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Browsing named entities in a specific section of D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Stuart (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
oad waters of these sounds, with their navigable rivers extending far into the interior, would control more than one-third of the State and threaten the main line of railroad between Richmond and the seacoast portion of the Confederacy..... These sounds of North Carolina were no less important to that State than Hampton Roads was to Virginia. Scharf's History of the Confederate States Navy. The long sandbank outside of these sounds and separating them from the ocean, reached from near Cape Henry to Bogue inlet, two-thirds of the entire coast line. Here and there this bulwark of sand is broken by inlets, a few of which allow safe passage from the Atlantic, always dangerous off this coast, to the smooth waters of the sound. The necessity of seizing and holding these inlets, controlling as they did such extensive and important territory, was at once seen by the State authorities. So, immediately after the ordinance of secession was passed, Governor Ellis ordered the seizure of For
Clark (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
, they were pitifully inadequate to the tasks assigned them. The one at Ocracoke was called Fort Morgan, and the two at Hatteras respectively Fort Hatteras and Fort Clark. When the State became a member of the Confederacy, these works, along with the mosquito fleet, consisting of the Winslow, the Ellis, the Raleigh and the Beaufy. landed some reinforcements, raising the number to 718. The post was commanded by Maj. W. S. G. Andrews. These forces were divided between Fort Hatteras and Fort Clark, which were about three-quarters of a mile apart Fort Hatteras—the position of which was so good that the enemy's engineer officer said after its capture, With s with long range, it mounted twelve Both Hawkins in Battles and Leaders and Scharf fall into mistake of saying 25 guns. smooth-bore 32-pounders. The other, Fort Clark, was a redoubt of irregular figure, and mounted five 32-pounders and two small guns. Its supply of ammunition was expended early in the engagement. On the m
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
State and threaten the main line of railroad between Richmond and the seacoast portion of the Confederacy..... These sounds of North Carolina were no less important to that State than Hampton Roads was to Virginia. Scharf's History of the Confederate States Navy. The long sandbank outside of these sounds and separating them from the ocean, reached from near Cape Henry to Bogue inlet, two-thirds of the entire coast line. Here and there this bulwark of sand is broken by inlets, a few of whigh which many supplies had been carried for the use of the Confederate forces. Porter, in his Naval History, comments: This was our first naval victory—indeed, our first victory of any kind, and great was the rejoicing thereat throughout the United States. The Federals at once occupied this commanding position and made it the basis of future operations against this coast. With the exception of a skirmish at Chicamacomico this battle ended the offensive operations in 1861. After the captur
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
s of which both rose to be major-generals, had done excellent service during the day, and not until they were captured was McDowell's army routed. At the time of Fisher's arrival these guns, which had only recently been moved to this plateau, were supported by the Eleventh New York (Fire Zouaves) and the Fourteenth (Brooklyn) New York. Fisher's presence was not even suspected by the enemy until he broke cover about, says Captain White, Ms. Regimental History. 125 yards in front of Ricketts' battery, and with commendable gallantry, but with lamentable inexperience, cried out to his regiment, which was then moving by flank and not in line of battle, Fol, with Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, became separated from the right companies and took no part in the gallant rush forward, of which General Beauregard says, Fisher's North Carolina regiment came in happy time to join in the charge on our left. Official Report. The Sixth was so close to Ricketts that the elevation of his gu
Fort Caswell (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ry to Bogue inlet, two-thirds of the entire coast line. Here and there this bulwark of sand is broken by inlets, a few of which allow safe passage from the Atlantic, always dangerous off this coast, to the smooth waters of the sound. The necessity of seizing and holding these inlets, controlling as they did such extensive and important territory, was at once seen by the State authorities. So, immediately after the ordinance of secession was passed, Governor Ellis ordered the seizure of Fort Caswell, near Smithville, and of Fort Macon, near Morehead City. These were strengthened as far as the condition of the State's embryonic armories allowed. Defenses were begun at Ocracoke inlet, at Hatteras inlet, and on Roanoke island. Though these works were dignified by the name of forts, they were pitifully inadequate to the tasks assigned them. The one at Ocracoke was called Fort Morgan, and the two at Hatteras respectively Fort Hatteras and Fort Clark. When the State became a member of
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
human life. Antiquated smooth-bore cannon, mounted on the front wheels of ordinary farm wagons, drawn by mules with plow harness on, moved to oppose the latest rifled columbiads and Parrott guns of Goldsborough's fleet. A regiment armed with squirrel rifles and fowling-pieces, and carving knives in place of bayonets, was transported to Roanoke island to engage the admirably equipped soldiers of Burnside. The catalogue of the names of Lynch's fleet in Albemarle sound—the Seabird, Ellis, Beaufort, Curlew, Raleigh, Fanny and Forrest—sounds imposing enough even now when we remember that with fewer vessels Dewey fought at Manila; but when we recall that the flagship was a wooden side-wheeler, carrying only two guns and one of them a smooth-bore; that the other members of the squadron were canal tugboats, carrying one gun each; that the gunners were raw details from raw infantry; that the fleet had frequently to anchor while the crew cut green wood to fire the boilers—when we recall all<
Morehead City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
Here and there this bulwark of sand is broken by inlets, a few of which allow safe passage from the Atlantic, always dangerous off this coast, to the smooth waters of the sound. The necessity of seizing and holding these inlets, controlling as they did such extensive and important territory, was at once seen by the State authorities. So, immediately after the ordinance of secession was passed, Governor Ellis ordered the seizure of Fort Caswell, near Smithville, and of Fort Macon, near Morehead City. These were strengthened as far as the condition of the State's embryonic armories allowed. Defenses were begun at Ocracoke inlet, at Hatteras inlet, and on Roanoke island. Though these works were dignified by the name of forts, they were pitifully inadequate to the tasks assigned them. The one at Ocracoke was called Fort Morgan, and the two at Hatteras respectively Fort Hatteras and Fort Clark. When the State became a member of the Confederacy, these works, along with the mosquito
Fort Johnston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
two-thirds of the entire coast line. Here and there this bulwark of sand is broken by inlets, a few of which allow safe passage from the Atlantic, always dangerous off this coast, to the smooth waters of the sound. The necessity of seizing and holding these inlets, controlling as they did such extensive and important territory, was at once seen by the State authorities. So, immediately after the ordinance of secession was passed, Governor Ellis ordered the seizure of Fort Caswell, near Smithville, and of Fort Macon, near Morehead City. These were strengthened as far as the condition of the State's embryonic armories allowed. Defenses were begun at Ocracoke inlet, at Hatteras inlet, and on Roanoke island. Though these works were dignified by the name of forts, they were pitifully inadequate to the tasks assigned them. The one at Ocracoke was called Fort Morgan, and the two at Hatteras respectively Fort Hatteras and Fort Clark. When the State became a member of the Confederacy,
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
mistake about this regiment. He says, When driven back from the guns, neither the North Carolinians nor the Mississippians remained to renew the charge, but incontinently left the field. The North Carolinians never fell back except when, as explained above, they were fired upon by a regiment thought to be on their own side, and they yielded ground then only after repeated injunctions from their own officers not to fire. They returned with Kershaw, followed the enemy in the direction of Centreville until ordered to return, and at night camped on the battlefield. Maj. R. F. Webb and Lieut. B. F. White, detailed to bury the dead, collected twenty-three bodies near the battery, and those of Colonel Fisher and Private Hanna were lying far beyond it. These assertions are substantiated by five officers present on the field, and by the written statements of many others, published years ago. This battle ended the fighting in Virginia for that year. North Carolina, however, was not so f
Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
had not the issues at stake been human life. Antiquated smooth-bore cannon, mounted on the front wheels of ordinary farm wagons, drawn by mules with plow harness on, moved to oppose the latest rifled columbiads and Parrott guns of Goldsborough's fleet. A regiment armed with squirrel rifles and fowling-pieces, and carving knives in place of bayonets, was transported to Roanoke island to engage the admirably equipped soldiers of Burnside. The catalogue of the names of Lynch's fleet in Albemarle sound—the Seabird, Ellis, Beaufort, Curlew, Raleigh, Fanny and Forrest—sounds imposing enough even now when we remember that with fewer vessels Dewey fought at Manila; but when we recall that the flagship was a wooden side-wheeler, carrying only two guns and one of them a smooth-bore; that the other members of the squadron were canal tugboats, carrying one gun each; that the gunners were raw details from raw infantry; that the fleet had frequently to anchor while the crew cut green wood to f
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