched themselves on the dryest hillocks to be found, and were soon lost in slumber. Thursday morning we got under way once more, and traversed three miles of the muddiest t
George Fred Gould (search for this): chapter 10
nemy's country; and this, with our supply trains across the river, and the rations of the army now nearly exhausted, was not to be thought of in the hostile month of December. He therefore decided to sacrifice himself, if necessary, rather than continue operations longer, and issued the orders for withdrawal. He would now have marched to the heights of Fredericksburg to camp for the winter, but was again negatived in the project by Halleck. Morning reports. 1863. Nov. 12. Serg't G. F. Gould and privates H. Newton, Charles Slack, T. Ellworth, reported to quarters. Bugler Reed at hospital. Nov. 13. Privates Charles Slack, Thomas Ellworth, Hiram Warburton reported for duty. Nov. 14. Private H. Newton and Serg't Gould (?) reported for duty. Nov. 15. Five horses unserviceable. Three horses shot by order of Dr. Benson Third Corps Headquarters. Nov. 16. Received 8 horses from Capt. A H. Pierce, Warrenton Junction, Va. Nov. 17. One horse died, one horse condemned a
Hiram Warburton (search for this): chapter 10
ecember. He therefore decided to sacrifice himself, if necessary, rather than continue operations longer, and issued the orders for withdrawal. He would now have marched to the heights of Fredericksburg to camp for the winter, but was again negatived in the project by Halleck. Morning reports. 1863. Nov. 12. Serg't G. F. Gould and privates H. Newton, Charles Slack, T. Ellworth, reported to quarters. Bugler Reed at hospital. Nov. 13. Privates Charles Slack, Thomas Ellworth, Hiram Warburton reported for duty. Nov. 14. Private H. Newton and Serg't Gould (?) reported for duty. Nov. 15. Five horses unserviceable. Three horses shot by order of Dr. Benson Third Corps Headquarters. Nov. 16. Received 8 horses from Capt. A H. Pierce, Warrenton Junction, Va. Nov. 17. One horse died, one horse condemned and shot, by order Inspector General. Nov. 18. Corporal Currant and privates McAllister, Maxwell and Colbath, reported to quarters. Nov. 19. Corporal Currant and
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