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J. R. Anderson (search for this): chapter 3
But this was 1861, and military stores were not obtainable. Governor Clark and his people, however, were not of a race to succumb to difficulties without a desperate struggle, and they went to work with vigor to do all that their circumstances would allow. At the request of the governor, Gen. D. H. Hill was sent from the army of Virginia that his experience as an artillery officer might be utilized in strengthening the existing fortifications and in the construction of new defenses. J. R. Anderson, a retired soldier of Virginia, was commissioned by President Davis a brigadier-general and sent to the Cape Fear district. With the paucity of material at their command, these officers exerted every energy to aid General Gatlin, who was in charge of the whole department. General Hill, however, could be spared from his command for only a few months, and in November he was ordered back to command a division in General Johnston's army. Gen. L. O'B. Branch succeeded him and was put in co
W. S. G. Andrews (search for this): chapter 3
inlet that afternoon. To resist this formidable expedition, the Confederates in the forts had eight companies of the Seventeenth North Carolina regiment, Col. W. F. Martin, and some detachments of the Tenth North Carolina artillery. The whole force on the first day of the engagement amounted to 580 Rebellion Records, IV, 574. men. On the second day the Ellis Scharf's History Confederate Navy. landed some reinforcements, raising the number to 718. The post was commanded by Maj. W. S. G. Andrews. These forces were divided between Fort Hatteras and Fort Clark, which were about three-quarters of a mile apart Fort Hatteras—the position of which was so good that the enemy's engineer officer said after its capture, With guns of long range it can successfully defend itself from any fleet—was a square redoubt with pan coups at all the salients, and was constructed of sand, revetted with turf from adjoining marshes. Instead of being defended by guns with long range, it mounted twe
A. C. Avery (search for this): chapter 3
with ranks greatly thinned. With him went down many North Carolinians whose names were not so prominent, but whose conduct was as heroic. Roy's Regimental History. Just as the Sixth reached the guns there was a lull in the fierce contest, and officers and men sought a moment's rest. Young Wiley P. Mangum, exclaiming, I am so tired! threw himself under the quiet shadow of one of the guns, so recently charged with death, and Captain Avery, Lieuts. John A. McPherson, B. F. White, A. C. Avery and others gathered around the battery. Just then, from a wood in their left front, the Second Wisconsin regiment fired into the Carolinians. This regiment was dressed in gray uniform, Sherman's Memoirs. and from this fact, as well as from its position, the officers of the Sixth thought it was a Confederate regiment and called out to their men who were beginning to return the fire not to shoot, and made signals to the supposed friends. Young Mangum, who had sprung to his feet at the
I. E. Avery (search for this): chapter 3
Official Report. The Sixth was so close to Ricketts that the elevation of his guns lessened their deadly effect, and its close-range volleys soon drove back the supporting zouaves and terribly cut down his brave gunners. At this juncture Capt. I. E. Avery said to his courageous colonel, who was also his close friend, Now we ought to charge. That is right, captain, answered Fisher, and his loud command, Charge! was the last word his loved regiment heard from his lips. In prompt obedience thed the guns there was a lull in the fierce contest, and officers and men sought a moment's rest. Young Wiley P. Mangum, exclaiming, I am so tired! threw himself under the quiet shadow of one of the guns, so recently charged with death, and Captain Avery, Lieuts. John A. McPherson, B. F. White, A. C. Avery and others gathered around the battery. Just then, from a wood in their left front, the Second Wisconsin regiment fired into the Carolinians. This regiment was dressed in gray uniform,
Admirals Dewey and Sampson. The next morning the Federal fleet, using improved Paixhan, Dahlgren and columbiad guns, stood well out from shore and battered to pieces the forts and their guns. This they did in perfect safety, for, says Flag-Officer Barron, Official Report of the Confederate navy, who arrived at Hatteras on the evening of the 28th and succeeded to the command, not a shot from our battery reached them with the greatest elevation that we could get. So, adds Barron, withoutBarron, without the ability to damage our adversary, and just at this time the magazine being reported on fire . . . I ordered a white flag to be shown. The immediate results of this expedition, says General Hawkins, Battles and Leaders. were the capture of 670 men, 1,000 stand of arms, 35 cannon and two strong forts; the possession of the best sea entrance to the inland waters of North Carolina, and the stoppage of a favorite channel through which many supplies had been carried for the use of the Confed
Beauregard (search for this): chapter 3
Toward the middle of July expectant eyes were turned to Virginia. The Confederate army under Generals Johnston and Beauregard was throwing itself into position to stop the On to Richmond march of the Federal army under Gen. Irvin McDowell. Two ever before fought on this continent, and the largest volunteer armies ever assembled since the era of standing armies Beauregard in Battles and Leaders. were approaching each other. Battle is always horrible, but this was most horrible in that theColonel Lightfoot, became separated from the right companies and took no part in the gallant rush forward, of which General Beauregard says, Fisher's North Carolina regiment came in happy time to join in the charge on our left. Official Report. l cut down and their commander seriously wounded. But the charge was a costly one. Colonel Fisher, in the words of General Beauregard, fell after soldierly behavior at the head of his regiment with ranks greatly thinned. With him went down many Nor
f ammunition was expended early in the engagement. On the morning after the fleet's arrival, 318 men and two pieces of artillery, under cover of the ships' guns, were landed without opposition from the Confederates, whose garrison was unequal to defense and only large enough to give importance to its capture. Scharf. During the landing of these troops and until late in the day, when a rising gale drove the ships out to sea, the fleet fiercely bombarded the forts. In this engagement Boynton, as quoted by Hawkins, Battles and Leaders. asserts that Commodore Stringham introduced the system of ships firing while in motion instead of waiting to fire from anchorage, a system adopted by Farragut and which has, in the Spanish- American war, given such world-wide celebrity to the fleets of Admirals Dewey and Sampson. The next morning the Federal fleet, using improved Paixhan, Dahlgren and columbiad guns, stood well out from shore and battered to pieces the forts and their guns.
L. O'B. Branch (search for this): chapter 3
he construction of new defenses. J. R. Anderson, a retired soldier of Virginia, was commissioned by President Davis a brigadier-general and sent to the Cape Fear district. With the paucity of material at their command, these officers exerted every energy to aid General Gatlin, who was in charge of the whole department. General Hill, however, could be spared from his command for only a few months, and in November he was ordered back to command a division in General Johnston's army. Gen. L. O'B. Branch succeeded him and was put in command of the forces around New Bern, and Gen. Henry A. Wise was assigned to the command of Roanoke island. Mirth-provoking would have been some of the shifts for offensive and defensive weapons had not the issues at stake been human life. Antiquated smooth-bore cannon, mounted on the front wheels of ordinary farm wagons, drawn by mules with plow harness on, moved to oppose the latest rifled columbiads and Parrott guns of Goldsborough's fleet. A regime
ve been some of the shifts for offensive and defensive weapons had not the issues at stake been human life. Antiquated smooth-bore cannon, mounted on the front wheels of ordinary farm wagons, drawn by mules with plow harness on, moved to oppose the latest rifled columbiads and Parrott guns of Goldsborough's fleet. A regiment armed with squirrel rifles and fowling-pieces, and carving knives in place of bayonets, was transported to Roanoke island to engage the admirably equipped soldiers of Burnside. The catalogue of the names of Lynch's fleet in Albemarle sound—the Seabird, Ellis, Beaufort, Curlew, Raleigh, Fanny and Forrest—sounds imposing enough even now when we remember that with fewer vessels Dewey fought at Manila; but when we recall that the flagship was a wooden side-wheeler, carrying only two guns and one of them a smooth-bore; that the other members of the squadron were canal tugboats, carrying one gun each; that the gunners were raw details from raw infantry; that the flee
B. F. Butler (search for this): chapter 3
antiated by five officers present on the field, and by the written statements of many others, published years ago. This battle ended the fighting in Virginia for that year. North Carolina, however, was not so fortunate, for the next month saw Butler's descent upon its coast. The coast of North Carolina, as will be seen by the accompanying map, is indented by three large sounds: Currituck, Albemarle and Pamlico. Into these the rivers of that section, most of them navigable, empty. These deral government fitted out at Fortress Monroe a combined army and navy expedition for an attack on the two forts at Hatteras. The land forces, Rebellion Records, IV, 580 consisting of 800 infantry and 60 artillerymen, were commanded by Gen. B. F. Butler; the naval force, comprising the war vessels Wabash, Susquehanna, Pawnee, Monticello, Cumberland, Harriet Lane and transport ships, carrying in all 143 guns, was commanded by Flag-Officer S. H. Stringham. these forces sailed for Hatteras i
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